Firing Positions

The bipod-supported prone and fighting positions and the tripod-supported prone and fighting positions are covered in preliminary gunnery.

a. Prone Position, Bipod-Supported.

(1) Assume a prone position to the rear of the weapon (place the shoulder rest on your firing shoulder for the M249 and M60 only). An imaginary line drawn through the weapon should bisect the firing shoulder and buttock, and continue through the heel of your foot.

(2) Spread your legs a comfortable distance apart with your heels as close to the ground as possible, yet comfortable.

(3) Grasp the pistol grip with your firing hand. Place the fleshy end of the index finger resting lightly on the trigger. Place your nonfiring hand on the small of the stock with your thumb is curled underneath. Then slide your nonfiring hand forward until your little finger touches the receiver, so your aiming point will always be the same.

(4) Place your cheek against the forefinger of your nonfiring hand to form a stock weld. Try to position your nonfiring hand and cheek at the same spot on the stock each time you fire the weapon. The stock weld should provide for a natural line of sight through the center of the rear sight aperture to the front sight post and to the target. Relax your neck so that your cheek rests on your forefinger naturally.

(5) Apply a firm, steady pressure rearward and down, holding the weapon tightly into the hollow of your shoulder while aiming and firing.

(6) Keep your shoulders level and elbows about an equal distance from the receiver of the weapon (Figure 4-3).

NOTE: This is an example of the position and grip.Jf a soldier has problems obtaining proper sight picture with this grip, he should shift to a position that allows him a proper sight picture.

Helmet intentionally omitted to show hand positions

Imaginary line

NOTE: This is an example of the position and grip.Jf a soldier has problems obtaining proper sight picture with this grip, he should shift to a position that allows him a proper sight picture.

Helmet intentionally omitted to show hand positions

Imaginary line

Legs a comfortable distance apart heels down, if possible j

Legs a comfortable distance apart heels down, if possible

Prone Supported Firing Position
Figure 4-3. Prone position, bipod-supported.

NOTES: 1. The assistant gunner assumes a prone position along the left side of the gunner to load ammunition and observe.

2. Left-handed firing with the M249 and M60 is discouraged because the ejection pattern of some weapons is almost directly to the rear. When firing any machine gun using the tripod, the gunner must use his left hand to manipulate the T&E mechanism, therefore precluding the gunner from firing the machine gun left handed.

3. If a gunner has problems obtaining a proper sight picture, he should shift to a position that allows him to do so.

b. Fighting Position, Bipod-Supported. This is an excellent position that provides a stable firing platform. The depth of the fighting position and the support should be adjusted for the height and arm length of the gunner. This allows for a steadier position.

(1) Extend the bipod legs and place the machine gun in front of the position.

(2) Place your right (firing side foot) foot sideways against the rear of the fighting position and lean forward until your chest is squarely against the forward wall.

(3) Raise the folding shoulder rest and place it on your firing shoulder (M249 and M60 only). Keep your shoulders level or parallel to the ground.

(4) Grasp the pistol grip with your firing hand. place the fleshy end of the index finger resting lightly on the trigger. Place your nonfiring hand on the small of the stock and ensure that your thumb is curled underneath.

(5) Place your cheek against the forefinger of your nonfiring hand to form a stock weld. Try to position your nonfiring hand and cheek at the same spot on the stock each time you fire the weapon. The stock weld should provide for a natural line of sight through the center of the rear sight aperture to the front sight post and to the target. Relax your neck so that your cheek rests on your forefinger naturally.

(6) Apply a firm, steady pressure rearward and down, holding the weapon tight into the hollow of your shoulder while aiming and firing.

(7) Keep your shoulders level and elbows about an equal distance from the receiver of the weapon (Figure 4-4).

Crew Served Machine Guns
Figure 4-4. Fighting position, bipod-supported.

c. Prone Position, Tripod-Supported. The gunner assumes a prone position to the rear of the weapon (place the shoulder rest on your firing shoulder for the M249 and M60 only). An imaginary line drawn through the weapon should bisect the right shoulder and buttock and continue through the heel of his foot. When using the tripod, the assistant gunner assumes a prone position along the left side of the gunner to load ammunition and observe.

(1) The gunner, spreads his legs a comfortable distance apart with his heels as close to the ground as possible and still be comfortable.

(2) Grasps the pistol grip with his right hand with the fleshy end of his index finger resting lightly on the trigger. (The machine gun is not fired left-handed with the tripod because turning the traverse handwheel with the right hand is difficult.)

(3) Grasps the elevating handwheel with his left hand, palm down. Exerts a firm downward pressure with both hands while aiming and firing.

(4) Places both elbows on the ground between the tripod legs and his body. The position of his elbows raises or lowers his body in relation to the machine gun.

(5) Places his shoulder lightly against the stock without applying any pressure.

(6) Rests his cheek lightly (if at all) against the stock (Figure 4-5).

PRONE POSITION TRIPOD

PRONE POSITION TRIPOD

Prone Fighting Position
Figure 4-5. Prone position, tripod-supported.

d. Fighting Position, Tripod-Supported. (Figure 4-6.) The gunner places his right (firing side) foot sideways against the rear of the fighting position and leans forward until his chest is squarely against the wall.

(1) The gunner, grasps the pistol grip with his firing hand with the fleshy end of his index finger resting lightly on the trigger.

(2) Places his left hand on the elevating handwheel, palm down, exerting a firm downward pressure to make either minor or major adjustments in deflection or elevation. (The weapon is stabilized by the support of the tripod.)

(3) Places his elbows on the inside and does not touch the tripod.

(4) Places little or no pressure against the stock of the gun.

(5) Rests his cheek lightly, if at all, against the stock.

Crew Served Maachine Guns
Figure 4-6. Fighting position, tripod-supported.

Was this article helpful?

0 0
Knife Throwing Techniques of the Ninja

Knife Throwing Techniques of the Ninja

Knife Throwing Techniques of the Ninja. span stylecolor: 000000Do you want to learn the art of throwing knives? Ever wondered how it is done to perfection every time? Well here is your chance. This book contains well over 50 pages of detailed information and illustrations all about the art of knife throwing. This intriguing book focuses on the ninja's techniques and training. This is a must for all martial artists and anyone wanting to learn the knife throwing techniques of the ninja.span

Get My Free Ebook


Responses

  • asmara
    Which firing position places both arms in a downward position?
    1 year ago
  • weston
    What firing position places both arms in a downward position with the m249 saw?
    1 year ago
  • leevi
    How to fire the m249 saw in the prone position?
    5 months ago

Post a comment