Remington

Austin Powders

Until the spring of 1991, Scot Powder Company marketed Austin powders. All are manufactured from a select grade of nitrocotton, except for Royal Scot and Pearl Scot, which are a single-base type.

Royal Scot. A bulky, but fast-burning, double-base flake-type powder for use in 12 gauge shotshells. It contains some orange-colored granules as an aid to identification.

Pearl Scot. A double-base, flake-type powder of medium burning rate for target and upland game shotshell loads. It contains occasional white flakes for identification.

Solo 1000. A fast-burning, single-base, flake-type powder for use in target shotshell loads, with applications for target loads in handguns.

Solo 1250. A medium fast-burning, single-base, flake-type powder for 12 gauge hunting shotshell loads or target loads in 20 or 28 gauge. You can use it in handgun loads, per supplier's load data booklet. Like Solo 1000, it has exceptionally low levels of muzzle-flash in handguns.

Solo 1500. A single-base, flake-type powder with a slower burning rate. It's suitable for .357, .41, or .44 Magnum and 10mm Auto loads with heavier bullets. You can use Solo 1500 for 10, 12, 16 and 20 gauge hunting loads with lead shot and it has some application for 12 gauge steel shot.

Brigadier 4197. A single-base extruded rifle powder with a relatively fast burning rate. It's suited for varmint loads in the smaller cartridge cases.

Brigadier 3032. A single-base extruded rifle powder with a burning rate slower than Brigadier 4197.

Brigadier 4065. A single-base extruded rifle powder, still slower in burning rate.

Brigadier 4351. A single-base extruded rifle powder with the slowest burning rate of the Brigadier series.

Austin Powder Company has a manual available entitled Shotshell, Handgun and Rifle Reloading Manual.

Alliant Powders

Bulls-eye. A double-base, flake-type powder with one of the fastest burning rates of any powder available to reloaders. It's suitable for target loads in handgun cartridges, and Alliant lists a few loads for it in 12 gauge with 78 ounce of lead shot.

Red Dot. A double-base, flake-type powder with occasional red flakes for identification. Slightly slower in burning rate than Bulls-eye, Red Dot is traditionally a favorite for target shotshell loads. You can use it for target-velocity loads in handgun cartridges.

Green Dot. A double-base, flake-type powder with occasional green flakes for identification. Green Dot is slower in burning speed than Red Dot, and you can use it for target and upland game shotshell loads as well as for handgun cartridges (Figure 43).

Unique. A double-base, flake-type powder with granules of uniform dark gray color. Unique is slower in burning rate than Green Dot, and you can use it in reloading shotshells and handgun cartridges and for light loads in rifle cartridges.

Herco. A double-base, flake-type powder with uniformly dark gray granules. Slower in burning rate than Unique, it's for heavy hunting shotshell loads, and it works quite well in several handgun cartridges, particularly the 9mm Luger.

FIGURE 43—Alliant Green Dot is an example of the flake-type powders. Actually, it's extruded, but it's sliced into much shorter granules than typical extruded powders such as Hodgdon H4831. The manufacturer colors occasional flakes of Green Dot green as an aid to identification.

Hodgdon H110

Blue Dot. A double-base, flake-type powder with occasional blue flakes for identification. Slower in burning speed than Green Dot, it's suitable, per Alliant's listing of load data, for heavy hunting loads in shotshells, as well as the more energetic handgun reloads.

2400. A double-base, flake-type powder with uniformly dark gray granules. It's suitable for .410 bore shotshell loads and magnum handgun cartridges.

Reloader 7. A double-base, extruded propellant for use in rifle cartridges, with occasional applications in handguns. Reloader 7 is the sole survivor of a trio of rifle powders introduced by Hercules (now Alliant) in the mid-1960s that, at the time, also included Reloader 11 and Reloder 21. The numbers had no special relation to the burning speed but supposedly were selected because they're the "three lucky numbers at Las Vegas."

