Hunting and Sport Rifles

Weapon

Malf.

Dmg. SS Acc.

1/2Dmg. Max. Wt. RoF Shots ST Rcl. Cost HO

H&H Double Express

.600 Nitro Express

crit.

10d® 16 7

800 5 000 7.1 2- 2 13 -6 10 000€ -7

The Holland & Holland Double Express was probably the most powerful commercial hunting rifle, from its introduction in 1903 until the .460 Weatherby Magnum round came on sale in 1958. It was commercially available only in expensive English double-barreled rifles, usually breech-loading. They were normally sold only in three places: at the gunmakers in London, in the most exclusive and expensive sporting-goods stores in the major cities of the civilized world and in Africa. The 2 000 B price-tag is definitely the bottom of the scale. That is the price you would pay if you just happened to find one on the rack at the gunmakers to suit you. The markup by sporting goods dealers was 200 % or 300 % minimum. A custom-ordered weapon might cost only 100 % over the listed price but the wait for delivery is at least one year. In Africa it was sometimes possible to get a bargain in used guns, frequently because the owner had made one mistake too many with a rhino or an elephant. More recent prices for a H&H .600 Double ran between 6 000 B and 15 000 B for a used gun. In 1974, the last .600 Double Express was produced. In 1974, a .700 Double Express was built for an undisclosed price for an Amercian collector (Dmg. nd©, Rcl. -7). The Double Express can fire both barrels simultaneously (roll against HT-5 to avoid being physically stunned for 1d seconds and nearly deaf for 1d hours).

Weapon Malf. Dmg. SS Acc. V2Dmg. Max. Wt. RoF Shots ST Rcl. Cost HO

Martini-Henry crit. 5d® 15 7 600 2000 2.7 1/4 1 10 -2 400€ -7 .450 Martini-Henry

The Martini-Henry was a single shot breech loading rifle adopted by the British army in 1871. It combined Friedrich von Martini's loading mechanism (a self-cocking hammerless design) with Alexander Henry's rifling. It used a similar cartridge to that used with the Snider-Enfield rifle (which was replaced by the Martini-Henry), but at a slightly reduced caliber. There were several models produced, the original rifle, modernized versions MkII, MkIII and MkIV, a short carbine version, also in multiple models. The Martini-Henry was typical of the heavy, breech-loading single-shot cartridge rifles of the late 19th century and it was a very widespread gun; the British and Indian armies used it from 1871 until well into the 20th century and the action was still used for target and hunting rifles at the end of that century.

Weapon

Malf.

Dmg. SS Acc.

1/2Dmg. Max. Wt.

RoF Shots ST Rcl. Cost HO

Remington Creedmore

crit.

5d® 15 14

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