Completing The Rifling Process

1. In use, if the rifler doesn't glide along easily, first check for excessive wood requiring removal at the axles, grooves, tailstock guide or headstock areas.

2. Watch for guide tooth working loose. You may need to add a screw and washer to hold it in position. Place the screw and washer on the side of the headstock the guide tooth is working toward.

3. Use plenty of lard. Reuse the lard if it is cooled enough to stay on the cutter bit. Keep the bit cutting smoothly.

See Figure 25B

Cut Rifling

Fig 25B

4. Don't use too thick of paper shims. The bit may not start or result in a jam inside the barrel.

5. If the rifling rod gets slightly bent through the course of rifling, no need to remove and straighten it until the rifling job is completed.

6. If you go too fast, the bit may jump the groove due to the rifling rod flexing and over twisting when under excessive pressure. If this happens STOP immediately. Back the rifling head out of the bore. Check the cutter for possible damage. Resume rifling, but proceed more slowly.

7. Check bit often for metal debris build up.

8. Don't worry about cleaning the metal swarf out of the barrel. It will normally come out of the barrel on it's own. Any metal whiskers trapped won't scratch the bore. What is in the barrel serves as a polishing agent. Expect to get long metal whiskers out of the barrel during the rifling process. This usually occurs after installing a new shim. See Figure 26B

Rifling Bench
Fig. 26B

9. After 1700 to 2000 passes, clean the muzzle with a short starter and rag about 2-3 inches into the bore. Check groove depth and eveness with a flashlight. See Figure 27B & 28B

Rifling Bench
Fig. 27B_

Bookie prefers to use a .020" non-lubricated patch when wiping down the barrel during the rifine process. Any tight woven material will work fine.

Rifling Bench

Fig. 28B

Rifling Bench

Figure 26B shows the rifling in the barrel, after approximatly 1700 passes with the rifler.

Rifling Bench

©2004 A Wooden Iowa Rifling Bench PagC 49

12. The wooden rifling head will wear on the bottom and have grooves duplicating the rifling. This is normal. Excessive wear will prohibit the head from being used on another barrel. Check carefully after each rifling job to see if it is still usable. See Figure 3OB

©2004 A Wooden Iowa Rifling Bench PagC 49

Fig. 28B

Figure 26B shows the rifling in the barrel, after approximatly 1700 passes with the rifler.

10. The barrel will require 10-14 shims/"papers" to complete the rifling job to depth on tne average.

11. We finished at 3300 passes or cuts/strokes, with 14 papers. No issues, jams or loose parts. Got much quieter as the rifler got worn in. Took about 5+ hours of steady work.. See Figure 29B

Fig. 30B

Cutter head tip; Excessive wear in this area is acceptable.

B = Along bottom center of the wooden cutter head; If this area becomes concave and wears too much below the cutter, this will weaken the base of the cutter bit mortise. Cracks will occur, resulting in the cutter bit coming out of the head during rifling resulting in a major FUBAR!!

C = Brass sleeve; Wear here is acceptable as long as the rifling grooves do not cut through the brass resulting in jagged edges or does not retain the cutter head securely.

13. When the barrel is completed, Bookie drives a brass nail into the handle after each rifling job. This allows him to keep track of the number of barrels rifled on each of his rifling benches. See Figure 3 IB

Was this article helpful?

+1 0
Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

There are a lot of things that either needs to be repaired, or put together when youre a homeowner. If youre a new homeowner, and have just gotten out of apartment style living, you might want to take this list with you to the hardware store. From remolding jobs to putting together furniture you can use these 5 power tools to get your stuff together. Dont forget too that youll need a few extra tools for other jobs around the house.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment