Acp

Extremely popular in Europe where it is known as the 7.65mm Browning, the .32 ACP was first marketed by Fabrique Nationale about 1900. Virtually every European pistol manufacturer has chambered for it, as have several in the United States. The .32 ACP is used in America primarily for back-up and self defense guns, while in Europe, it is considered appropriate as a primary police round. The SAAMI Maximum Average Pressure for the .32 Auto is 20,500 P.S.I.

Acp Browning

The .25 automatic pistol cartridge was introduced in 1908 for the Browning-designed, Colt .25 Pocket Automatic. This cartridge was also produced in Europe as the 6.35 Browning. The .25 ACP has been and still is available in a myriad of inexpensive handguns. It is capable of reasonably high velocities for such a small cartridge. The SAAMI Maximum Average Pressure for the .25 ACP is 18,000 C.U.P.

Browning

The .50 Browning began life in 1921 as a military cartridge for a heavy machine gun for support of ground assault. By the end of World War II, it was also a standard cartridge for aircraft for air-to-air combat. Experiments in non-standard military channels resulted in its use for long range sniping, notably by Bill Brophy during the Korean conflict. Through the years shooters across the country built rifles for the cartridge. Gunsmiths rebarreled Boyes anti-tank rifles with surplus military...

Colt [ruger Tc Only

This loading data was developed in response to shooters' request for more powerful loads for use in Ruger and T C handguns. These loads develop the same pressures as +P .45 ACP loads. Despite occasional recommendations by other sources, do not handload .45 Colt ammo to .44 Magnum pressure levels. The .45 Colt brass is not as strong as .44 Magnum cases. These loads must not be used in older, weaker firearms but should prove entirely satisfactory in the firearms for which they are intended.

Government

After one of the most thorough small arms research and development programs ever launched by the U.S. Military, the .4570 Government cartridge was adopted by the U.S. Military in 1873 for use in the new, single-shot trapdoor Springfield rifle. It was, and continues to be, a popular cartridge for sporting use and many repeating and single-shot rifles were chambered for it. Older firearms such as the 1873 trapdoor Springfield should generally not be loaded beyond 18,000 P.S.I. This data was...

Holland Holland Magnum

Introduced in 1925 by the British firm of Holland & Holland, the Super .30 was first offered in the U.S. by the Western Cartridge Company. Although available as factory ammunition, no American-made commercial rifles were chambered for the .300 H& H until 12 years after its introduction. In 1935, Ben Comfort won the 1000-yard Wimbledon Cup Match with this cartridge and it then became the new sensation. By 1937, Winchester had chambered the new Model 70 for the .300 H& H. Remington later...

Hr Magnum

This stretched .32 S& W Long was a joint venture of Federal Cartridge and Harrington & Richardson. The initial ad campaign showed the cartridge to have more muzzle energy than the venerable .38 Special, yet with reduced recoil. This cartridge is the .32 S& W Long lengthened by 0.155. Any revolver chambered for the .32 H& R Magnum will also fire the .32 S& W Long and .32 S& W interchangeably. While this cartridge clearly exceeds the power of its predecessors, its label as a...

Introduction

There are several compelling reasons to reload your own ammunition. It is a popular impression that you can save money by reloading and there is some basis of fact in that because the brass case is the most expensive component in most factory cartridges. In extreme examples -- the .600 Nitro Express comes to mind -- a single empty cartridge case can cost 16.00 or more. Most cases cost well below that figure but the price is still substantial. Because the typical cartridge case can be reloaded...

Mm

The 8mm-06 wildcat cartridge came about as a matter ofconvenience. Following WWII, returning GIs brought back many 8mm Mauser rifles as war souvenirs, both military and commercial manufacture. The scarcity of 8mm Mauser ammo or brass prompted many owners to have their rifles rechambered to use the .3006 cases with 8mm bullets. The 8mm-06 is an excellent wildcat cartridge suitable for all North American big game. It is as flexible in its choice of propellants as is the .30-06 and provides...

Mm Br Remington

The 6mm BR Remington is the 7mm BR case necked down. Remington chambers their Model XP-100 pistol for this cartridge. The 6mm BR Remington is effective on small game up to a range of200 yards. The SAAMI Maximum Average Pressure for the 6mm BR Remington is 52,000 C.U.P. We developed the data in our test barrel in P.S.I. Loads producing 54,000 P.S.I. in our pressure barrel produced 50,000 C.U.P. These loads do not exceed that pressure.

Mm MAGNUM

This proprietary cartridge was developed for Irwindale Arms, Inc. for use in their auto loading pistol. The 10mm Magnum could be thought of as a rimless .401 Power Mag, if anyone should happen to remember Herter's proprietary revolver and cartridge. Both cartridges approximate the .41 Magnum in power. This cartridge is a lengthened 10mm Auto and is loaded to pressure levels similar to the .44 Magnum for use in the IAI handguns.

Mm Weatherby Magnum

This is one of Roy Weatherby's better creations. The Weatherby cartridge has the typical double radius shoulder and a long neck. Any real difference in performance between the 7mm Weatherby Magnum and the 7mm Remington Magnum is largely a product of either variations in individual rifles or the shooter's ability. The SAAMI Maximum Average Pressure for the 7mm Weatherby Magnum is 65,000 P.S.I. The 7mm STW is the first in the Shooting Times series cartridge developed by gun writer Layne Simpson....