Reloader 12. A double-base, extruded propellant, slower in burning speed than Reloader 7.

Reloader 15. A double-base, extruded propellant, slower in burning rate than Reloader 12, and listed in the Alliant booklet for many medium-sized rifle cartridges.

Reloder 19. A double-base, extruded propellant, slower in burning speed than Reloader 15, and listed for medium to large rifle cartridges.

Reloder 22. A double-base, extruded propellant, slowest in burning rate of the current Alliant line. It's suitable for heavy bullets in large, magnum-type rifle cases.

The 56 page booklet, Reloaders' Guide for Alliant Smokeless Powders, is available at no charge from many dealers who stock the powders. If you can't find a copy locally, request one from Alliant at the address listed earlier.

Hodgdon Powders

Shortly after the end of World War II, Bruce Hodgdon began buying surplus quantities of powder left over from the rather frantic years of that global conflict. He went on to package the powder and resell it, through wholesale and retail outlets. His earliest offering was 4895, used in military loads for the .30-06 Springfield. Hodgdon sold 150 pound kegs of it for $30.00 plus freight! He went on to add 110 used in the .30 M-1 carbine and 4831 that had powered 20mm aircraft cannon cartridges. Along the way, he also marketed BL-C, later replaced by BL-C(2).

With rare exceptions, Hodgdon no longer buys and distributes surplus powders. Hodgdon makes most of their powders "from scratch" at the facilities of Imperial Chemical Industries (ICI) Nobel Explosives Co., Limited, in Scotland. Olin makes most of Hodgdon's Spherical powders. The current line of Hodgdon powders follows, ranked in approximate order of burning rate, from fastest to slowest.

Spherical HP38. A fast-burning spherical powder adapted to light or target loads in a broad range of handgun calibers. It's particularly suitable for target loads in .38 Special.

Spherical Trap 100. A powder adapted to trap, skeet, and similar light loads in 12, 16, and 20 gauge shotshells, with applications for light target loads in handguns.

Spherical HS6. A powder for heavy field loads in shotshells, as well as midrange to heavy handgun loads.

Spherical HS7. A slow-burning powder for magnum shotshell loads in the larger gauges. Rated the best powder for use in the 28 gauge, it's also usable for midrange to heavy handgun loads.

Spherical H110. Originally developed for use in the .30 M-1 Carbine, H110 works well in .410 bore shotshells and magnum handgun loads.

H4227. An extruded powder of fine granulation, similar to IMR 4227, but usually slightly faster in burning rate. You can use H4227 in the .22 Hornet, .222 Remington, and similar rifle cartridges. You can also use it in magnum handgun cartridges, in which it reduces lead fouling with cast bullets.

H4198. An extruded powder at its best in small- to medium-capacity cases. H4227 is useful for lightweight bullets in several rifle cases, and it also works well for reduced loads with cast bullets.

H322. An extruded powder that works well for target loads in rifles with small- to medium-capacity cases.

Spherical BL-C(2). Popular among bench rest shooters, its best performance is in the .222 Remington and similar cases smaller than the .30-06 Springfield.

Spherical H335. Similar to BL-C(2), H335 works well in medium-capacity rifle cases from .222 Remington to .308 Winchester.

H4895. A versatile extruded rifle propellant, useful in almost all cases from .222 Remington through .458 Winchester Magnum. Reduced loads as low as 60 percent of maximum still give decent target accuracy.

Spherical H380. Said to fill the gap between IMR 4320 and IMR 4350, H380 performs extremely well in cartridges such as the .22-250 Remington, .219 Zipper, .22 Swift, the 6mms, .257s, and .30-06 Springfield (Figure 44).

FIGURE 44—Hodgdon H380, shown here greatly enlarged, is an example of Spherical or Ball powders.

FIGURE 44—Hodgdon H380, shown here greatly enlarged, is an example of Spherical or Ball powders.

