Machine Pistol Bolt

■ he Holmes MP83A1 firearm I described herein is the culmination I of several designs. The first of which I was created in 1976 and was the sub-ject of my first book. Home Workshop Guns for Defense and Resistance: Vol. I, The Submachine Gun, hereinafter referred to as Vol. I.

Vol. I has been sold in most countries of the free world and smuggled into several Third World and communist countries. After 17 years in publication, it still sells as well as it did when first introduced.

In 1982 the Naval Weapons Procurement Center, acting for the joint military services, solicited proposals from interested parties for a new military submachine gun design. Of course, I thought I should submit one. So I built a prototype gun that fulfilled the stated requirements, mainly to make sure it would work the way I thought it would. Happily, it worked the way it was supposed to, so I submitted my proposal, which I called the MP82. Unhappily, mine was rejected in favor of the Heckler & Koch MP5.

While awaiting a decision by the government

(it took the bureaucrats almost a year to make up their minds), I shot the prototype several hundred times, and, although it worked the way it was supposed to, I thought improvements could be made. I then built another gun incorporating the changes. This one was designated the MP83. Though it didn't actually function any better than the original, it was shorter and lighter in weight. It was also considerably more streamlined, making for a much improved appearance. Shortly after making these improvements 1 was notified that H&K had gotten the contract. The government didn't even look at my gun.

At this point, since most people who saw and fired the MP83 wanted one, I started building and marketing a semiautomatic model in several versions. Included were open-bolt; closed-bolt; locked-breech, closed-bolt in 9mm, 10mm, and 45ACP calibers; and long-barreled carbine versions complete with detachable butt stocks. I continued to build these firearms for more than six years, until the government suddenly decided that the guns were illegal and prohibited me from building them. The bureaucrats also stopped my

9mm Machine Pistol
The open-bolt version of the Holmes MP83A1.
Improvise Open Bolt

Left: The MP83AJ disassembled.

Below: The upper receiver tips up to allow bolt and trigger assembly removal.

Left: The MP83AJ disassembled.

Below: The upper receiver tips up to allow bolt and trigger assembly removal.

Above: Removable trigger assembly of theMP83Al.

Right: Safety and magazine release are centrally located for easy access by either hand.

Above: Removable trigger assembly of theMP83Al.

Right: Safety and magazine release are centrally located for easy access by either hand.

Walther Hand Machine CarbineHolmes Mp83

Left: Completed MP83 AI shown with interchangeable bolt and trigger assembly, which allows conversion to open-bolt operation.

Below: Gun with action open, with both trigger and bolt assemblies.

Left: Completed MP83 AI shown with interchangeable bolt and trigger assembly, which allows conversion to open-bolt operation.

Below: Gun with action open, with both trigger and bolt assemblies.

Open Bolt Pistol

manufacture of a similar .22-caliber gun that I was building at the same time.

As might be expected, my interest in pistols of this type diminished considerably because of these developments, and I didn't build any for sale to the public. Some two years went by before I decided to build another gun, one which would be legal. This one would be a hammer-fired, closed-bolt gun. It would be longer and with a heavier bolt, making it easier to control. I built two guns and intended to market them, but continuous harassment by federal agents forced me to give up on even this. The end result is what you see in this book.

For a time, a small, lightweight, extremely fast firing gun with the magazine housed in the grip was thought to be ideal, and I embraced this philosophy. However, I eventually realized that a heavier gun with slightly more bulk and a slower rate of fire was far more controllable. Moving the grip as far to the rear as possible and using a separate magazine housing as a foregrip also enhanced controllability and stability, as well as accuracy.

The gun described in this book, then, is some 16 inches in overall length, using a 6-inch barrel. It weighs approximately 5 pounds The magazine housing is positioned several inches forward from the grip. It has a two-stage trigger, eliminating any switches or levers to contend with when changing the mode of fire. It has a rate of fire of approximately 600 rounds per minute (rpm) and very little muzzle climb or recoil.

As I have always tried to do with all my books, this book is in easy-to-follow, plain English that most readers should be able to understand. I am not trying to impress anyone by using big words or complicated sentences. Frankly, since my vocabulary is very limited, I couldn't even if I wanted to.

At the risk of being considered repetitious, let me remind you once more that the manufacture or possession of this gun is illegal and punishable by rather harsh penalties. Therefore, this book is offered for academic study only.

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Responses

  • crassus
    How to build firearms?
    6 years ago
  • TIFFANY
    How to build a mp83 gun?
    6 years ago
  • Mira Parras
    How to build a workshop of firearms?
    6 years ago
  • Anniina
    How to make a 25mm sniper explain to image mode?
    6 years ago
  • miska
    Has anyone built and fired the expedient 9mm?
    5 years ago

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