Norma Magnum

The .30-338 is a wildcat cartridge formed by necking the parent .338 Winchester Magnum case down to .30 caliber. The fondness of U.S. shooters for cartridges that will function in the various rifles normally used in high-power competition prompted the development of this cartridge. The somewhat shorter case of the .30-338 wildcat permits seating bullets further out than the .300 Winchester Magnum, its closest competitor in long-range competition. The velocities obtained with these two...

Remington

The .35 Remington chambering in the XP-100 and T C Contender is a favorite of both handgun hunters and the silhouette crowd. The velocity loss in the 14 barrel of the Contender, compared to a rifle, is not significant. Loading spitzer bullets for the T C pistol will improve downrange ballistics. Accuracy of the Contender and XP-100 handgun is usually very good with both jacketed and cast bullets. The SAAMI Maximum Average Pressure for the .35 Remington is 33,500 P.S.I. The .35 Remington...

Remington Maximum

The .357 Maximum is a Ruger and Remington co-development, chambered initially in an enlarged Blackhawk revolver. This chambering is also available in the Dan Wesson revolver and the T C Contender. The .357 Remington Maximum is a popular cartridge for IHMSA revolver class silhouette. The .357 Maximum is a .357 Magnum case lengthened 0.315. The SAAMI Maximum Average Pressure for the .357 Remington Maximum is 48,000 C.U.P. LEAD BULLETS .359 (9,119) JACKETED BULLETS .358 (9,093

Remington Ultra

The .300 Remington Ultra Mag is another in the long line of wildcats brought to market by Remington. To achieve ultimate performance, Remington has maximized case volume by using a necked down .404 Jeffery case which provides about 10 more volume than other .300 Magnum cartridges. This extra volume allows for a higher propellant charge weight which results in higher velocities. Most of these loads are considered maximum by the technical staff at Accurate Arms. The only exceptions are the lead...

S Acp P

During WWI, both Colt and S& W made revolvers chambered for the .45 ACP cartridge. These revolvers required the use of a half-moon clip to support and eject the rimless .45 ACP brass. After the war, thousands of these revolvers were sold to the public. In 1920 the Peters Cartridge Company introduced a rimmed version of the .45 ACP which eliminated the need for using the pesky clips in these revolvers. The .45 AR was also loaded with a lead bullet to reduce wear on the shallow rifling used in...

Springfield

The .30-06 Springfield is actually a modified version of the Cartridge, Caliber .30, Model of1903. The original cartridge had a 220-grain, round-nosed FMJ bullet with a muzzle velocity of 2,300 FPS. As a result of ballistic experiments in Europe, the U. S. Army modified the .30-03 cartridge by shortening the neck 0.070 and loading a short pointed bullet weighing 150 grains to a muzzle velocity of 2,700 FPS. This cartridge then became known as the Caliber .30, Model of 1906 or simply the .30-06...

Super Automatic P

An updated, high pressure version of the .38 ACP. Its popularity improved dramatically when IPSC competitors found they could use Accurate No.7 and No. 9 with heavier bullets and make Major Power Factor. The SAAMI Maximum Average Pressure for the .38 Super is 33,000 C.U.P.

Warning Important Information on Data Read Before Using

Handloading center-fire metallic cartridges should only be undertaken by someone familiar with safe reloading procedures. One must observe all precautions and practices related to the proper handling of any highly flammable material. We suggest you read up on correct reloading procedures. There are a number of excellent books on the subject. All of our powders are test fired in our laboratory. Under these controlled conditions, our data shows that our powders produce safe cartridges. Your...

Waters

This cartridge was developed by the well known gun writer and ballistics expert Ken Waters. This is the result of his attempt to develop a flat trajectory cartridge for use in lever action carbines. In 1983 U.S. Repeating Arms Company decided to chamber their Model 94 lever action rifle for this cartridge while the Federal Cartridge Company worked out the final version of the cartridge that became the commercial 7-30 Waters. Thompson Center also chambered their Contender for the 7-30 Waters. It...

Weatherby

This wildcat is the largest capacity .30 caliber cartridge in use today. It was originally developed for 1,000-yard benchrest competition, although a handful of shooters now use it for long-range hunting. This is the ultimate cartridge for driving a heavy .30 caliber bullet very far, very fast. There is no SAAMI pressure criteria for the .30-378. The maximum loads shown below are based upon the pressure limits for the parent cartridge case and the other cartridges in this class. This is a...

Weatherby Magnum

When most people think Weatherby, the .300 Magnum is the cartridge they think of first. Based on the .300 H& H case, the .300 Magnum has the trademark (Weatherby) double radius shoulder. Cartridge cases are made by Norma with the Weatherby headstamp. They can also be made by fire-forming .300 H& H cases. The .300 Weatherby Magnum is the most powerful .30 caliber cartridge commercially available in the world. It is the only .30 caliber magnum capable of substantially exceeding the...

Winchester

The .32-20 Winchester was chambered in revolvers to provide a companion handgun to the owners of.32-20 rifles. When used in a handgun, the .32-20 is adequate for small game and varmints at close range. The SAAMI Maximum Average Pressure for the .32-20 Winchester is 16,000 C.U.P.

Winchester Magnum

The .264 Winchester Magnum was introduced by Winchester in 1958. As originally introduced in Winchester's Model 70 Westerner, it was available with a 26 inch stainless steel barrel. The .264 Winchester Magnum was designed to produce what Winchester hoped would be the ultimate open-country hunting cartridge for deer-sized big game. To accomplish this feat of engineering, Winchester's ballisticians utilized a 2-diameter bullet with only the section aft of the cannelure being full groove diameter....

