A Equipment Needed

One sighting bar complete for each machine gun crew. One sighting target that measures 1 inch X 2 inches X 48 inches long. The sighting target is secured 5 1 2 inches away from one end (it should be moveable). The eyepiece is secured on the other end. The peep sight is secured 20 1 2 inches from the sighting target and 22 inches from the eyepiece (Figure F-1). b. Conduct. The instructor shows a sighting bar to the machine gun crews, points out its parts, and explains its use as follows (1) The...

Structure

This proposed training program is subdivided into the following periods b. Preliminary marksmanship training and dry fire. c. Proficiency (performance) examination. d. 10-meter zero practice and qualification. e. Transition range, field zero, and practice fire. f. Transition range qualification fire. g. Night zero and instructional fire. After a brief description of the machine gun, soldiers receive the following instruction a. Period 1--Introduction. Disassembly and assembly (practice...

ABipod

The bulk of overgarments may require adjustments to the position for stability and comfort. A consistent stock weld is difficult to maintain because of the shape of the protective masks. The gunner has to hold his head in an awkward position to see through the sight. If necessary, he may cant the weapon to overcome this situation. This procedure relieves the neck muscles and places the eye on line with the center of the rear sight. (2) Aim. The gunner may have to rotate...

Station Engage A Linear And A Deep Target

This station normally has six setups. Each should have a punchboard-type training aid or a blackboard and chalk. a. The individual is required to show his point of initial lay, direction of manipulation, and extent of manipulation for a linear (single machine gun) and a deep target (pair of machine guns). The individual is also asked what rate of fire he would use to engage these targets if the rate were not stated in the fire command. b. The following statement should be read at this station...

Station Perform Immediate Action

This station normally has six setups. Each has a cleaning rod and a bipod-mounted machine gun with bolt forward, cover closed, and safety on F position. a. The grader should ask the individual to perform immediate action as he would if a round were in the chamber and would not fire providing the barrel was not hot enough to cause a cook off. b. The following statement should be read at this station DURING THIS PERIOD, YOU WILL BE ORGANIZED INTO FIVE GROUPS AND REQUIRED TO GO THROUGH THE STEPS...

Station Place Direction And Elevation Readings On The Te Mechanism

Each has one tripod-mounted machine gun complete with pintle and platform group and traversing-and-elevating mechanism. a. For the first direction reading, the grader should ensure that the traversing slide is an even 5-mil graduation on the traversing bar. The gunner is required to place 1 to 4 mils on the traversing handwheel for example, L242. This requires the gunner to center the traversing mechanism before he can place the next direction reading on it....

B Tripod

When firing at predetermined targets with the weapon laid on each target, there are not differences in steady position at night as compared to day. However, firing at night at targets of opportunity requires modifications. The gunner is required to use weapon-target alignment techniques. He must align the weapon on the target and look over the sights. His head is higher and his lower jaw is lightly on the stock if at all. With night vision devices, the gunner must position...

BDay to

Inspect the weapon and aiming device to ensure the aiming device is mounted securely to the weapon. A review of clearing or misfire procedures is important. Let the soldiers use dummy rounds to practice correcting malfunctions with their eyes closed or during limited visibility. (2) Boresight Aiming Device to Weapon. Each soldier boresights the weapon and aiming device at a range of 10 meters. If a bore light is not available, then 25-meter zero the weapon and sight by...

BTripod

Modifications are similar to those in bipod firing. There are two other points of importance. Manipulating the T& E with gloves on is more difficult because the feel of the handwheel differs. The gunner may not sense the same control as without gloves. Second, hearing is impaired. Together, reduced sense of touch and hearing impairment make T& E manipulations especially difficult. For these reasons, adjustments may be considerably slower. (2) Aim. Unlike the bipod,...

Caution

When mounting an AN PAQ-4 to the mounting bracket, make sure that the hole for the screw in the AN PAQ-4 is aligned and flush against the bracket screw. If not, the screw will strip the threads in the screw hole of the AN PAQ-4 and prevent use with the machine gun. (a) On the M60 machine gun bracket (Figure G-8), remove the M60 hinge pin latch and hinge pin from the over assembly by pressing on the latch (open end of pin) with an empty cartridge case, and separates the latch and pin. Place the...

Clearing Procedures

The first step in maintenance is to clear the M240B (Figure 3-9). This applies in all situations, not just after firing. The gunner must always assume the M240B is loaded. To clear the M240B, the gunner performs the following procedures a. Move the safety to the fire F position. b. With his right hand, (palm up) pulls the cocking handle to the rear, ensuring the bolt is locked to the rear (bipod mode). c. Return the cocking handle to its forward position. d. Place the safety on safe S e. Raise...

Components

(10) Drive spring rod assembly. (11) Bolt operating rod assembly. (14) Tripod assembly (not shown). Provides energy for returning bolt and operating rod assembly to firing position. Provides feeding stripping, chambering, firing, extracting, and ejecting of cartridges using propellant gases for power. Feeds linked belt, positions and holds cartridges in position for stripping, feeding, and chambering. Top rail configuration allows mounting of optical and electronic sights. Serves as guide for...

Componentspurposes

Consists of the barrel, flash suppressor, carrying handle, heat shield, front sight assembly, and gas-regulator plug. Houses the cartridge for firing and directs the projectile. (2) Heat shield assembly. Protects the gunner's hand from a hot barrel. (3) Buttstock buffer assembly Composite buttstock buffer housing that contains spring and buffer and spade grip washers to absorb recoil from bolt and operating rod assembly buttstock and assembly at the end of recoil movement....

