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Fig. 19 Counterbore

Fig. 19 Counterbore

Rides or Scales—These come under the headings of steel scales, flexible scales, boxwood rules, etc. Everyone is familiar with this form of measuring instrument. Purchase one 6-inch and one 12-inch flexible-scale rule graduated in sixty-fourths and hundredths. Also one heavy yardstick and a five-foot folding rule to measure any desired length. The 12-inch flexible rule can be used for laying out checkering and other laying-out work, also to secure lengths or distances to space telescopc blocks; in fact, these two scales arc used more than any other measuring instrument.

Saws-—Under this heading are hand-saws, hacksaws, jewelers' hack-saws, coping saws, etc. For the wood-working department you will need two hand-saws, one rip-saw, and one cut-off saw. In metal work you will need a hack-saw measuring about 12 inches. There are many different kinds of hack-saw frames and it is best to suit your own taste in this respect. However, be sure to obtain the best, as a hack-saw plays a great part in the gunsmith's trade. Buy only the best blades, such as the Atkins silver-steel blades with teeth from 20 to 32 per inch, the fine teeth for thin metal and the coarse teeth for wood and steel. Also get a jewelers' hack-saw frame with a large selection of blades. These blades only cost 10<* per dozen, so have a dozen of each grade on hand. A coping saw is also very useful in wood work, and these arc very reasonably priced.

Scribcrs—The best ones arc made from dental burrs by grinding a very sharp point on one of the small burrs; then stone the point to a sharp edge, and make a small round handle from either ebony, fiber, or buffalo horn. The ones you buy are much too heavy and your lines will vary when taken from a straight edge or scale. A very good knife-edge scriber can be made from a worn hack-saw blade by grinding off the teeth and grinding the end to an angle similar to a fur-cutters knife, and honing it to a keen edge. This is used in laying out lines on wood work, such as you lay out for the beginning of a stock.

Straight Edge—Figure 20 illustrates a straightedge. These can be made of thin hard wood. One of their uses is to determine the amount of drop and pitch of a rifle. This is easily measured by fastening a thin piece 10 inches long transversely at one end.

Scratch Brush—This is used to prepare surfaces for the bluing operation and is obtainable at gun-parts supply houses. See Directory.

Screw-drivers—These are among the most essential tools, so by all means have a good supply, ranging from the small jeweler's screw-driver to a large long one for removing butt screws, such as hold the action to the stock in Remington, Ballard, and Winchester rifles.

The best screw-drivers are those made frum octagon chisel steel, short in length and with a large file handle attached. Very good ones are also made from drill rod, but when it comes to strength, the octagon chisel steel holds up best of all. Spend a day making up a good set, such as Figure 21 illustrates. You will find that it pays in the end, for screws that are put in at the factory are very tight and their removal requires a driver properly fitted to the width of the slot. If it does not fit and the driver should slip, the result will be a badly marred head. You will find that on all shotguns the screw slots are very narrow and the screws very tight. These screws have been set up with a screw-driver bit used in a brace. You must then make a set of these from octagon chisel steel with the end filed to fit the screw and without any taper, for when you taper a screw-driver bit it

Fig. 20

Straight-edge for checking pitch o- riJles and shotgun»

Fig. 20

Straight-edge for checking pitch o- riJles and shotgun»

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