Colt Carbine

The .45 Colt carbines are another example of Americans' affinity for a handgun and carbine chambered for the same cartridge. The data shown below are the same loads developed for use in the Ruger Revolver and T C Contender single-shot handgun. These loads were fired through a 16 barrel Winchester Model 94AE carbine. Our data does not exceed the pressures of .45 ACP +P loads. These loads are intended only for use in modern carbines chambered for the .45 Colt cartridge.

Remington Magnum

The .222 Remington Magnum was originally developed as an experimental military cartridge in a cooperative effort between Remington and Springfield Armory for use in light combat rifles. This cartridge is basically a lengthened .222 Remington. This gives it approximately a 20 greater case capacity and another 100 yards of effective range. As a military cartridge, the .222 Remington Magnum eventually evolved into the 5.56x45 mm. The commercial version of the new military round is the .223...

ACP Imm KURZ

Known in Europe as the 9mm Browning Short, the .380 Auto was introduced by John Browning in 1912 and has been chambered by nearly every manufacturer of semi-automatic pistols. The .380 Auto is a much better choice for self defense than either the .25 or the .32 Autos and is routinely used by several foreign police and military organizations In the hunting field, it is adequate for small game with cast or jacketed bullets, but only at close range. The SAAMI Maximum Average Pressure for the .380...

Xmm

Developed by the Soviets in 1943, the 7.62x39mm (M43) Russian cartridge was undoubtedly influenced by the German 7.92 Kurz. This cartridge received worldwide attention during the Vietnam War. Returning GIs brought Communist bloc weapons into the United States creating a demand for ammunition. The 7.62x39mm cartridge is easy to reload and may be thought of basically as a rimless .3030 Winchester in power. However, the .30-30 Winchester is capable of using heavier bullets than the 7.62x39mm. The...

Xmm JS

Because of shooter requests for 8x57mm Mauser loads that are the equivalent of ammunition currently loaded in Europe, The Accurate technical staff has developed the following data. The European pressure limit for the 8x57mm is approximately 97 of the loading limit for the .30-06. This equates to a working pressure limit of about 58,200 P.S.I. The performance of the 8mm Mauser is excellent when loaded to its full potential. This data should only be used in rifles that have been determined to be...

Savage

Introduced by Savage Arms Company for the Model 99 lever action in 1920, the .300 Savage was intended to duplicate the performance of the original U.S. Ball Cartridge, caliber .30, Model of 1906. The .300 Savage is the perfect complement to the Model 99 lever action rifle. Until the introduction of the .308 Winchester, the .300 Savage was the only .30-caliber cartridge suitable for use in short action rifles. While not recommended for large bear, the .300 Savage has proven its effectiveness on...

Mm LUGER

Adopted by the German Navy in 1904 and the German Army in 1908, the 9mm Luger is the world's most widely used military handgun cartridge. In 1985 the United States Armed Forces adopted a Beretta semi-automatic pistol in 9mm to replace the aging Model 1911A1, .45 ACP. It is used by numerous police and military organizations. Plus many IPSC shooters are currently using it in competition. (Hunting use should be restricted to small game and the use of expanding bullets.) The SAAMI Maximum Average...

Krag

Army, or .30-40 Krag, was adopted in 1892 as America's first small bore military cartridge. It was later offered in the Remington-Lee bolt action, Remington Rolling Block, Winchester Model 95 lever action and the Highwall single shot rifles The Krag military rifles and carbines are famed for their accuracy and smoothness of operation but they are not noted for strength. Consequently, the .30-40 Krag cannot be loaded in these rifles to match the performance of even the .303 British,...

Br Remington

This wildcat cartridge was developed from the Remington 7mm BR case. Like the 6mm BR Remington, (which is now available as a factory round), the .22 BR Remington is widely used by the bench-rest shooting fraternity. In addition to its excellent accuracy, this cartridge produces surprisingly high velocities making it an excellent choice for long range varmint hunting. There is no current SAAMI pressure limit for the .22 BR Remington. These loads are considered maximum by the Accurate Arms...

Smith Wesson Long

Also known as the .32 Colt New Police, this cartridge was introduced by Smith & Wesson in 1903. For many years the .32 S& W Long was deemed adequate for police use in the United States and was quite popular with plain-clothesmen. It has a reputation for excellent accuracy and, up until the 1960s, was widely used for target shooting in the United States. Using wadcutter loads in semiautomatics, the .32 S& W Long is still popular in International Centerfire Competition. For hunting its...

Colt

The .45 Colt was introduced as one of the first cartridges for the Model P Colt Single Action Army revolver. This cartridge was adopted by the U.S. Army in 1875 and served as their official military handgun cartridge for 17 years. As originally developed, the .45 Colt was loaded with 40 grains of FFg powder with a 255 grain lead bullet for about 810 FPS. The .45 Colt has been around for 120 years and still has a loyal following. It has become popular to fire higher pressure loads in modern...

Roberts Ackley Improved

There are several improved versions ofthe .257 Roberts of which the .257 Ackley Improved is the most popular. The Ackley design has a 40 shoulder which increases case capacity to the maximum practical amount. The .257 Ackley Improved is an excellent long-range varmint cartridge and is also suitable for most North American game. There is no SAAMI pressure limit for the .257 Roberts Ackley Improved. We developed our loading data to the same pressure level as the .25-06 Remington.

Jdj

This is a product of NRA pistol silhouette competition and was originated by Vern Juenke. It is the .22 Hornet necked up to take .270 caliber bullets. The cartridge produces minimal recoil, yet is capable of knocking down the NRA targets. There is no SAAMI pressure limit for the .270 R.E.N. The maximum loads listed below are approved by the manufacturer of the Merrill single shot pistol, Jim Rock.