Cycle Of Functioning

Crew members can recognize and correct stoppages when they know how the weapon functions. The weapon functions automatically as long as ammunition is fed into it and the trigger is held to the rear. Each time a round is fired, the parts of the weapon function in a cycle or sequence. Many of the actions occur at the same time and are separated only for teaching purposes. The sequence of functioning is known as the cycle of functioning. a. The cycle starts when the first round of the belt is...

D MB Machine

Before zeroing and qualifying with the AN PAQ-4, the gunner must mount the sight onto his weapon. The M240B machine gun has a rail mount already attached to the cover assembly. (a) Install the sight on the M240B rail mount by loosening the mounting knob located on the left side. (b) Position the sight in a slot on the rail mount. Any slot can be used as long as the mount does not hang over the edge of the rail. (c) Hand tighten the knob (clockwise) on the mount until a...

Danger

WHEN OPENING THE FEED COVER ON A HOT GUN, MAKE SURE THE WEAPON IS ON THE GROUND AWAY FROM YOUR FACE. WITH THE WEAPON ON YOUR SHOULDER, POSSIBLE DEATH OR INJURY COULD OCCUR IF A ROUND GOES OFF WHEN THE COVER IS RAISED. e. Raises the cover and feed mechanism assembly, and conducts the five-point safety check for brass, links, or ammunition (1) Checks the feed pawl assembly under the feed cover. (2) Checks the feed tray assembly. (3) Lifts the feed tray assembly and inspects the chamber. (4)...

Do not attempt to remove the handguard retaining pin completely It is a captured pin

Removing the Buttstock and Buffer Assembly Group. To remove the buttstock and buffer assembly (Figure 1-16, page 1-15), use a cartridge or the spring guide rod to push the lowermost retaining pin on the rear of the receiver to the left. It is a captured pin it is not removable. Remove the buttstock and shoulder assembly by pulling them rearward, while supporting the trigger mechanism. Figure 1-16. Removal of the buttstock and buffer assembly. Figure 1-16. Removal of the buttstock and buffer...

Do Not Interchange The Barrel Assembly Or The Bolt Assembly From One Weapon To Another If You Do So It May Result In

M60 machine gun, bipod- and tripod-mounted. Figure 2-1. M60 machine gun, bipod- and tripod-mounted. ball, tracer, armor-piercing, blank, dummy. Armor-piercing is not authorized for training. Length of the M60 43.5 inches Weight of the M60 23 pounds Weight of tripod mount M122 with traversing and elevating mechanism and pintle 16 pounds Maximum range 3,725 meters Maximum effective range 1,100 meters with tripod and T& E meters meters meters meters Maximum extent of grazing fire...

Do not store the ANPAQ with batteries installed

Loosen the mounting knob on the left side of the bracket, then lift up on the sight to remove it from the M240B machine gun. (a) Adjust the bore light, if necessary. Move the target to a distance of 2 meters. Mark the location of the laser dot. Slowly rotate the bore light one half turn. Note the new location of the laser dot. Adjust the windage and elevation until the laser dot moves halfway back to its original location. Continue the procedure until the laser dot...

Do not try to force the cocking handle to the rear with your foot or a heavy object This could damage the weapon

(2) If the weapon is hot enough to cause a cookoff, moves all soldiers a safe distance from the weapon and keeps them away for 15 minutes. (3) After the gun has cooled, opens the cover and disassembles the gun. Ensures rearward pressure is kept on the cocking handle until the buffer is removed. (The assistant gunner helps the gunner do this.) (4) Removes the round or fired cartridge. Uses cleaning rod or ruptured cartridge extractor if necessary. (a) In a training situation, after completing...

Documents Needed

These documents must be available to the intended uses of this publication. Policies and Procedures for Training, Target Practice and Combat. 15 October 1983. Equipment Inspection and Maintenance Worksheet. April 1979. Standard Range Card (LRA). February 1986. Scorecard for M249, M60 M240B Machine Guns. October 2002. 10-Meter Boresight Offset Target. October 2002. Army Electronic Library. 1 July 2002. Training Standards for Weapon Training. September 1990. NBC Decontamination. 23 July 1992....

Machine Gun In The Defense

Machine gun fire is distributed in width and depth in a defensive position. The leader can use machine guns to subject the enemy to increasingly devastating fire from the initial phases of his attack, and to neutralize any partial successes the enemy might attain by delivering intense fires in support of counterattacks. The machine gun's tremendous firepower is what enables the unit to hold ground. This is what makes them the backbone or framework of the defense. a. The units' defense centers...

Machine Gun On A Security Mission

Security includes all command measures to protect against surprise, observation, and annoyance by the enemy. The principal security measures against ground forces include employment of security patrols and detachments covering the front flanks and rear of the units' most vulnerable areas. The composition and strength of these detachments depends on the size of the main body, its mission, and the nature of the opposition expected. The presence of machine guns with security detachments augments...

Employment

Despite their Post-Civil War development, modern machine guns did not exhibit their full potential in battle until World War I. Although the machine gun has changed, the role of the machine gunner has not. The mission of machine guns in battle is to deliver fires when and where the leader wants them in both the offense and defense. Machine guns rarely, if ever, have independent missions. Instead, they provide their unit with accurate, heavy fires to accomplish the mission. This appendix...

Second Sighting And Aiming Exercise

The purpose of the second sighting and aiming exercise is to apply the preceding lesson to actual alignment of the machine gun sights on a target 25 meters away. a. Equipment Needed One Basic machine gun target placed 25 meters away, with the reverse (blank) side showing. One Sighting target, 24 inches long 1 inch X 1 inch, a 3-inch square piece of wood painted black with a small 1 4-inch hole in the center (Figure F-2).

