By Pete Dickey

The AR-15 is the semi-automatic — sometimes called "Civilian" — version of the U.S. military M16 rifle of the same caliber. It differs from the M16 in that it is manufactured without provision for a full-automatic sear and with a two position selector (fire and safe), rather than the M16 three-position selector (safe, semi and auto). The later M16A1 U.S. Service rifle is equipped with a forward assist plunger on the right side of the receiver, but this is lacking in the M16 and the AR-15.

The AR-15, then, is a semi-automatic, gas-operated, maga-zine-fed rifle, suitable for military match-type shooting and popular as a small game hunting rifle. It was introduced by Colt in 1963, and at this writing over a 100,000 have been made and sold. In addition to its sporting use, the AR-15 has considerable appeal as a police or guard rifle, where full-automatic capability is not required.

The AR-15 is made up of more than 150 parts, but many of these parts arc pre-assembled by the factory into component groups. A simple appearing handguard, for instance, is actually a two-part riveted assembly comprised of 24 separate, if simple, pieces. The buffer assembly (over a dozen parts) may be removed easily from the buttstock as a unit, but should not be broken down to its component parts.

There also are various screws with thread-locking material installed and a number of rollpins and rivets, the removal of any of which would tend to lessen its effectiveness on reinstallation. In some cases it might be necessary to replace pins, rivets or

Hunting Mastery Selected Tips

Hunting Mastery Selected Tips

Deer hunting is an interesting thing that reminds you of those golden old ages of 19th centuries, where a handsome hunk well equipped with all hunting material rides on horse searching for his target animal either for the purpose of displaying his masculine powers or for enticing and wooing his lady love.

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