Table Ballistic data

c. Care, Handling, and Preservation. Exercise care to prevent ammunition boxes from becoming broken or damaged. If they do, repair them immediately. Transfer all original markings to the new parts of the box. Do not open ammunition boxes until the ammunition is to be used. Ammunition removed from the airtight container, particularly in damp climates, is likely to corrode. Protect the ammunition from mud, sand, and water. If the ammunition gets wet or dirty, wipe it off at once with a clean, dry cloth. Wipe off light corrosion as soon as it is discovered. Turn in heavily corroded cartridges. Do not expose ammunition to the direct rays of the sun. If the powder is hot, excessive pressure may be developed when the weapon is fired. Do not oil or grease ammunition. Dust and other abrasives that collect on greasy ammunition are injurious to the operating parts of the gun. Moreover, oiled cartridges produce excessive chamber pressure. Do not fire dented cartridges, cartridges with loose bullets, or otherwise defective rounds.

d. Storage. Small-arms ammunition is not an explosive hazard, but under poor storage conditions it may become a fire hazard. Store ammunition of all classes away from radiators, hot water pipes, and other sources of heat. Whenever possible, store ammunition under cover. If it is necessary to leave ammunition in the open, keep it at least 6 inches off the ground and covered with a double thickness of tarpaulin. Place the tarpaulin so that it gives maximum protection and allows free circulation of air. Dig suitable trenches to prevent water from flowing under the ammunition pile.

e. Miscellaneous Data. Table 1-5 lists the maximum penetration in inches for an armor-piercing cartridge fired from the 45-inch barrel (muzzle velocity, 2,935 feet per second), which in some cases may enhance the leader's selection of targets to engage.

Machine Gun Ballistic Chart

Table 1-5. Maximum penetration for armor-piercing cartridge.

Table 1-6 lists the maximum penetration in inches for a ball cartridge fired from the 45-inch barrel (muzzle velocity, 2,935 feet per second):

Table 1-6 lists the maximum penetration in inches for a ball cartridge fired from the 45-inch barrel (muzzle velocity, 2,935 feet per second):

Clay (100 pounds dry weight/cubic feet)

concrete

Clay (100 pounds dry weight/cubic feet)

concrete

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