Third Sighting And Aiming Exercise

The purpose of the third sighting and aiming exercise is to show the importance of uniform and correct aiming and to instill in the gunners a sense of exactness. This exercise can be used to check the consistency of the aiming and placement of a three-round shot group in a dry-fire environment. a. Equipment Needed One Machine gun. One Basic machine gun target placed at a distance of 25 meters away with the reverse (blank) side showing. One Sighting target (24 inches long 1 inch X 1 inch, a...

Training Devices And Exercises

The marksmanship training devices in this appendix are available to aid in sustainment training when used with the appropriate training strategies. These devices are beneficial when ammunition is limited for training or practice. Some training devices are complex and costly, but others are relatively simple and cheap to make. Devices and aids can be used alone or in combination. Individuals or squads can sustain or practice basic marksmanship skills and fundamentals with devices and aids.

Figure Adjusting aiming point method

The effects of wind vary depending on changes in speed and direction. Wind is classified by the direction it is blowing in relationship to the firer and target line. The clock system is used to indicate wind direction and value (Figure 4-9). a. Clock System. Winds that blow from the left (9 o'clock) or right (3 o'clock) are called full-value winds, because they have the most effect on the round. Winds that blow at an angle from the front or rear area are called half-value winds, because they...

Figure Effects of winds

NOTE When in doubt, the gunner aims the initial burst directly at the center base of the target and, using the techniques of observation and adjustment of fire, adjusts the fire onto the target. b. Wind Measurement. Wind is highly variable and sometimes quite different at the firing position than at the target position. Even though the wind is blowing hard at the firing position, trees, brush, or terrain could protect the path of the round. The wind can vary by several miles per hour between...

Figure Eight major groups

The operating rod group (Figure 1-10), operating rod spring, slide assembly, piston assembly, and bolt assembly consists of the spring guide rod. (1) To remove the operating rod, pull the upper retaining pin at the rear of the receiver to the left. Allow the buttstock to pivot downward and place it on a surface to support the weapon for disassembly. (2) To release the operating rod assembly from the positioning grooves inside the receiver, hold the weapon...

Figure F EST

The EST 2000 is a modular system with an operational size of 35 feet by 35 feet by 8 feet high for a 10-lane system. Training programs include standard Army courses of fire, shoot-don't shoot decision training, and static-squad or element collective defensive training for infantry, scouts, engineers, military police, and CS or CSS. Basis of issue is one 15-lane EST 2,000 for each OSUT or BCT battalion supporting Initial Entry Training (IET) and one 10-lane EST 2,000 for each brigade-size...

Figure G Centering the markings

(3) To move the point of impact to the right, turn the windage adjustment screw (2) counterclockwise with the arrow marked on the dial. (4) To move the point of impact to the left, turn the windage adjustment screw (2) clockwise opposite to the arrow. (5) To move point of impact up, turn the elevation adjustment screw (1) counterclockwise (right) with the direction of the arrow marked and UP. (6) To move the point of impact down, turn the elevation adjustment screw (1) clockwise (left) opposite...

Figure G M hinge pin replacement

(f) Replace the cover of the M249 so that the slot in the cover lines up with the holes in the receiver group. (g) Push the MWTS hinge pin through the slot and the spring. (h) Secure the MWTS hinge pin by rotating the hook-retaining pin upward (over the hinge pin) and replacing the retaining clip on the left side of the pin. Close the cover of the weapon. (i) Place the grooves on the front of the bracket over the edges of the MWTS hinge pin and rotate the bracket downward onto the cover. Ensure...

Figure G Mounting the MWTS on the M

(d) Remove the retaining clip from the M249 mounting bracket (Figure G-27). (e) Remove the MWTS hinge pin from the mounting bracket and replace it with the M249 hinge pin (Figure G-28, page G-29). Secure it to the mounting bracket by replacing the retaining clip (the one from the mounting bracket).

Figure G Mwts configurations

The scanner reflects the IR light received from the telescope on the detective assembly. The detective assembly senses the IR light and converts it to video. The sensor's electronics condition the video for display on the LED array. The LED array illuminates the IR image along with the reticle. The light from the LED array is reflected off the scanner to form an image at the eyepiece. The only difference between the MWTS and the HWTS are the telescopes, which are different...

Figure G Operation of the button switch

The cable switch (Figure G-14) is used when the AN PEQ-2A is mounted on a weapon. The switch plugs into the back of the AN PEQ-2A assembly. Pressing the button or pad at the end of the cable switch causes the AN PEQ-2A to turn on in the operational mode selected by the mode select switch. When the button is released, the AN PEQ-2A turns off. If continuous operation of the AN PEQ-2A is desired, pressing the cable switch twice in rapid succession latches the AN PEQ-2A to ON. The...

Figure G Reticle aiming point target aiming point and shot group

After a boresight has been established, the gunner moves back to a 25-meter firing position. He affixes another 25-meter zero target to the back of a 10-meter machine gun target and fires three rounds. (a) AN PVS-4 (M60 and M240B) The gunner locates and triangulates the center of the shot group. From the center of the shot group, he adjusts the reticle to move the center of the shot group to a point 8 cm below and 2 cm right of the target aiming point. This...

Figure Remove the blank firing attachment

Care of the M240B While Using the BFA. A buildup of carbon inside the weapon causes friction between the movi00ng parts. Carbon deposits build up rapidly when blanks are fired. When these deposits become excessive, stoppages occur. Therefore, the weapon must be kept clean, especially the gas system and chamber, during blank firing. To get the best performance with the BFA, the gunner performs the following (1) Inspects the weapon for damaged parts, excessive wear, cleanliness, and proper...