Store In A Cool Dry Place

Be sure the storage area selected is free from any possible sources of excess heat and is isolated from open flame, furnaces, water heaters, etc. Do not store smokeless powder where it will be exposed to the sun's rays. Avoid storage in areas where mechanical or electrical equipment is in operation. Restrict from the storage areas heat or sparks which may result from improper, defective or overloaded electrical circuits. Do not store smokeless powder in the same area with solvents, flammable...

Magnum

Introduced in 1935 by S& W for their large frame revolver, the .357 Magnum is based on the .38 Special case lengthened 1 10th of an inch so it could not be chambered in a standard .38 Special revolver. The .357 Magnum was the most powerful handgun cartridge for nearly 20 years, until the arrival of the .44 Magnum. The .357 Magnum has been chambered in almost countless revolvers. While it has been used successfully on deer, black bear, and even larger game animals, the .357 Magnum cannot...

Sharps Straight W

This was the largest of the several case sizes Sharp introduced at the time althought the .45-120 was introduced some years later. Many gun manufacturers have realized the nostalgic value of this cartridge and have begun to chamber some of their rifles for this load. We set the Maximum Average Pressure for our data the same as the .45-70 at 28,000 P.S.I. Please note that a firm crimp is necessary for good powder ignition. Please note that a firm crimp is...

Rigby

This is a proprietary cartridge introduced in 1911 by John Rigby for his magnum action Mauser rifles. Both the rifle and cartridge were well received in Africa where they established an impressive record on dangerous game. The .416 Rigby is a large case. The combination of a large case capacity and a low working pressure reduces the selection of suitable propellants drastically. There is no SAAMI pressure limit for the .416 Rigby. Federal factory ammunition produced 44,000 P.S.I. in our...

XR

The 9.3x74R is a popular cartridge in Germany for single shot, double, and combination guns. Developed early in this century, it is still available in both Austrian and German firearms. The 9.3x74R gained a reputation for reliability on all large game in Africa including elephant. It would be more than adequate for any North American big game. Accurate 4350 is an excellent choice for handloading the 9.3x74R. There is no SAAMI pressure limit for the 9.3x74R. Norma factory ammunition produced...

Xmm MAUSER

Ruger Old Army Smokeless Loads

Designed by Paul Mauser in 1889, the 7.65 x 53mm was adopted as a military cartridge by the governments of Belgium, Argentina, Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Turkey. Both Remington and Winchester loaded sporting ammunition and produced rifles chambered for this cartridge until about 1936. Similar in power to the .308 Winchester, the 7.65 Mauser is adequate for hunting most big game in North America. Both ammunition and brass are available from Norma. There is no current SAAMI pressure...

Mm TCU

Another cartridge developed by Wes Ugalde and chambered originally by Thompson Center Arms. This cartridge is based on the .223 Remington case necked up to 6.5mm. All the loads developed in our pressure barrel proved to be quite consistent. The 6.5 T CU should be adequate for small game and varmints at ranges up to 200 yards. There is no SAAMI pressure limit for the 6.5 T CU. Based on the recommendations of Thompson Center, these loads are limited to the same pressures as the .223 Remington...

Mm Remington

The 7mm-08 Remington was originally a wildcat developed for the game of High Power Rifle Metallic Silhouette Shooting. Basically, the .308 Winchester case necked down to accept 7mm caliber bullets, the 7mm-08 will reliably topple rams at 500 meters without excessive recoil. These attributes prompted Remington to introduce the 7mm-08 as a factory cartridge in 1980. After initial rave reviews by members of the gun press, the 7mm-08 Remington was almost forgotten. It has maintained a niche in the...

What Is Recoil

Webster's dictionary defines recoil as to fall back under pressure, or in the instance of a firearm the action of recoiling, or the kickback of a gun upon firing. Recoil is one of the unpleasant side effects that comes with shooting. In some cases, as with heavy magnum guns and loads, it can be severe, even painful. In other cases, it simply contributes to the shooter's inability to shoot a perfect score through flinch. Recoil can be measured in two ways one in the sense of physics expressed in...

Super

Available in limited numbers from Dan Wesson and T C, the .375 Super Mag is a .375 Winchester case shortened to fit the cylinder of a large frame Dan Wesson revolver. While developed primarily as a silhouette round, this cartridge is certainly capable of hunting big game. Based on the recommendations of Thompson Center, the maximum pressures of the loads shown below do not exceed those of the .44 Magnum.

Automatic

Designed by John Browning for Colt in 1900, this is the original cartridge that became known in 1929 as the .38 Super, the difference being an increase in pressure to improve the performance in the weapons for which it was chambered. This data can also be used for loading the 9mm Steyr, 9mm Largo and the 9mm Bergmann-Bayard. The SAAMI Maximum Average Pressure for the .38 Auto is 23,000 C.U.P.

Mm Remington Magnum

After refusing for years to produce a metric magnum, the pressure in the American market became so great that Remington introduced the 7mm Remington Magnum in 1962 along with the new, improved Model 700 bolt action rifle. The 7mm Remington is essentially the .338 Winchester case necked down to 7mm. It is a fine long-range, big game cartridge that can also be used for varmint hunting. With a wide variety of bullets available, the handloader can utilize this cartridge for any game in North...

