What Can Cause Crushed Primers In A Super 1050

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The drawing of case #3 (above) is a depiction of a case that has been over crimped by adjusting the crimp die down (clockwise) too far. Note the defined line below the mouth of the case and the bulge below the line. This is not a proper crimp. This line is the direct result of the cartridge being over crimped. A line like this will only appear if the crimp die is adjusted down too far. Warning: Over crimping .45ACP, .38 Super, 9mm, etc., can actually cause the bullet to be loose in the case.

Adjustments for calibers 9mm, .38 Sp.,

.45 ACP and for hot loads that have been fired many times Configuration 1

To begin, place a military case (sized, decapped and unswaged) into Station 3.

Screw the back-up rod (#12749*) down two turns into the toolhead (#20420). Pull the handle.

Using a wrench turn the back-up rod (#12749*) down until it hits the inside bottom of the case. Note: Do not force the expander as this will damage the case and the shellplate. Now secure the lock ring (#20006*). Raise the handle.

Screw the eyebolt (#13245) all the way into the swager. Grease the clevis pin (#13522) heavily.

Put the swager into position. Push the clevis pin through the connecting rod and eyebolt and secure with the hitch pin (#13840). Replace the swage cover (#13064).

With the military case still in Station 3, pull the operating handle down with your left hand. Now turn the swager upward with your right hand until it meets resistance. With your left hand raise the operating handle about 10 inches. With your right hand turn the swager up a 1/4 turn. Cycle the handle down.

Fig. 58 - Note the difference between the swaged primer pocket (left) and the unswaged primer pocket (right).

Raise the handle just enough to remove the case and inspect the primer pocket to see the amount of swaging being done. The swager should leave a radiused entrance on the primer pocket. Fig. 58

Turn the swager in, using 1/4 turn increments until you achieve the proper swage. Secure the jam nut (#13682). Note: Do not over swage. This condition will cause damage to the shellplate (#12600*).

When your swager is properly adjusted you will feel resistance during the final 1/2" to 1" of the downward stroke of the handle.

Adjustments for rifle calibers Configuration 2

To begin, place a military case (sized, decapped and unswaged) into Station 3.

Remove the back-up rod (#12749*) from the back-up die (#12184).

With the operating handle in the down position, screw the back-up die into Station 3 until the die comes into contact with the shellplate. Now back the die out one full turn and secure it in place with the lock ring (#14067).

Leave the handle in the down position. With a wrench, screw the backup rod into the back-up die. Turn the back-up rod down until it touches the inside bottom of the case. Note: Do not force the expander as this will damage the case and the shellplate. Now secure the lock ring (#20006*). Raise the handle.

Screw the eyebolt (#13245) all the way into the swager. Grease the clevis pin (#13522) heavily.

Put the swager into position. Push the clevis pin through the connecting rod and eyebolt and secure with the hitch pin (#13840). Replace the swage cover (#13064).

With the military case still in Station 3, pull the operating handle down with your left hand. Now turn the swager upward with your right hand until it meets resistance.With your left hand raise the operating handle about 10 inches. With your right hand turn the swager up a 1/4 turn. Cycle the handle down.

Raise the handle just enough to remove the case and inspect the primer pocket to see the amount of swaging being done. The swager should leave a radiused entrance on the primer pocket. Fig. 58

Turn the swager in, using 1/4 turn increments until you achieve the proper swage. Secure the jam nut (#13682). Note: Do not over swage. This condi tion will cause damage to the shellplate (#12600*).

When your swager is properly adjusted you will feel resistance during the final 1/2" to 1" of the downward stroke of the handle.

RL1050 vs. Super 1050

Not all parts are the same but some are still interchangeable. We have made changes to several parts used on the Super 1050 that are not interchangeable with the RL1050 machine.

• The Super 1050 primer lever assembly (#) has a longer arm to accommodate the higher toolhead travel. This is not available for RL 1050 machines. Primer feed body (#20773) will fit both machines but again the primer lever assembly will not.

• The Super 1050 assembly does not include the ratchet cam, ratchet restriction tab and related parts.

• The Super 1050 index lever has been shortened considerably and will not index properly on RL 1050 machines.

• The Super 1050 index roller has changed in diameter and is much too large for the RL 1050.

• The Super 1050 mainshaft, mainshaft pivot pin, crankshaft assembly, and bearings are completely different.

• The casefeed body has been modified to allow long cases to feed through but is interchangeable between the Super 1050 and RL 1050 machines.

• Any RL 1050 toolhead assembly will fit the Super 1050 machine. You will need to remove the ratchet cam from the toolhead and install a 1/8" thick washer or spacer in its place. Then reinstall the cam guide bolt.

• The toolhead spring and sleeve, as a set, are longer to accommodate the increased toolhead travel on the Super 1050 but they will work on the RL 1050.

• Any RL 1050 shellplate will fit on the Super 1050 with one exception. The #1 shellplate for .45 ACP has tight fitting pockets and may or may not allow .308 Winchester cases to feed into the shellplate freely. All new #1 shellplates have a star next to the number one to indicate the revised version.