Fire Adjustment

The gunner initially sets his sights with the range to the target, lays on the target (sight alignment and sight picture on the center base of the target), fires a burst, and observes the strike of the rounds or flight of the tracers. When the initial burst is correct, he continues to fire until the target is covered. He must regain a good sight picture before each burst when using the bipod. When using the tripod, the gunner makes a rapid check of the sight picture after each traverse and...

Description

This paragraph gives a description of the AN PEQ-2A along with its accessories (Figure G-10). This paragraph also describes how to install and operate the AN PEQ-2A. The TPIAL projects an infrared laser beam that cannot be seen with the eye but can be seen with night vision devices. It is capable of projecting a much wider infrared illuminating beam from an integral illuminator. The TPIAL works with night vision goggles and mounts on various weapons with mounting brackets and adapters. Leaders...

G ZERO of Bore Light To Weapon

Before boresighting the weapon system, make sure the bore light is first zeroed to the weapon. Take a flashlight and shine it through the barrel of the weapon and at 10 meters mark the spot that the flashlight is shining on. Then, without moving the weapon, fire one round. The impact of the round and the mark made with the flashlight should be the same. This procedure is the same principle used when zeroing the bore light to the weapon. This procedure is nothing more than aligning the visible...

General Disassembly

The gunner performs general disassembly, which is removing and replacing the eight major groups (Figure 3-10). (The unit armorer performs detailed disassembly. Disassembly beyond what is explained in this manual is prohibited, except by ordnance personnel.) During general disassembly, the gunner clears the weapon. He ensures the bolt is forward before disassembly, and he places each part on a clean, flat surface such as a table or mat. This aids in assembly in reverse order and avoids the loss...

Meter Target Offset

To mark the proper 25-meter target offset do the following a. Use only M16A2 300-meter zero targets. b. Find the correct target template for your weapon configuration. c. Count the number of squares starting from the center of the 300-meter zeroing silhouette. d. Mark the designated strike point by drawing a small circle at the appropriate number of squares from the center of the 300-meter zeroing silhouette. e. Draw a 4-centimeter by 4-centimeter square keeping the designated strike point...

Immediate Action

Immediate action is action taken to reduce a stoppage without looking for the cause. Immediate action should be taken in the event of a misfire or a cook off. A misfire is the failure of a chambered round to fire. Such failure can be due to an ammunition defect or faulty firing mechanism. A cook off is the firing of a round due to the heat of a hot barrel and not to the firing mechanism. Cook offs can be avoided by applying immediate action within 10 seconds of a failure to fire. The gunner...

Inspection For Bipod Fire

An inspection of equipment is made at the beginning of each exercise. a. Command. After the crew is formed for crew drill, the leader commands INSPECT EQUIPMENT BEFORE FIRING, BIPOD. At the command, each crew member inspects his equipment as explained below. (1) Inspection by Gunner. The gunner inspects the ammunition first. He ensures that the ammunition is properly linked and free of dirt and corrosion, and that the double link is up (ready for loading). After he inspects the ammunition, he...

Loading

To load the M249, the weapon must be cleared as described. (With the feed cover raised, the gunner makes sure his face is not exposed to the open chamber area while loading.) (Figure 1-30). a. Belt. When loading belted ammunition (Figure 1-31), always cant the weapon to the right. Make sure the open side of the links is facing down, and place the lead link tab or first round of the belt in the tray groove against the cartridge stop. The rounds should be placed flat across the feed tray. With...

M Machine

The 5.56-mm M249 machine gun supports the soldier in both the offense and defense. The M249 provides a medium volume of close and continuous fire the soldier needs to accomplish the mission. With it, units can engage the enemy along with the capability of individual weapons with controlled and accurate fire. The medium-range, close defensive, and final protective fires delivered by the M249 MG form an integral part of a unit's defensive fires. Although the M249 MG is described here as a machine...

Maintenance Procedures

Maintenance of the M240B requires certain actions to be taken before, during, and after firing. (2) Inspect the weapon as outlined in operator's TM. (1) Change the barrels. Changing the barrel prolongs the life of both barrels. (2) Periodically inspect the weapon to ensure that it is properly lubricated. (3) When malfunctions or stoppages occur, follow the procedures in Section IV. (1) Clear and clean the weapon immediately. (2) Every 90 days during inactivity, clean and lubricate the weapon...

Malfunctions

A malfunction occurs when a mechanical failure causes the weapon to fire improperly. Neither defective ammunition nor improper operation by the gunner is considered a malfunction. If cleaning and lubricating the weapon does not fix the problem, then the gunner turns it in to the unit armorer. Table 2-3 shows malfunctions, their probable causes, and the corrective actions. Clean gas regulator, piston, and cylinder. Lubricate. Worn or broken operating rod sear notch. Sear installed backwards....

Placement Into Action Tripod

The leader commands and signals MACHINE GUN TO BE MOUNTED HERE, FRONT, ACTION. (Figure 4-20.) ATTACHING THE TRAVERSING AND ELEVATING MECHANISM ATTACHING THE TRAVERSING AND ELEVATING MECHANISM Figure 4-20. Placing the machine gun into action. Figure 4-20. Placing the machine gun into action. a. Upon the command ACTION, the ammunition bearer stands, holds the tripod with his right hand, and moves forward to the position. He kneels on his right knee and rests the shoes of the rear tripod legs on...

Procedures For Changing The Barrel Bipod

To ensure proficiency and speed in changing barrels, the barrel changing process is included in crew drill. When the gunner has reported UP and the assistant gunner has signaled READY, the leader commands CHANGE BARRELS. a. The gunner ensures that the bolt is to the rear, puts the safety on S, and puts the stock on the ground. Next, he moves his left hand to the top of the stock to ensure the weapon stays parallel to the ground. He puts his right hand under the handguard forearm assembly help...