Powder Dram Equivalent

Spherical H414. A powder that works well in medium-to medium-large-capacity rifle cases, often providing outstanding accuracy. H414 gives good performance with lightweight bullets in large-capacity rifle cases.

H4350. Introduced in April, 1982, H4350 is an extruded number, slightly slower in burning rate than IMR 4350.

Spherical H450. A powder that gives best results in medium- to large-capacity rifle cases. Its burning rate is similar to the 4831 powders.

H4831 Newly Manufactured. A recreation of the original surplus powder, it gives outstanding performance with medium to heavy bullets in 6mm/.243 through magnum rifle cartridges (Figure 45).

FIGURE 45—Hodgdon H4831 is an example of an extruded powder. Note the central perforation in the granule to modulate its burning speed. Powder burns on the surface and the surface of the perforation increase during burning to compensate for the outer surface, which decreases.

FIGURE 45—Hodgdon H4831 is an example of an extruded powder. Note the central perforation in the granule to modulate its burning speed. Powder burns on the surface and the surface of the perforation increase during burning to compensate for the outer surface, which decreases.

Gunpowder Hodgdon

H1000. An extruded rifle powder, quite slow in burning rate and well adapted for use with the heavier bullets in the larger magnum rifle cases.

Spherical H870. A powder adaptable to overbore-capacity magnum cases in diameters from .257 to .300, with heavy bullets.

IMR Powders

IMR is a designation for Improved Military Rifle, once employed by Dupont for several of its rifle powders. Some years ago, Dupont decided to get out of the powder business and sold the operation to IMR Powder Company, which adopted the abbreviation as their corporate moniker. Dupont has used at least two other abbreviations: SR for Sporting Rifle and PB for Porous Base.

Several other suppliers offer powders with numerical designations identical, or closely similar, to those of the IMR series. The burning rates and other properties of such powders aren't necessarily identical to those from IMR, and you shouldn't substitute non-IMR powders when using IMR load data. Rather, you should use load data published by the supplier of the given powder.

The current lineup of IMR powders, ranging from fastest to slowest in burning rates, follows.

"Hi-Skor" 700-X. A double-base, flake-type propellant for use in reloading shotshells and many handgun cartridges. It has occasional flakes colored yellow for identification.

"Hi-Skor" 800-X. A double-base, flake-type propellant for use in shotshells and handgun cartridges, with occasional tan flakes for identification. It's sufficiently slow in burning rate to provide some interesting velocities in magnum handgun cartridges.

PB. A single-base, flake-type propellant for use in shotshells and handgun cartridges. PB sometimes delivers exceptional accuracy in the 9mm Luger cartridge.

SR 7625. A single-base, flake-type propellant for use in shotshells and handgun cartridges.

SR 4756. A single-base, flake-type propellant for use in shotshells and handgun cartridges.

SR 4759. A single-base, extruded propellant, SR 4759 has no application for reloading shotshells, but IMR lists it for a few bottleneck handgun cartridges such as the .221 Remington Fire Ball, with listings for nearly all of their rifle cartridge headings. Other data sources often list SR 4759 for reduced loads in rifle cartridges.

IMR 4227. A single-base, extruded propellant, IMR 4227 is the fastest in burning rate of the IMR series. IMR lists it for use in the .410 bore shotshell, for most of their handgun cartridge headings, and for most of the rifle cartridges, as well.

The remainder of the IMR series, in order of fast to slow burning rates, are as follows.

IMR lists data for powders as slow as IMR 4895 for use in bottleneck handgun cartridges such as the .221 Remington Fire Ball. The remaining four are mostly simon-pure rifle propellants, hardly at their best in barrels shorter than 16 to 18 inches.

Winchester Powders

All of the Winchester powders are Ball-type, and all are the doublebase variety. Winchester continues to distribute a booklet of load data originally published in December, 1985, with periodic updates. A list of their current line of powders, not necessarily ranked from fastest to slowest in burning rates, follows.

