Enlarged Sectional View

ASSEMBLED WITH FUZ£ ANO AIMING WHlE

Figure 9-4. Aircraft parachute flare with shade.

A—shipping plug -shade retainer b_ support c—rib retainer i>—-stem

E—LOWER spacer f—r1s5 G—>HACE h—qvj j c kmatth J—FLARE charge K—RELAY charge L—DELAY element

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m—base block assy n—-shock absoaher assy p—shrouds q—thrust spacer r—parachute S- releasing cup disk T—cover releasing cup u—coves v—stabilizing sleeve w—hangwire x —handle assy y—fin stiffener

RAPD il33i5A

Figure 9-4. Aircraft parachute flare with shade.

b. Certain flares used below the aircraft, as in bombardment, are provided with shades (fig. 9-4) to shield bombardiers from the glare.

c. Flares released from aircraft launching tubes or racks are equipped with an arming wire, hangwire, firing lanyard, or rip cord assembly, each of which is attached to the arming pawl of the tube or rack. Flares may be released armed or safe. When the flare is released armed, the hang-wire remains attached to the aircraft and actuates the flare. If released safe, the flare will not function in the air but may ignite on impact. This possibility must be kept in mind when releasing flares over friendly territory. When an arming wire is employed, it remains attached to the aircraft and allows the fuze to arm.

d. Towed flares are used as assembly markers in aircraft flight formation. These flares function like other aircraft flares, except that they are towed by the aircraft at the end of a 60-foot length of steel cable or manila rope.

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