Xmm Tokarev

This handgun is increasing in popularity in the U.S. In determining the appropriate pressure limit for our load data we tested various military ammo from China, Austria, Bulgaria and the Czech Republic. Commercial ammo produced by Sellier and Berloit was also tested. Based on these test results we arrived at a maximum pressure for our load data of 42,000 C.U.P. The pressure data shown here was developed in a 9 pressure barrel. We then fired the same loads through an issue CZ-52 to record the...

Extremely Flammable

Accurate Arms powders are packaged in approved containers. Do not transfer powders to containers that are not approved by the Department of Transportation. 2. Store in cool, dark, dry place. 3. Keep out of reach of children. 4. If possible, do not store all your containers in one place. 5. Do not smoke where powders are stored. 6. Keep powders away from electrical devices or machinery that could produce heat or sparks. 7. Keep powders away from other combustible materials or flammable liquids....

Sb Smith Wesson Special continued

* Shot capsules using 105 grains of No.9 shot. * Shot capsules using 105 grains of No.9 shot. This is a higher pressure loading of the popular .38 S& W Special. This was originally developed for use by law enforcement agencies. The SAAMI Maximum Average Pressure for the .38 S& W Special +P is 18,500 P.S.I.

MATCH

After the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) was formed, it was decided that it would be advantageous to the members to have interchangeable weapons and ammunition. There were two major contenders to be the NATO cartridge. These were the British .280 caliber and the American's T65 cartridge. NATO selected the T65 cartridge in its final form in February 1954 and in August 1954 the U.S. Army Ordinance Committee formally standardized this cartridge for U.S. Service under the official name...

Swift

The .220 Swift may be the best varmint cartridge ever produced. This ballistic phenomenon was developed by Winchester and introduced in 1935 in the new Model 70 bolt action rifle. Discontinued by Winchester in 1964, it is currently available in rifles made by Remington, Ruger and Savage. If anything, the .220 Swift is more popular now than ever. With a muzzle velocity of 4,110 FPS, the .220 Swift is still the fastest commercial cartridge in the world. Unlike many cartridges, the Swift will...

Info

This wildcat is based on the .30-06 case necked down to accept .264 diameter bullets. The 6.5-06 is very similar to the old .256 Newton cartridge loaded by the Western Cartridge Company from 1913 to 1938. For fans of the 6.5mm bore, the 6.5-06 is an excellent choice. The cartridge cases are easy to form and the cartridge is suitable for long-range varmint shooting or hunting and even elk and moose with proper bullets. There is no SAAMI pressure limit for the 6.5-06. The Maximum Average Pressure...

Casull

The .454 Casull is a proprietary cartridge developed by Dick Casull and chambered by Freedom Arms in their five-shot revolver. The .454 originated as a wildcat but is now available as factory ammunition. The cartridge cases are of thick wall construction and while .45 Colt cases can be chambered, they should never be reloaded with .454 data. The pressure limits vary among the bullets listed below according to the bullet manufacturer's recommendation. The .454 Casull represents about the maximum...

SO mm MAUSER

This cartridge was developed by an American, Hugo Borchardt, for the first commercially successful semi-automatic pistol. It has been used mainly in Mauser military automatic pistols and has been copied all over the world. Until the arrival of the .357 Magnum revolver cartridge, the .30 Mauser was the highest velocity pistol cartridge available. While never very popular in the United States, it is nevertheless adequate for hunting small game and varmints at ranges up to 100 yards. There is no...

Desert Eagle

The .357 Sig is basically the .40 S& W cartridge necked down to take 9mm bullets. This cartridge was developed specifically for the law enforcement market. It is intended to duplicate the ballistics of the highly regarded 125 Grain JHP .357 Magnum load as fired in a 4 barrel revolver. Reports from the field praise the accuracy of this round. Our No. 9 has proven to be well suited for this round. This is without a doubt the most ballistically consistent handgun cartridge we have ever worked...

D M Carbine

Ordinance Department decided to develop a light carbine to replace the .45 caliber Model 1911A1 pistol for combat situations. A number of private manufacturers submitted samples for test. The Winchester version was officially adopted in 1941 as the .30 M1 carbine. The cartridge itself is a modification of the .32 Winchester Self-Loading cartridge. As far as producing a more accurate and powerful lightweight sidearm is concerned, the U.S. Army's effort was successful. However,...

Luger

Introduced around 1900 by the Deutsche Waffen u. Munitions Fabriken, this 7.65mm bottlenecked round was the original cartridge for the Luger automatic pistol. While not noted for stopping power, the .30 Luger is suitable for taking small game at close range. The SAAMI Maximum Average Pressure for the .30 Luger is 28,000 C.U.P. Introduced around 1900 by the Deutsche Waffen u. Munitions Fabriken, this 7.65mm bottlenecked round was the original cartridge for the Luger automatic pistol.

Smith Wesson Ae

Introduced in 1990, this cartridge was developed primarily for the law enforcement market. Guns chambered for the .40 S& W combine high-capacity magazines with acceptable stopping power. It is slightly less powerful than the 10mm Auto which reduces the probability of over-penetration but is considerably easier to control during rapid fire. As a result of testing to optimize terminal ballistics on the 10mm Auto, the FBI adopted a reduced power loading. Smith & Wesson subsequently offered a...

Sharps Straight

The .50-110 was introduced in 1872 in the heyday of buffalo hunting. Many gun manufacturers have realized the nostalgic value of this cartridge and have begun to chamber some of their rifles for this load We set the Maximum Average Pressure for our data the same as the .50-140 at 28,000 P.S.I. Please note that a firm crimp is necessary for good powder ignition. Please note that a firm crimp is necessary for good powder ignition.