Procedures For Changing The Barrel Tripod

When the gunner has reported UP and the assistant gunner has signaled READY, the leader commands CHANGE BARRELS. a. The gunner ensures that the bolt is to the rear, puts the safety on S. He also assists the assistant gunner in changing the barrel, if needed. b. The assistant gunner (wearing the heat protective mitten) unlocks the barrel locking lever, removes the barrel, and places the barrel on the spare barrel case. He holds the spare barrel inserts it into the machine gun. c. The gunner...

Section I Introduction

Marksmanship begins with nonfiring individual skill proficiency and concludes with collective proficiency firing under demanding conditions. The objectives of machine gun marksmanship training are to produce gunners that are thoroughly capable of the following a. Accurate Initial Burst. Obtaining an accurate initial burst of fire on the target is essential to good marksmanship. This requires the gunner to estimate range to the target, set the sights, and apply the fundamentals of marksmanship...

Section Iii Application Of Fire

Application of fire consists of the methods the gunner uses to cover a target area. Training these methods of applying fire can be accomplished only after the soldiers have learned how to recognize the different types of targets they may find in combat, how to distribute and concentrate their fire, and how to maintain the proper rate of fire. Normally, the gunner is exposed to two types of targets in the squad or platoon sector enemy soldiers and supporting automatic weapons. These targets have...

Station Checklist Perform Field Zeroing

Placed the range setting on 500 meters. 2. Made corrections for deflection. 3. Made corrections for elevation. 4. Simulated firing the second burst and hitting the target. 5. Completed task in 5 minutes. 1. Placed the range setting on 500 meters. 4. Simulated firing the second burst and hitting the target.

Stoppages

A stoppage is any interruption in the cycle of functioning caused by faulty action of the weapon or faulty ammunition. Stoppages are classified by their relationship to the cycle of functioning. Table 2-4 shows types of interruptions or stoppages, their probable causes, and the corrective actions. Remove cartridge IAW TM 9-1005-224-10. Clear barrel and clean and lubricate as required. Foreign matter in chamber of receiver. Broken or damaged firing pin or firing pin spring. Broken or deformed...

Stuck Barrel

Stuck barrel is the result of the machine gun crew not properly cleaning the gas cylinder and gas regulator plug. During training or range firing the M240B should be cleared, disassemble and cleaned immediately. In combat, the M240B should be cleaned as soon as possible. The gun crew performs the following actions, only if the weapon can not be properly cleaned at that time. a. Pulls the cocking handle to the rear, locking the bolt. Returns the cocking handle and places the safety to SAFE. b....

Table F Marksmanship training capabilities and limitations

178 squad tactical exercises against varying enemy targets, in terrain that varies from woodlands, desert, urban, and mountains that are typical of terrain found throughout the world. Train and sustain defensive operations. Train and sustain overwatch operations. Train and sustain ambush operations. Restricted interaction with on-screen NOTE No effects of weather and firing position distances under squad leader and fire-team leader control.

Table F Shootdont shoot training capabilities and limitations

The EST trains many skills, but it is not intended to replace live qualification or MILES force-on-force tactical training. Its many capabilities are clearly definable, but its limitations preclude total elimination of training ammunition resources. Training on the EST is planned to save ammunition resources, both at the assistant gunner and secondary firer positions and in peripheral training exercises such as protective mask and night-fire small-arms training. The EST 2000 enhances moving...

To avoid injury keep face away from rear of receiver Hold rod assembly securely as it is under tension

Remove the Bolt and Operating Rod Assembly. Pull the cocking handle to the rear to start the rearward movement of the bolt and operating rod assembly inside of the receiver. With the index finger, reach inside the top of the receiver and push rearward on the face of the bolt until the bolt and operating rod assembly are exposed at the rear of the receiver. Grasp the bolt and operating rod and remove them from the rear of the receiver. Return the cocking handle to the forward position...

Trainer Assessment

The leaders are also involved in determining the proficiency of potential trainers by reviewing the following information. a. Selection. Trainers should be selected from the most highly qualified soldiers available within the unit. These soldiers should be knowledgeable of the machine guns, a high degree of proficiency in applying the fundamentals, and demonstrate a motivated attitude for marksmanship training. The leaders must ensure that a high level of proficiency is maintained....

Trainer Certification Program

The certification program standardizes procedures for certifying and sustaining the proficiency of trainers. Their technical expertise must be continuously refreshed and updated, and leaders must manage it closely. One of the goals of the program is for the trainer to know the training mission. a. Training Base. The training base can expect the same personnel changes as any other organization. Soldiers assigned as machine gun trainers have varying experience and knowledge of training procedures...

Training Strategy

Training strategy involves the overall concept for integrating resources into a program that trains individual and collective skills needed to perform a wartime mission. The goal of a marksmanship program is to produce well-trained gunners who can win and survive on the battlefield. a. Leaders implement training strategies for machine gun marksmanship in TRADOC institutions (IET, NCOES, IOBC, and IOAC) and in units. The overall training strategy is multifaceted and is inclusive of the specific...

Types Of Targets

Targets presented to the gunner in combat are usually enemy troops in various formations, which require distribution and concentration of fire. Targets with width and depth must be thoroughly covered by fire. a. Point Targets. Point targets require the use of a single aiming point. Examples of point targets are enemy soldiers, bunkers, weapons emplacements, and lightly armored vehicles. Fixed fire is delivered at point targets. b. Area Targets. Area targets may have considerable width and depth...

