Reeving Triple Block

-jplgvre 56.

—Blocks and tackle.

Field Expedient Weapons

SINGLE BLOCK (MECHANICAL ADVANTAGE:!)

TWO SINGLE BLOCKS ( MECHANICAL ADVAMT AGE : 2 >

TWO SINGLE BLOCKS ( MECHANICAL ADVAMT AGE : 2 >

Figure 57.—Simple tackles. Examples of block and tacWc rigging, showing mechanical advantage. Each p represents a iope wh en supports an equal part of the weigh* acting on tlie whole tackle.

ONE SINGLE, ONE DOUBLE BLOCK (MECHANICAL

Figure 57.—Simple tackles. Examples of block and tacWc rigging, showing mechanical advantage. Each p represents a iope wh en supports an equal part of the weigh* acting on tlie whole tackle.

ONE SINGLE, ONE DOUBLE BLOCK (MECHANICAL

concealment.

(4) Obstacles.

(5) Covered approaches.

b. All grades of soldiers must learn automatic choice of position with the above factors in mind. 3ome entrenchments offer better protection than others. Dig the one you have time for and improve it every chance you get. The important tiling is to start digging as soon as you can.

■ 33. Entrenching Tools.—Infantry troops carry in their packs small individual digging tools with which they dig entrenchments. Engineers carry no such tools, but in engineer transportation and pioneer tool sets there are standard -sire picks, shovels, and axes. When these are unavailable you must use whatever is at hand, such as meat-can cover, canteen cup, bayonet, sticks, or anything else with which you can dig a hole.

■ 34. Prone Shelter (flg. 59).—When you are halted for more than a few minutes and are out of contact with the enemy, the prone shelter should be built It is comparatively easy to constrict and it protects you from^jKD^b fragments. You can lie down in it and rest. But it does not protect you against the crushing action of tanks.

■ 35. Shell-Holb Positions (flg. 60).—In a shell-pitted area, improved shell holes oiler quick protection and some concealment with only a small amount of labor.

■ 36. Pox Holes (figs. 61 and 62).—Pox holes afford maximum cover from any kind of fire, and also give protection from tanks.

■ 37. Weapon Emplacements.—Engineers not only build their own entrenchments and emplacements, but they also may be ca21ed upon to build such positions for other troops. Therefore you should be familiar with the design of emplacements for infantry weapons as well as your own weapons. Figures 63 to 66. inclusive, show machine-gun emplacements. Figure 67 is an emplacement for the 37-mm antitank gun. In order to illustrate clearly the design of these emplacements, concealment and camouflage have been purposely omitted. Remember that alternate positions are habitually dug for each weapon, as a weapon that is fired from one place cannot survive for long.

■ 38. Revetment.—The v^alls of entrenchments sometimes need support. The process of bolstering these walls is called reveting. Revetments may be made with sandbags (flg. 42 > or with picces of wood (flg. 68).

■ 39. Barbed Wire.—a. Barbed wire is a difficult obstacle for men, animals, and wheeled vehicles. It is often necessary for engineers to construct barbed-wire fences. Figure 69 is a diagram of a double-apron fence. The layout of such a fence Is complicated and Is not taken up here. However, there are numerous little Jobs in the construction of a barbed-wire double-apron fence which may cause trouble if they are not accomplished correctly. These are mostly tricks of fastening wire to posts. Figure 70 ehowc a acrcw-type picket. Practice making the connections shown on figures 71 and 72. Figure 73 B&ovra how to roll a barbed-wire bobbin.

68 30 b. Clearing barbed wire is sometimes an engineer's Job.

Figure 74 shows how to cut barbed wire so as to make as little noise as possible. When speed is more important than silence, barbed wire is blown hy mpan* of a bangalore torpedo. <8ce par. 48.)

Bangalore M1a2 Field Expedient Pickets

Figvius 59.—Prone shelter.

Figvius 59.—Prone shelter.

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