Xmm Japanese Arisaka

The 7.7mm Arisaka was adopted by the Japanese Military in 1939 to replace the older 6.5mm military cartridge however, both cartridges were in use throughout WWII. The 7.7mm Arisaka is very similar in performance to the .303 British cartridge and uses the same diameter bullets. However, the 7.7mm Arisaka is a rimless case whereas the British round is rimmed. When loaded with proper bullets, the 7.7mm Arisaka is adequate for hunting most North American big game. With the exception of military...

222rem Reduce Load With 5744 Powder

Introduced in 1950 by Remington in the Model 722 rifle (and still available in the M700), the triple deuce was an overnight success. It has a well deserved reputation for accuracy and was for a long time the top contender at benchrest matches. Its relatively mild pressure gives long barrel life while providing varmint hunting capability out to 250 yards. In the years since its commercial introduction, the .223 Remington has made significant inroads into the .222's popularity. However, the 222's...

Mm PPC

Lou Palmisano and Ferris Pindell in 1975 for benchrest competition, this cartridge is based on the .220 Russian case. The objective of this wildcat was to utilize a small rifle primer in a shortened powder column to achieve more uniform ignition. The success of this research and development program is demonstrated by the 6mm PPC's continued success in benchrest competition. Although .220 Russian cases are very difficult to obtain, factory cases made by Sako are now available....

Marlin

The popularity of the .44 Magnum revolver cartridge as a rifle round prompted Marlin, in 1964, to introduce their .444 Marlin. This cartridge is, in essence, an extra long .44 Magnum. It fires the same 240 grain soft point but at nearly 2400 FPS as compared to about 1800 FPS for the average .44 Magnum rifle. The .444 Marlin is much more powerful than the older .3030 Winchester or .35 Remington, and at close ranges is on par with the .348 Winchester. However, the bullet sectional density is...

Winchester Schuetzen

The .32-40 was a long time favorite of such notable riflemen such as Harry M. Pope. Its reputation for fine accuracy is well documented. It survived the transition from black powder to the early bulk smokeless propel- lants. It is equally at home with today's Accurate offerings, both single and double based. This data was developed using breech seated bullets. This data should also be applicable for use in rifles chambered for the 8.15x46R. The loads with 2015BR are especially well suited for...

Mach Iv

This wildcat cartridge is simply the .221 Remington Fireball case necked down to .17 caliber. The O'Brien Rifle Company is the originator of this very efficient cartridge, a little powder goes a long way. Based upon the parent case and the type of rifles used, we used a pressure limit of 52,000 C.U.P., the same as the .17 Remington. As there are no doubt many versions of this cartridge in existence, caution is advised in approaching the listed maximum charge.

Smith Wesson

The .38 S amp W was developed in the late 1800s for use in Smith amp Wesson's top-break revolvers. It was adapted as a British service load for the Webley revolver and called the .380 200. The British concluded that the shocking power of the 200 grain lead bullet loaded in this cartridge was of equal effectiveness as their older .45 caliber military cartridge. The U.S. Postal Service for many years used revolvers chambered for the .38 S amp W cartridge for their security work. The bore...

How Important Is Accurate Recordkeeping

Have you noticed how many of today's wonderful improvements have also made our lives more complicated For example, when I was a teenager, I used to be able to work on my own car. Now it's difficult for me to find an air or oil filter under the hood of a new car, much less be able to replace it. The same scenario holds true for reloading. It was much simpler back when firearms shot loose powder, ball and caps instead of modern, fixed ammunition. How can that be , you ask. Because before the mid...

Accurate 4350 22-250

Originally based on the .250-3000 Savage case, the .22-250 was one of America's most popular wildcat varmint and benchrest cartridges from the mid 1930s until its adoption by Remington in 1965 as a factory cartridge. Presently rifles chambered for the .22-250 are available from almost every major rifle manufacturer. While not capable of the velocities produced by the .220 Swift, the .22-250 Remington is a well-balanced .22 varmint cartridge. The data for the Sierra 80 HPBT is for use only with...

Roberts

Originally designed by Ned Roberts during the 1930s, the .257 Roberts is based on the 7x57mm Mauser necked to .25 caliber. When Remington introduced the commercial version of this cartridge in 1934, they changed the shoulder angle from 15 to 20 . The .257 Roberts was originally introduced in Remington's Model 30 bolt action rifle. Remington also produced the Model 722 bolt action and 760 Gamemaster pump chambered for this cartridge, as well as a limited run of the Model 700 Classic. Winchester...

Zipper

The .219 Zipper was introduced in 1937 by Winchester in the Model 64 rifle. It is based on the .2535 Winchester case necked to .22 caliber. The Model 64 lever action rifle did not prove sufficiently accurate for long-range shooting and did not allow easy use of telescopic sights. Winchester discontinued .219 Zipper ammunition in 1962 and Remington followed suit shortly thereafter. In a single shot or bolt action rifle, the .219 Zipper was considered as accurate as any other .22 centerfire...

Bain Davis

Developed in about 1964 by gunsmith Keith Davis, the .357 44 Bain amp Davis was intended to be used in modified .44 Magnum revolvers in order to improve the velocity of 158 grain .357 caliber bullets compared to .357 Magnum performance. It also gave long barrel performance in a standard length barrel. As implied by its name, the .357 44 Bain amp Davis is made by necking down the .44 Magnum to .357 without any other change. This is an easy cartridge to form and, for a time, was popular. The .357...