When raising or lowering the cover with the MWTS installed avoid slamming the MWTS into the heat shield or slamming the

Before zeroing and qualifying with the AN PAS-13, the gunner must mount the sight on the weapon (Figure G-26, page G-28). (a) Open the cover of the weapon. (b) Rotate the hook-retaining pin downward (over the top of the hinge pin) and remove the retaining clip from the left side of the hinge pin. (c) Remove the weapon's hinge pin. Do not lose the retaining clip.

A Machine Gun in the Offense

Successful offensive operations result from the employment of fire and maneuver. Each is essential and greatly depends upon the other. Without the support of covering fires, maneuvering in the presence of enemy fire can result in disastrous losses. Covering fires, especially those that provide fire superiority, allow maneuvering in the offense. However, fire superiority alone rarely wins battles. The primary objective of the offense is to advance, occupy, and hold the...

Figure Removal of the cover hanger and cartridge feed tray assemblies

The gunner pushes in the spring detent, raises d. Removing the Barrel Assembly. The gunner pushes in the spring detent, raises e. Removing the Trigger Mechanism Grip Assembly. The gunner pushes in and removes the flat leaf spring. He pushes out the front pin and slides the trigger mechanism grip assembly slightly forward, then pulls it out to remove it (Figure 2-13). f. Removing the Forearm Assembly. The gunner inserts a cleaning rod or the reamer portion of a...

Target Engagement During Limited Visibility

Gunners have problems detecting and identifying targets during limited visibility. The leader's ability to control the fires of his weapons is also reduced, therefore, he may instruct the gunners to fire without command when targets present themselves. a. Gunners should engage targets only when they can identify the targets, unless ordered to do otherwise. For example, if one gunner detects a target and engages it, the other gunner observes the area fired upon and adds his fire only if he can...

Do not get CLP in the gas cylinder when cleaning the barrel Turn the barrel upside down so that the gas cylinder is

The gas cylinder components are removed and cleaned only when inspection shows that the piston will not move within the cylinder when the barrel is tilted end-for-end. Unit maintenance personnel must supervise disassembly of the gas system. The receiver brush and swab-holding section of the cleaning rod may be used to clean the interior of the gas cylinder. When CLP is used, the gas cylinder and gas piston must be wiped dry before assembly. After assembly, the piston is checked for free...

Remedial Action

Remedial action is any action taken to determine the cause of a stoppage and to restore the weapon to an operational condition. This action is taken only after immediate action does not remedy the problem. a. Cold Weapon Procedures. When a stoppage occurs with a cold weapon, and if immediate action has failed, use the following procedures (1) While the weapon is on your shoulder, grasp the cocking handle with the right hand, palm up pull the cocking handle to the rear, locking the bolt. While...

Figure G Mounting the ANPVS

Mounting the AN PVS-4 on the M240B. Before zeroing and qualifying with the AN PVS-4, the gunner must mount the sight onto his weapon. The M240B machine gun has a rail mount already attached to the cover assembly (Figure G-59). The gunner installs the sight on the M240B rail mount by loosen the mounting knob located on the left side. Positioning it in a slot on the rail mount. Any slot may be used as long as the mount does not hang over the edge of the rail. By placing the bar of the mount in...

Range Procedures

The range can be a dangerous place, especially if safety procedures are not followed. Everyone must stay alert and adhere to the following precautions a. Before Firing. (1) Close all prescribed roadblocks and barriers, and post necessary guards. (2) Check all weapons to ensure that they are clear of ammunition and obstructions, and that the cover-feed mechanism assemblies are up to show they are cleared. (3) Brief all personnel on the firing limits of the range and firing lanes. (4) Obtain...

Be careful not to damage the internal ribs when installing the forearm assembly

Replacing Receiver Assembly and Forearm Assembly. To replace the forearm assembly, the gunner slides it onto the receiver. He presses in on the bottom of forearm assembly to latch. He shakes the forearm assembly up and down to ensure it is seated. b. Replacing the Trigger Mechanism Grip Assembly. To replace the trigger mechanism grip assembly, the gunner positions it on the bottom of the receiver, aligns it with the T-slot, and installs the front pin from the left side. He slides the slotted...

Machine Gun Te Manipulation Drills

The purpose of these exercises is to teach and instill confidence in the gunner in properly using his T& E. These exercises are conducted on a 25-meter line. a. Equipment Needed One Machine gun. One 4-foot X 8-foot sheet of plywood. Paint the plywood white with black ruled lines of 1 8-inch width horizontally and vertically. The horizontal lines are 2 inches apart, starting 1 inch from the top and the bottom. The vertical lines are 3 inches apart, with 1 inch on either side. (1) Label the...

Target Engagement

Target Reference Point Stake

The gunner engages targets throughout his sector. He must know how to effectively engage all types of targets either by himself or in conjunction with another gunner. a. Single Gunner. (1) Point Target. When engaging a point target, the gunner uses fixed fire (Figure 5-10). If the target moves after the initial burst, the gunner adjusts fire onto the target by following its movement. Figure 5-10. Engagement of point target. Figure 5-10. Engagement of point target. (2) Area Target. When engaging...

Vehicular Mount

The standard vehicular mount for the M60 machine gun is the M4 pedestal mount used on the HMMWV. One component of the pedestal mount, the M142 machine-gun mount, (which serves as a cradle for the weapon), is also adaptable to other vehicles (Figure 2-24). a. To mount the weapon, the gunner locks the platform in the horizontal position by inserting the travel-lock pin into the travel lock. He places the front mounting pin (in the forearm assembly) into the front mounting lug. He lowers the...

AEquipment Needed One Machine gun

One Basic machine gun target placed at a distance of 25 meters away with the reverse (blank) side showing. One Marking silhouette measures 1 inch X 1 2 inch X 22 inches long (wood). One F-type silhouette (reduced by half its size) measuring 7 1 2 inches long X 3 3 4 high (Chapter 4). b. Conduct. The instructor shows the target to the machine gun crews. He points out its parts and explains its use as follows (1) The gunner takes a normal position behind the machine gun. The gunner is required to...