231. A fast-burning powder for target and standard loads in handgun cartridges.

29. A moderately slow-burning powder for use in magnum handgun cartridges as well as in .410-bore shotshells.

WSL. The initials stand for Winchester Super Lite, and it's primarily a shotshell propellant with some applications in handgun cartridges, as listed in the current Winchester data booklet.

WST. Winchester Super Target, which replaces their number 452AA for use in shotshells.

540 and 571. Propellants intended primarily for use in shotshells.

748 and 760. A pair of popular rifle propellants.

WAAP. This is the cleanest, lowest charge weight powder Winchester markets for reloading target shotshells.

WSF. This is the propellant of choice for Winchester 20 gauge AA Target Load and 12 gauge 3 34 dram equivalent Super-X load. WSF is an ideal choice to maximize velocities in 12 gauge 1 % ounce and 1 % ounce loads.

WAP. This is a high-velocity, clean burning, low muzzle flash, highly consistent powder for your reloads. WAP has a lower flame temperature than competitive products, which extends barrel life. Ideal for use in competitive action pistol applications and high performance Law Enforcement and self-defense applications.

WMR. This is a low-flame temperature propellant, and has ideal flow characteristics. It's an excellent magnum rifle propellant.

Vihta Vuori Powders

Vihta Vuori has been manufacturing its powders since about 1926. They've only recently become available in the United States.

Their N100 series is a single-base nitrocellulose propellant, ranking from fastest to slowest as follows.

N110. For use in small and medium volume cases with lightweight bullets.

N120. A multipurpose powder for 5.56mm calibers. N130. Suitable for 5.56mm cases with heavier bullets. N133. Especially tailored for the .223 Remington/5.56mm NATO. N135. Especially tailored for the .308 Winchester/7.62mm NATO. N140. Especially tailored for caliber .30 rounds with 155+ grain bullets. N150. For use in medium-bore rifle calibers.

N160. For use in magnum rifle calibers or .30-06 with heavier bullets.

N165. For use in magnum cartridges with heavier bullets.

The following N300 series of porous powders are suitable for handgun or shotgun reloading and are single-base nitrocellulous propellants.

N310. For use in revolvers and smallbore pistols.

N320. For use in revolver and pistols.

N330. Slightly slower for handgun use.

N331. Especially designed for the 9mm Luger.

N340. Slower, for handgun use.

N350. Slower, for handgun use.

3N37. Especially for 9mm handguns.

The high-energy N500 series is a double-base with nitroglycerin added, for use in reloading rifle ammunition and from fastest to slowest, and consists of N540, N550, and N560. It's especially used for 9mm handguns.

You can order the Vihta Vuori Reloading Manual, with data listings from handgun and rifle cartridges, from Kaltron-Pettibone.

Zero In! 3

1. The earlier type of gunpowder was a physical mixture of potassium nitrate plus _______

2. Once you establish the delivery of a _______ by use of a scale, you can rely on it to drop a specific amount of powder, so long as you use the same lot of powder.

3. If the length of a granule of powder is as great as, or greater than its diameter, it's termed an _______ propellant.

4. Powder measures with _______ can deliver any desired charge weight of the given powder.

5. In the early years of reloading, small hand tools called _______ or _______ were quite popular and have been produced until fairly recent times.

6. If the length of a granule of powder is a lot less than its diameter, it's a_propellant.

7. Apart from two basic manufacturing processes, powders differ from each other in terms of .

8. Most presses operate via a revolving shell plate, rather than advancing the turret, with the shell plate taking the place of the usual shell holder.

9. A reliable and accurate powder scale is also sometimes called a scale, as we can also use it to weigh bullets.

10. We call reloading presses that are open at the front_.

Check your answers with those on page 97.

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Responses

  • Carol
    Is Alliant RL 19 a double base propellant?
    8 years ago

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