Herrett

The .357 Herrett was a joint effort of Steve Herrett and gun writer Bob Milek in an attempt to improve upon the performance of the .30 Herrett for big game hunting with a handgun. The .357 Herrett is formed from .3030 or .32 Winchester Special cases. Intended initially as a big game hunting cartridge for the T C Contender, it developed a following among silhouette shooters. In the hands of a skilled marksman the .357 Herrett is capable of taking most North American large game. Based on the...

Ppc

This wildcat cartridge was developed from the original 6mm PPC which is the brain child of Dr. Lou Palmisano and Ferris Pindell of benchrest fame. Both cartridges are based on the .220 Russian case and were originally formed from Sako brass. Factory cases are currently available from Sako. The primary use of this cartridge is in benchrest competition although it is a completely satisfactory varmint cartridge. There is no SAAMI pressure limit established for the 22 PPC. These loads are...

Pressure Testing

The American National Standards Institute Sporting Arms and Ammunition Manufacturers Institute recognizes two methods for pressure testing of small arms ammunition. These are with Copper Units of Pressure CUP and Piezo PSI . Accurate Arms Company uses both methods. The standards for pressure used by Accurate Arms Company in preparing this manual are contained in ANSI SAAMI Z299.3-1990 and Z299.4-1992. All maximum loads are kept equal to or less than the Maximum Average Pressure as defined in...

6.5 Jdj Pressure

The 6.5 JDJ is one of the early examples of the JDJ series of cartridges. The .225 Winchester case was selected for the following reasons It is rimmed. Rimmed cartridges are more user friendly than rimless in the T C. The .225 is the correct capacity to give maximum velocities in the normal barrel lengths found in the T C and do it with less powder than many larger capacity cases. Most importantly, the .225 case is tough. Correctly loaded and sized it will last for a long time. In loading the...

Kdf Taylor

This proprietary cartridge was developed by Phil Koene of Klein-guenther Distinguished Firearms. Barnes Bullets provided the necessary bullets cases are easily formed from 458 Winchester brass. Research proved that .411 diameter bullets feed through the magazine of the Voere rifles more reliably than .416 bullets used in the same cartridge. Accurate 2460 and 2520 are the best all-around powders. This data is also suitable for use in the 416 Taylor. The major difference between these two...

The Folly Of More Powder

Alas, how many times have I seen hand-loaders exceed published loading data until their actions barely opened And for the sake of a few extra FPS. Then they declare to the world how much more they know than those wimps who publish loading manuals. They describe their ammunition as maximum handloads. My definition of what has just occurred is dangerous handloads. My next definition of dangerous handloads is when published loading data is exceeded, any time, for any reason, intentional or...

Whisper

As the name implies, this cartridge is designed for subsconic velocities with medium to heavy bullets. Another load developed by JD Jones, who is proud of the fact that the .300 Whisper has gained acceptance as a hunting round for mid size game such as deer. Maximum Average Pressures were based on the .221 Fireball which are 52,000 C.U.P.

Sharps

The .50-90 Sharps was introduced in 1875 as the premier cartridge of its day for buffalo hunting. It represented a substantial increase in power over the .50-70 Government which was used by many of the hide hunters. The .50-90 is also called the .50-100 or .50-110 depending on the bullet weight and powder charge used. Although obviously suitable for any large North American big game, if not for the current limited production of Sharps replicas chambered for it, this cartridge would have been...

Accurate 2 Luger

Semi-automatic carbines chambered for the 9mm Luger cartridge are intended only for informal target shooting or plinking. Although there are numerous models of select fire weapons produced for military and law enforcement agencies, these are not generally available to the shooting public. All loads shown below produced a small velocity increase when fired from the carbine. The velocity increase was more pronounced with the lighter bullet weights. The SAAMI Maximum Average Pressure for the 9mm...

Chronographing Metallic Ammunition

You've probably heard them the reasons for not using a chronograph- What the heck do I need a chronograph for, a deer isn't going to know whether a bullet is going 2700 or 2800 feet-per-second when it hits him. Or this one I don't need a chronograph because the loading manuals tell me what the velocity is, and that's close enough. If you hear a remark like one of these, it's a good bet that the shooter has not used a chronograph and really doesn't understand what a chronograph can do for him....

Shotshell Propellant

Nitro 100 - A fast burning, double base flake propellant. Developed for 7 8, 1, and 1-1 8 ounces of shot in 12 gauge for trap, skeet, and light field loads. Nitro 100 is excellent in low pressure revolver cartridges, and is especially well suited for the .45 Colt. Clean burning in all applications. Nitro 100 is relatively temperature insensitive. Solo 1000 - A fast, ultra clean burning, porous, single base flake powder ideal for all shotgun and select handgun loads. Excellent in Cowboy Action...

Swedish Mauser

The 6.5x55mm Swedish Mauser was adopted in 1894 and subsequently chambered in the Swedish Models 94, 96 and 38 rifles and carbines. In the Scandinavian countries, the 6.5x55mm has a reputation for both superb accuracy and effectiveness as a game cartridge. The 6.5x55mm, while never very popular in the United States, is currently experiencing a resurgence. With the recent influx of surplus rifles and ammunition, availability of reloading components is improving. The SAAMI Maximum Average...

Mm Arisaka

The 6.5x50mm Arisaka was the service cartridge for the Model 38 bolt action rifle used by the Imperial Japanese troops. Large numbers of these rifles were brought back to the United States by returning Gl's from the Pacific theater of operations following VJ Day. The 6.5x50mm has a semi-rimmed case with the smallest powder capacity of any of the military 6.5mm cartridges. Commercial ammunition and components are available from Norma. Norma factory ammunition produced 40,000 P.S.I. in our test...