Respect To The Ground

Fire with respect to the GROUND (Figure 5-3) includes grazing and plunging fires. a. Grazing Fire. Grazing fire occurs when the center of the cone of fire does not rise more than 1 meter above the ground. When firing on level or uniformly sloping terrain, the gunner can obtain a maximum of 600 meters of grazing fire. b. Plunging Fire. Plunging fire occurs when the danger space is confined to the beaten zone. Plunging fire also occurs when firing at long ranges, from high ground to low ground,...

Section V Fire Control

Fire control includes all actions of the leader and soldiers in planning, preparing, and applying fire on a target. The leader selects and designates targets. He also designates the midpoint and flanks or ends of a target, unless they are obvious to the gunner. The gunner fires at the instant desired. He then adjusts fire, regulates the rate of fire, shifts from one target to another, and ceases fire. When firing, the gunner should continue to fire until the target is neutralized or until...

M Tripod

The M122 tripod provides a stable mount for the M249, and it permits a higher degree of accuracy and control. The tripod is recommended for all marksmanship training and defensive employment. a. Mounting the M122 Tripod. The tripod assembly provides a stable and relatively lightweight base that is far superior to the bipod. The tripod may be extended and collapsed without difficulty. It consists of a tripod head, one front leg and two rear legs, and traversing bar. The traversing bar connects...

Maintenance During Nuclear Biological Chemical Conditions

If the M240B is contaminated by chemical, biological, or radiological agents, the gunner takes appropriate action to reduce exposure and minimize penetration. a. Chemical. The gunner uses towelettes from the M258A1 kit to wipe off the weapon. If these are not available, he washes the weapon with soap and water. b. Biological. The gunner uses towelettes or soap and water as previously described. c. Radiological. The gunner wipes the weapon with warm soapy water if it is available. If not, he...

Formation Bipod Or Tripod

The leader commands FORM FOR CREW DRILL. The crew forms in a file with five steps between each crew member in this order gunner, assistant gunner, and ammunition bearer. The gunner is five steps from and facing the leader. When the crew members reach their positions, each assumes the prone position and is ready for the crew drill. (Figure 4-18, page 4-26.) Figure 4-18. Crew in ready position. Figure 4-18. Crew in ready position.

Dangers

IF NOTHING IS EJECTED AND THE WEAPON IS HOT (200 OR MORE ROUNDS FIRED IN LESS THAN 2 MINUTES), DO NOT OPEN THE COVER. MOVE THE SAFETY TO S, WHICH PLACES THE WEAPON ON S. KEEP THE WEAPON POINTED DOWNRANGE AND KEEP AWAY FROM THE WEAPON FOR 15 MINUTES, THEN CLEAR THE WEAPON. 2. BE CAREFUL IN CLEARING THE WEAPON WHEN THE BARREL IS HOT, A ROUND MAY FIRE (COOK OFF) DUE TO THE BARREL'S HEAT INSTEAD OF DUE TO THE FIRING MECHANISM. DURING TRAINING OR ON A FIRING RANGE, AFTER THE WEAPON HAS FIRED 200...

General Assembly

After cleaning, lubricating, and inspecting the weapon, the gunner assembles the weapon and performs a function check. a. Replacing the Barrel Assembly. Insert the gas regulator plug into the gas hole bushing so that it is on the number one setting. (number 1 gas setting on the regulator faces towards the barrel). Place the gas collar over the front end of the gas regulator plug, while pushing against the spring, rotate counterclockwise until it stops. Insert one of the metal tabs of the heat...

Figure G meter reticle aiming point

(2) Fire three-single rounds loaded individually without making any sight adjustments. (3) The three-round shot group should be within a 4-cm circle to establish the center of the shot group in relation to the center base of the aiming paster. (4) Measure the amount of movement that is required left or right (windage) and either up or down (elevation) to move the three-round shot group onto the center of the aiming paster. (5) Upon completion, return to the firing line to make corrections to...

Operation

The MWTS has three modes of operation STANDBY, ON, and EMERGENCY. Figure G-24, page G-26, shows controls and indicators. (1) STANDBY Mode. When the system is first turned on, the MWTS begins a cool-down period of about 2 minutes. After the cool-down period, the MWTS enters the STANDBY mode. During the STANDBY mode, power is not applied to the scanner or display to extend the life of the battery. (2) ON Mode. When the MWTS is in the STANDBY mode and pressure is applied to the eyecup, the MWTS...

Inspection

Crew Served Maachine Guns

Inspection begins with the weapon disassembled in its major groups. Shiny surfaces do not mean the parts are unserviceable. The parts of the weapon and related equipment are inspected. Any broken or missing parts are repaired or replaced IAW TM 9-1005-201-10. The gunner performs preventive maintenance checks and services (PMCS) every 90 days. If the weapon has not been used in 90 days, PMCS is performed as stated in the operator's manual. If rust is seen on the weapon, perform PMCS immediately...

Table General data

rounds per minute. 6- to 9-round bursts. 4 to 5 seconds between bursts. Barrel changed every 10 minutes. rounds per minute. 10- to 13-round bursts. 2 to 3 seconds between bursts. Barrel changed every 2 minutes. rounds per minute. Fire continuous burst. Barrel changed every minute. for a three-man crew 600 to 900 rounds. Elevation, tripod controlled +200 mils Elevation, tripod free +445 mils Depression, tripod controlled -200 mils Depression, tripod free -445 mils Traverse, controlled by...

