Winchester Model Rifle

By James M. Triggs

Mauser Bolt

In 1925, Winchester Repeating Arms Co., New Haven, Conn., announced production of the Winchester Model 54 bolt-action rifle chambered for the revolutionary cal. .270 WCF cartridge. Both rifle and cartridge were immediately successful. The action design of the Model 54 was basically that of the Mauser 98. It had a one-piece bolt with dual front locking lugs, cock-on-opening action, and a Mauser-type staggered-column, integral box-magazine. The Model 54 was made in several grades and chamberings, and in both sporting and target styles.

In 1937 the Model 54 was displaced by the Model 70 bolt-action rifle incorporating several improvements, including an independent bolt stop, hinged floorplate, speed-lock ignition, forged-steel trigger guard, and a better stock design. The Model 70 also featured a safety permitting installation of low-mounted scope sights, and a single-stage trigger of superior design. The bolt handle was redesigned for lowest possible scope mounting and the knob positioned opposite the trigger for maximum effectiveness in rapid-fire.

Since its introduction the Model 70 has achieved an enviable reputation throughout the world. Many consider it to be the finest factory-made bolt-action rifle. It has been produced in a variety of styles for target and sporting purposes. The list of chamberings ranges from the tiny .22 Hornet through the 458 Winchester Magnum.

It is currently available in cals. .220 Swift, .243 Winchester. .264 Winchester Magnum, .270 Winchester, .308 Winchester. .30-'06, .300 H&H Magnum. .338 Winchester Magnum, .375 H&H Magnum, and .458 Winchester Magnum. Obsolete chamberings are .22 Hornet, .250 Savage, .257 Roberts, 7 mm. Mauser, 7.65 mm. Mauser, 9 mm. Mauser, .358 Winchester, and .35 Remington.

A development of the post World War II period is the Featherweight model with aluminum-alloy trigger guard, floorplate, and buttplate, and lightened barrel and stock.

Although the basic Model 70 action design has remained virtually unchanged since its introduction, there have been numerous changes in styles, models, and available calibers.

Check action to be sure rifle is unloaded. Remove breech bolt assembly from receiver. Breech bolt disassembly is shown in detail in illustrations at right.

To remove receiver (1) and barrel (3) from buttstock. remove forearm stud screw (5). magazine cover hinge plate screw

(44), magazine cover assembly complete with magazine spring (40) and follower (39), and front and rear guard bow screws (49-50). Lift receiver and barrel out of buttstock carefully. Remove guard bow

(45) from buttstock.

Receiver parts—ejector (23). bolt stop (28), trigger (30), sear (35) with respective springs—are all easily removed from receiver by drifting out their appropriate pins. Bolt stop plunger (26) and spring (27) are removed from hole at left rear of receiver after removing bolt stop. Assembly is accomplished in reverse order. To facilitate correct reassembly, care should be taken to keep springs and pins in order.

Parts Legend

1. Receiver

2. Receiver plug screws

2A. Metallic sight base plug screws (in left of receiver—not shown here)

3. Barrel

4. Forearm stud

5. Forearm stud screw

6. Rear sight assembly (Lyman shown here —various types available)

7. Front sight (various types available)

8. Breech bolt

9. Extractor ring

10. Extractor

11. Firing pin spring

12. Firing pin sleeve

13. Firing pin

14. Breech bolt sleeve

15. Safety lock (old style)

16. Breech bolt sleeve lock

17. Breech bolt sleeve lock spring

18. Breech bolt sleeve lock pin

19. Firing pin stop screw

20. Safety lock plunger

21. Safety lock plunger spring

22. Safety lock stop pin

23. Ejector

24. Ejector spring

25. Ejector pin

26. Bolt stop plunger

27. Bolt stop plunger spring

28. Bolt stop

29. Trigger pin

30. Trigger

31. Triggei stop screw nut

32. Trigger stop screw

33. Trigger spring

34. Trigger spring adjusting nuts (2)

35. Sear

36. Sear spring

37. Sear pin

38. Magazine

39. Magazine follower

40. Magazine spring

41. Magazine cover

42. Magazine cover hinge plate

43. Magazine cover hinge pin

44. Magazine cover hinge plate screw

45. Guard bow

46. Magazine cover catch

47. Magazine cover catch spring

48. Magazine cover catch pin

49. Front guard bow screw

50. Rear guard bow screw

Note—Buttstock, buttplate, screws, various sling swivels available, and remaining standard buttstock fittings are omitted for clarity

Buttstock Buttplate
and draw bolt to rear and out of receiver
Antique Melior Rifle

2 Turn extractor (10) to position shown and push forward, releasing extractor from lips of extractor ring (9)

Percussion Derringer Blueprints

"safe" and "fire". Then remove bolt, depress breech bolt sleeve lock (16), and unscrew percussion assembly from breech bolt and move safety lock to "fire" position

Derringer Firing Pin

to rear slightly. Turn firing pin sleeve Va turn in either direction as shown and allow sleeve (12) and spring (11) to come forward, taking care to avoid letting the tightly compressed spring get away. Remove spring and sleeve from firing pin. Breech bolt sleeve (14) can be removed from firing pin by unscrewing firing pin stop screw (19). Reassembly is accomplished in reverse order ■

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Responses

  • Marigold
    How does mauser eject cartridge?
    5 years ago
  • Uranio
    How to remove ejector plunger winchester mod. 70?
    4 years ago
  • Ren
    How to remove a ejectore plungger from a model 70 winchester bolt?
    4 years ago
  • sofia puurunen
    How to install a tirger in a modle 70 wichester rifle?
    7 months ago
  • alarico
    How to make .22 bolt action firing pin?
    5 months ago

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