Alliant 2025 Smokeless Powder

Created by Elgin Gates for handgun silhouette shooting. The 7mm IHMSA is based upon the .300 Savage case necked down to 7 mm. This cartridge was chambered in the Wichita bolt action single shot pistol. This cartridge is almost as powerful as the slightly larger 7mm-08 Remington. There is no SAAMI pressure limit for the 7mm IHMSA. Based on the strength of the Wichita bolt action handgun, the maximum loads listed below do not exceed that of the 7mm-08 Remington. .448 3.3125.3115 11,38mm lt 7,94...

Super Automatic P continued

The .38 S amp W Special continues to be the most popular handgun cartridge in the U.S. It is very accurate and is widely used for competitive shooting. Also known as the .38 Colt Special, or more generally as the .38 Special, it was introduced by Smith amp Wesson in 1902 for their military and police model revolver. This is an excellent cartridge for the novice handgunner due to its inherent accuracy and low recoil. The .38 Special is also a popular sporting cartridge. Its hunting use should be...

XR Russian

This cartridge was developed for the Czar's troops in 1891. Its 150-grain spitzer bullet was adopted in 1909 Prior to and during WWI, the rifles were manufactured by New England Westinghouse Co., Remington and Winchester. When the Czar lost the revolution, large numbers of these rifles were declared surplus and were sold to U.S. citizens. Remington loaded a 150 grain bronze point hunting round for a time. Bore dimensions vary in these rifles from .308 up to .311. Our pressure barrel has a .311...

Accurate 8700 Powder For 40-65 Winchester

The .40-65 Winchester, also known as the .40-65 Marlin, was introduced in 1887 for Winchester's Model 86 lever action rifle. The Winchester singleshot rifle was also chambered for it. The .40-65 was loaded with both black and smokeless powder and remained listed in Winchester catalogs until about 1935. The .40-65 Winchester is essentially the .45-70 Government cartridge necked down to .40 caliber. The purpose behind this cartridge was to increase the power available in Winchester's lever action...

Accurate Reloading

The .307 Winchester is a rimmed version of the .308 Winchester. Introduced in 1982 for the Model 94 XTR Angle Eject Carbine. Marlin's Model .336 ER in .307 was introduced about the same time. The .307 designation is intended to simply avoid confusion with the .308 Winchester. The .307 uses uses standard .308 diameter bullets. While the .307 is a significant improvement over the .30-30 Winchester as a hunting cartridge, it still suffers from the design limitations of the Model 94 lever action...

Whelen

The .35 Whelen was designed by the late Col. Townsend Whelen and built by Mr. James Howe while he was employed at Springfield Armory about 1922. This wildcat is the .30-06 case necked up to take .35 caliber bullets with no other change. The .35 Whelen's popularity diminished somewhat after Winchester's introduction of their Model 70 rifle chambered for the .375 H amp H Magnum however, the ease of case forming for this cartridge and its effectiveness upon game kept this wildcat in use for many...

Brief History Of Computers In Ballistics

It is well known nowadays that the modern science of ballistics owes much to the development of electronic computers. But, it is not so well known that the development of modern computers owes at least as much to the science of ballistics. Nearly fifty years ago, the U.S. Army Ballistic Research Laboratory put the first high-speed electronic digital computer into operation. It was designed and built by engineers from the University of Pennsylvania under a contract let by the U.S. Army Chief of...

Miller Short

The .32 Miller Short resulted from many years of working with the longer cases .32 40 and 8.15x46R. The first problem is keeping the powder in the cases. A high side-walled action, such as the DeHaas Miller action, though stronger and safer than the other type actions, is harder to load. Some shooters pick up the rifle from the rest as each round is loaded. This allows cases with open mouths to be loaded and does locate the powder however, moving the rifle for each shot is not the best way to...

Rowland

The 460 Rowland is based on the .45 Winchester Magnum case with a length 1 16 longer than that of the standard .45 ACP. This increased length is intended to prevent chambering the round in a firearm not specifically intended for it's use. Based upon the design pressure limit of the .45 Winchester Magnum of 40,000 C.U.P. and discussions with Mr. Rowland the pressure limit for this cartridge has been set at 40,000 C.U.P. as well. The loading data shown below does not exceed this limit. These...

Nra High Power Service Rifle Loads

The purpose of this section is to provide the NRA High Power competitor with a quick reference for the most requested loading data. Although most of the data in this section is also found in other listings throughout the loading guide, some portions of this data were developed for inclusion only in this section. This section is broken down into three parts. The first is for the three service rifle cartridges the 5.56mm, the 7.62x51mm and the .30-06. In developing the 5.56 data we used...

Obsolete Black Powder Cartridges

The following section on old cartridges is the result of requests for data from you, the Accurate reloader. If we receive additional requests from you, then future editions of the Accurate Arms Loading Guide will have an expanded section for these cartridges. Shooting the old cartridges is both challenging and satisfying. I suppose, that to a large extent, many of us have become somewhat jaded by the almost bewildering array of components available today. The combinations of these components...

British

The .303 British was the official military cartridge of England and the British Empire from 1888 until it was replaced by the 7.62 NATO in the 1950's. Originally a black powder cartridge, the .303 British was loaded with smokeless propellant after 1892. The original load for hunting used a 215 grain bullet and developed a good reputation for effectiveness on large game in the Canadian wilderness. Of the same general performance and design of the U.S. .30-40 Krag, the .303 British is loaded to...