• The Super 1050 indexer return spring has an additional bend in it but can be used on both the Super 1050 and RL 1050 machines. NOTE: If you are using an indexer return spring from an RL 1050 spare parts kit, you will need to make an additional bend in the spring before installing it on the Super 1050. • The RL 1050 spent primer cup has been replaced with a larger, plastic spent primer cup and bracket. It is not interchangeable.

Using RL 1050 toolheads and dies on the Super 1050...

If you want to interchange an RL 1050 toolhead already set for a caliber you want to load onto the Super 1050 you will need to check for the following clearances.

1. Remove the toolhead assembly from the Super 1050.

2. Replace the shellplate with the shellplate for the caliber you intend to load with.

3. Remove the toolhead spring and set the toolhead onto the mainshaft while holding the handle at about mid-travel for proper alignment into the frame. Next, install the washer and toolhead bolt.

4. Slowly lower the handle and look to see if any die comes in contact with the shellplate. Readjust dies as needed.

5. Place one unprimed case in the swage station and again slowly lower the handle. Readjust the expander and swage rod as needed.

6. Once you have reset the dies to the machine, remove the toolhead and reinstall the toolhead spring and complete the rest of the conversion and set up to reload. Reinstall the toolhead.

Trouble Shooting

.308 Winchester and related calibers with similar case length (.243 and/or .22-250) also lend themselves to reloading on this new machine. No special changes are necessary to the die set. Hard or Incomplete Indexing

1.) Wrong size locator buttons (#20637*).

3.) Shellplate lock ring adjusted too tightly (#20311).

4.) Dirt under the shellplate (#12600*).

5.) Bent or broken shellplate (#12600*).

5.) Bent or broken shellplate (#12600*).

When reinstalling the ejector tab (#13189) it is vital that it is not set too low or it will interfere with the shellplate.

6.) Ejector tab (#13189) interfering with the shellplate - see above photo.

Station 1: Case Insertion Problems

1.) Wrong size case insert plunger (#13073*).

2.) Wrong case insert adapter (#13654*).

3.) Shellplate lock ring not adjusted tight enough.

4.) Dirt in the shellplate (#12600*) pockets or damaged shellplate.

5.) Handle being moved too rapidly on upstroke.

6.) Bent or broken roller bolt (#13333).

7.) Dirt or media in casefeed track.

Station 2: Resizing and Decapping Problems

With .30-06 and .270 calibers it is important to note that the seater and crimp dies must be shortened for clearance reasons. They are available and are included with the respective conversion kits.

1.) Crushed cases:

a.) Shellplate lock ring too loose or too tight.

b.) Not enough radius on the die. Use Dillon dies whenever possible.

c.) Wrong size or missing locator buttons.

2.) Bending or breaking decapping pins:

b.) Slightly bent decapping assembly or pin.

c.) Berdan primed cases.

d.) Dirt in shellplate pockets.

e.) Handle being moved too rapidly on the down stroke.

f.) Rocks or other foreign objects in cases.

Station 3: Primer Pocket Swaging Problems

1.) Primers smearing or crushing:

a.) Swage back-up rod not down far enough (#13332 or #13348).

b.) Swage rod not adjusted high enough (#20314 - large or #20313 -small).

Station 4: Priming Problems

When reinstalling the ejector tab (#13189) it is vital that it is not set too low or it will interfere with the shellplate.

Dillon Adjusting Primer Punch Assembly

The above photo shows the rocker arm set screw (#13226) being adjusted. The Super 1050 comes from the factory with this set screw properly adjusted, but over time it can move. When the rocker arm set screw is out of adjustment, it can dent primers and/or cause the primer slide to stick. When properly adjusted, the primer punch (#12849 large - #13307 small) will be flush with the platform surface - see arrow above. 1.) Crushed primers:

a.) Swage rod (#20314 - large or #20313 - small) not adjusted correctly, dirty or worn out.

c.) Ringed primer. When a spent primer has been pierced by the decap-ping pin leaving a ring of metal from the primer in the pocket.

d.) Primer station locator button (#20637*) not adjusted correctly.

f.) The bench that the machine is mounted on is not rigid enough. This can be corrected by affixing a board to both the wall and your bench.

g.) Hot-loaded ammo that has been fired several times and the base of the case has been flattened out.

2.) High primers:

a.) Adjust the primer push rod (#12819).

b.) On .223 cases the swage back-up rod (#13332) is down too far, slightly collapsing the primer pocket and not allowing the primer to seat fully.

d.) Erratic handle motion.

e.) Do not remove the rubber piece on the primer slide.

3.) Smeared primers - see Station 3: Primer Pocket Swaging - item 1

a.) When adjusting the priming station locator tab, it should be set as close to the case as possible without touching it. Be sure the cases in the shellplate rotate freely past the tab. Change primer magazine tips every 20,000 rounds. Note: Move the handle down, bringing the toolhead down. Move the locator tab in to the case in the priming station.

Station 5. Powder and Case Mouth Belling Problems

1.) Crushing cases:

a.) Wrong size or missing locator buttons.

