Always Unload Your Bt Fully Inspect The Chamber To Make Sure It Does Not Contain Any Shells

2 Open the action.

3 Before installing a tube, check the internal choke tube threads in the muzzle, as well as the threads on the Invector choke tube to be sure they arc clean. Lightly oil the threads with an oil like Browning Oil.

4 Using your Fingers, screw the appropriate tube into the muzzle end of the barrel, tapered end First, notched end outward. When it becomes finger-tight, use the Invector choke tube wrench to firmly scat the tube.

THE INVECTOR CHOKE TUBE SHOULD BE PERIODICALLY CHECKED TO ASSURE THAT IT IS TIGHT AND FIRMLY SEATED. BEFORE CHECKING, FOLLOW THE SAFETY GUIDELINES OUTLINED PREVIOUSLY.

Replacement and additional tubes and wrenches are available from your Browning dealer, or by writing to the Browning Consumer Department,

One Browning Place, Morgan, Utah 84050-9326. 801-876-2711.

Canadian customers please call or write to Browning Canada Sports Ltd./Ltee, 5617 Chemin St-Franijois, St. Laurent, Quebec, Canada H4S 1W6. (514) 333-7261.

INVECTOR TUBE IDENTIFICATION —

To identify individual Invector tubes, refer to the abbreviated indications on the side of the tube, or use the identification notches located on the top rim of each tube. (Sec Figure 21).

SELECTING THE CORRECT INVECTOR CHOKE TUBE —

Although your BT-100 is designed solely for target use with lead shot loads, the Invector choke system is fully compatible with factor)' steel shot loads as well. For your information only, on the chart above we have included steel shot information in addition to the lead shot choke/pattern specifications you will need. Both lead and steel designations have proven necessary for hunters using other Browning guns with Standard Invector and Invector-Plus tubes because in any given tube, steel shot gives a different pattern than lead shot. In fact, even larger steel shot diameters result in different patterns than smaller steel shot sizes. Each designation is inscribed on each choke tube. Remember, you will only need to refer to the lead shot designations when selecting a proper tube for your BT-100, as your new shotgun is unsuitable for any hunting use.

Cleaning Suggestions_

The BT-100 is a target gun, and as such will function better and more reliably over a longer period of time if it is properly maintained and kept clean.

BEFORE PERFORMING ANY CLEANING PROCEDURES, ALWAYS MAKE CERTAIN THERE IS NO SHELL IN THE CHAMBER.

You should clean your BT-100 after ever)' day of shooting, and more often if it becomes excessively dirty. A minimum cleaning includes wiping down the action and oiling key parts. Most regular maintenance will also include cleaning the barrel. If you encounter a function problem (tight action when closing, etc.) be sure to give your gun a thorough clean ing, to see if it solves the problem, before seeking the services of a Browning Recommended Service Center or the Browning Service Facility in Arnold, Missouri, or a competent gunsmith.

A light cleaning means oiling and wiping down. It can be accomplished with the barrel still attached. A full cleaning requires that you remove the barrel and forearm. To clean your firearm follow the general outline below:

CLEANING PROCEDURES —

BE CERTAIN YOUR GUN'S CHAMBER IS UNLOADED. ALWAYS WEAR PROTECTIVE SAFETY GLASSES DURING ALL ASSEMBLY, DISASSEMBLY AND CLEANING PROCEDURES. KEEP AMMUNITION AWAY FROM THE CLEANING AREA. DO NOT TEST THE FUNCTION OF YOUR FIREARM WITH LIVE AMMUNITION.

1 Remove the barrel and forearm from the receiver as explained previously.

2 Using a shotgun cleaning rod, with tip and patch large enough for a snug fit in the bore, insert the rod and a lightly oiled patch in the breech end of the barrel and run back and forth several times.

3 Inspect the bore from both ends for leading and plastic residue. Plastic residue is often left in the bore from the shot cups in modern shotshells. Leading and plastic residue will appear as longitudinal streaks and are usually more predominant near the muzzle and just forward of the chamber. A normal amount of either is common and is not serious.

4 If leading or plastic residue seems excessive you can remove it by brushing the bore with a brass brush. Soak the brush or spray the bore with powder solvent first. Scrub until clean. To prevent bristles from breaking off, push the brush fully through each time before pulling it back through.

5 If your shotgun has barrel ports, carefully clean them with a rag soaked in powder solvent. You may need to scrape residues from the holes with something like a small screwdriver, pipe cleaner or small brush. If so, be careful not to mar the blueing on the barrel's outer surface, or scratch the inside of the barrel.

6 After all leading and residues have been removed run a clean dry patch through the bore. Follow this with a final, lightly oiled patch.

7 Wipe all metal surfaces of the receiver, forearm and barrel with clean rag. Then lightly oil your gun at the points described in step l under "Assembly Procedures." Regular, light oiling is extremely important to the durability and reliable operation of your shotgun.

Remember, the broad, polished, finely fitted surfaces of the receiver and forearm mechanisms (the ejector slide, the hinge pin, and on each side of the barrel receiver walls), must always have a thin film of oil. Quality firearm oil like Browning Oil works best for this purpose. Do not use general purpose water displacement type oils.

8 INSPECT THE BARREL AND CHAMBER TO BE CERTAIN NO PATCHES HAVE INADVERTENTLY BEEN LEFT IN THEM. REMOVE ANY THA T REMAIN.

9 Wipe all wood surfaces with Browning Oil or a quality furniture polish, but not both.

OTHER CLEANING SUGGESTIONS —

Never pour large quantities of oil into the receiver or other parts. It can drain down to the wood and soften it — and cause permanent damage and loosening of the stock.

It is very important that the chamber of your shotgun be cleaned thoroughly and promptly after shooting plastic shot-shells. DO NOT LEAVE A DISCHARGED (EMPTY) SHELL IN THE CHAMBER FOR ANY LENGTH OF TIME

The chemical composition of many plastic shells contains moisture which can "sweat" out of the shell and onto the chamber surface, and possibly cause corrosion and rust.

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