Cleaning Lubrication And Preventive Maintenance

The M60 machine gun should be cleaned immediately after firing. The gunner disassembles the M60 into its major groups for cleaning. All metal components and surfaces that have been exposed to powder fouling should be cleaned using CLP on a bore-cleaning patch. The CLP is used on the bristles of the receiver brush to clean the receiver. After the M60 is cleaned and wiped dry, a thin coat of CLP is rubbed on with a cloth. This lubricates and preserves the exposed metal parts during all normal...

Bipod Operations

The bipod assembly is used to fire from the prone position. The buttstock in conjunction with the gunners nonfiring hand provides support for the weapon when firing in the bipod mode. The gas cylinder holds the bipod in place. a. To lower the bipod legs, the gunner depresses the bipod retaining latch, while holding the bipod legs together to disengage from slots in the receiver. Then rotate the bipod legs down and release them so they lock in the vertical position. The bipod legs of the M240B...

Training Strategies

Training strategies are the same for all weapons that use the AN PAQ-4 except for the use of the illuminating beam. The illuminating beam allows soldiers to detect targets at ranges up to 2,000 meters (dependent upon terrain and weather constraints) in the highpower mode (tactical mode). Remember that the laser is not eye-safe in the tactical mode. In the low-power mode, targets can be engaged out to 600 meters during ideal limited visibility conditions (for example, 75 percent illumination, no...

Training For Combat Conditions

The trainer must realize that qualification is not an end but a step towards reaching combat requirements. To reach this goal, the gunner not only considers his position and the use of his weapon, but also some of the following combat conditions as well. a. Most engagements will be within 300 meters however, the gunner must still engage targets out to the maximum range of the machine gun. b. Enemy personnel are seldom visible except when assaulting. c. Most combat fire must be directed at an...

Respect To Target

Crew Served Maachine Guns

Fire with respect to the TARGET includes frontal, flanking, oblique, and enfilade fires. a. Frontal Fire.Frontal fire is when the long axis of the beaten zone is at a right angle to the front of the target. An example is when firing at the front of a target (Figure 5-4). b. Flanking Fire. Flanking fire is firing at the side of a target (Figure 5-4). Figure 5-4. Frontal fire and flanking fire. Figure 5-4. Frontal fire and flanking fire. c. Oblique Fire. Oblique fire is when the long axis of the...

Left Five Meters Drop One Hundred Meters

Fire commands need not be complete to be effective. In combat, the leader gives only the elements necessary to place fire on a target quickly and without confusion. During training, however, he should use all of the elements to get gunners in the habit of thinking and reacting properly when a target is to be engaged. After the gunner's initial training in fire commands, he should be taught to react to abbreviated fire commands, using one of the following methods....

Figure F Sighting target

The instructor takes a normal position behind the machine gun, keeping his body and hands clear of the gun so that the eye is in the correct position for aiming. (1) The gunner takes a position near enough to observe the instructor. (2) The assistant gunner stands near the instructor to transmit signals to the ammunition bearer. (3) The ammunition bearer is provided with the 3-inch sighting target and is posted as the marker at the blank target, which is 25 meters away from the gun....

Perform General Disassembly And Assembly

Cleared the machine gun using the procedures prescribed. 2. Disassembled the machine gun as prescribed for that machine gun. a. Removed the buttstock and buffer assembly. b. Removed the driving spring rod assembly. c. Removed the bolt and operating rod assembly. (Bolt is not separated from operating rod) d. Removed the trigger housing assembly. g. Removed the barrel assembly hand heat shield. h. Removed the handguard from the receiver. 3. Assembled the machine gun as prescribed for that machine...

Contents

Description and 1-1. 1-2. 1-3. 1-4. Blank Firing Section II. 1-5. Clearing 1-6. General 1-7. 1-8. Cleaning, Lubrication, and Preventive Maintenance 1-18 1-9. General 1-10. Function 1-11. Maintenance 1-12. Maintenance During Nuclear, Biological, Chemical Section III. Operation and 1-13. 1-14. 1-15. 1-16. Cycle of 1-17. 1-18. M122 1-19. Dismounting from the M122 1-20. Bipod 1-21. Vehicular 1-22. Tripod DISTRIBUTION RESTRICTION Approved for public release distribution is unlimited....

Mounting Procedures M Only

Refer to Figures G-42a and G-42b when mounting MWTS on M60 machine gun. a. Press on the end of the MWTS hinge pin latch (1) and remove the MWTS hinge pin latch and the MWTS hinge pin (2) from the M60 bracket (3). b. Install the MWTS hinge pin (2) and the MWTS hinge pin latch (1) on the M60 machine gun (4). c. Press on the right side end of the M60 hinge pin latch (5) with a pointed object and remove the M60 hinge pin latch. d. Release the feed tray cover latch (6) and fully raise the feed tray...

Warning

The M240B is carried loaded with the bolt locked to the rear in tactical situations where noise discipline is critical to the success of the mission. Trained gun crews are the only personnel authorized to load the M240B and only when command directs the crew to do so. During normal training exercises, the M240B is loaded and carried with the bolt in the forward position. e. Sight Setting and Sight Change Exercises. These exercises are designed to train the gunner in the operation and adjustment...

Mounting And Zeroing The Anpvs

Zeroing aligns the AN PVS-4 to the M249. The sight may be zeroed during daylight or darkness. (See TM 11-5855-213-10.) If done during daylight, the daylight cover must be used. To obtain a precise zero, it is best done at 300 meters and at night. Once an AN PVS-4 has been zeroed on an M249 machine gun, any soldier who knows how to use the reticle should fire the weapon effectively. However, there may be some changes in zero when the objective focus is adjusted to engage targets at various...