2.) Spilling powder:

a.) Slamming or going too fast with the operating handle (#12727).

b.) Stick or pencil-lead type powders bridging on the case mouth in the powder funnel (#13005). See conversion chart.

c.) Check powder bar adjustment.

3.) Erratic belling:

a.) Variation in case length. Divide cases by brand.

b.) Handle not moving all the way down on each stroke. Note: Try setting a bullet on the case mouth in Station 6.

4.) Erratic powder charges:

a.) Powder bar not moving full length of its travel. Turn the powder die down until it does.

Station 7: Bullet Seating Problems 1.) Erratic seating depth of the bullet:

a.) Build up of lead shaving and/or lube in the seater or crimp dies.

b.) Bullets having erratic dimension

(length and/or the ogive).

c.) Use the proper seating stem for the type of bullet being used.

d.) Variations in case types and/or lots - sort brass.

e.) Refer to a loading manual for proper loaded length (OAL) and additional information.

Station 8: Crimping Problems

1.) Erratic crimping:

a.) Length of cartridge cases erratic, probably due to mixed brands of brass.

b.) Worn out or improperly made die, use Dillon dies whenever possible.

2.) Loose bullet:

a.) Too much taper crimp. Note, this condition also ruins accuracy.

Maintenance

Loctite

Loctite should be used following adjustments to or replacement of all threaded screws. Please note that Loctite should be applied to threaded portions only and should be of a nonpermanent type. Blue Loctite #242 is recommended.

Swage

Clean the swage by pulling the operating handle down and use a small brush to clean the tip. Every 10,000 rounds, remove the swage rod (#20314 - large or #20313 - small). and clean, lightly grease and replace. Note: Do not grease the tip of the swage where it contacts the primer pocket.

Lubrication

Operating circumstances will dictate the frequency of required lubrication. It is highly recommended that the Super 1050 be cleaned and lubed after every 10,000 rounds of operation.

Use a high-grade, conventional wheel bearing grease - do not use oil.

Lubrication Points:

Casefeed Plunger (#13073*), lube the sides and bottom. Casefeed Plunger Roller (#13498) and Bolt (#13333)

Tappet(#12995)

Rocker Arm (#13058), cam surfaces and hole.

Pivot Bolt (#13296)

Primer Punch Base (#12849 - large or

Return Rod Bolt Super 1050
Swage Connecting Rod (#13417) and Clevis Pin (#13522)

Lube the Indexing Lever Cam surface (#20312) and Index Lever Shoulder Bolt (#13276). With the handle in the rest position, you will see the Index Roller (#10996) come into contact with the Lever Cam surface. The Index Roller (#10996) also requires periodic lubrication.

Casefeed Plunger (#13073*), lube the sides and bottom. Casefeed Plunger Roller (#13498) and Bolt (#13333)

^alignment pin s casefeed cam

Super 1050 mainshaft 10999

Shellplate lock ring (#20311), bottom surface to shellplate face.

^alignment pin s casefeed cam

Super 1050 mainshaft 10999

Shellplate lock ring (#20311), bottom surface to shellplate face.

Alignment Pins (#12972 & #13515 located under the toolhead) Cam Guide Bolt (#12486) and its mated slot

Toolhead Bore (#20420 - lightly to avoid rusting and/or freezing up) Mainshaft Lubrication - Use only 30 weight motor oil. DO NOT use a penetrating lubricant such as WD-40, Breakfree, etc...

• Shellplate center hole. It's easiest to lubricate the shellplate center hole when changing from one caliber to another.

We recommend that you use a droplet of Blue Loctite on the threads of the following bolts prior to reinstalling: #13333, #13296, and #13276 (see photos and schematics).

Lube Points for the Super 1050 Crank Assembly

With the handle in the rest position, on the left side of the machine, use a grease syringe to lube the bearing pin (#11009) located in the link arm (#11002). Then, cycle the handle down to the bottom stop.

Again, using the grease syringe, lube the mainshaft pivot pin (#10994) on the left side of the machine via the access hole located 1.2" above the carrier cap (#11010).

Use 30 weight motor oil on the mainshaft (#10999).

Towards the back of the machine, lube the indexing lever cam surface (#20312) and index lever shoulder bolt (#13276).

When it is time to lube the roller bearings (#11008) in the frame and crankshaft, first remove the swage rod assembly, swage connecting rod, and operating handle. On the left side of the machine, use a 5/32" Allen wrench to remove the screw (#13685). Slide the carrier cap (#11010) out of its bore and lube the left-hand side roller bearing (#11008) and carrier cap. Next, slide the crankshaft (#11000) out of the frame from the right side of the machine BUT NO MORE THAN 3/4". Using a grease syringe, dispense some grease onto the right-hand side roller bearing (#11008). Next, lube the crankshaft surface (#11000). Then, reinsert the crankshaft fully into the frame. Reinstall the carrier cap (#11010). Blue Loctite must be used on the threads before installation, tighten. Finally, reassemble the swage component and operating handle back onto the frame. Lube the swage connecting rod (#13417) and clevis pin (#13522).

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  • BENJAMIN
    What can cause crushed primers in a super 1050?
    4 years ago
  • lea
    What causes crushed primers while reloading 45 acp?
    3 years ago

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