Saw

b. Carrying long or heavy loads.—(1) For long, fairly light objects, such as timber beams or ponton balk, one man takes each end; to keep it from tipping over, the load rests on the right shoulder of the man in front and on the left shoulder of the man in the rear. (See flg. 39.)

(2 > For carrying somewhat heavier objects, more men may be used in a similar manner, but it is better to use pick handles, pipes or bars of ample length placed underneath. Two men (on opposite sides of the load) carry each handle. Timber and rail tongs. If available, should be used in the same manner, except that the load hangs below the handles. Figure 40 illustrates the use of the pcavy to carry timber. Extremely heavy loads should be handled on pipe rollers, wheeled dollies, block and tackle, or by machines.

fishplate butt joint fishplate butt joint

F:g. 37—Simple timber splices.

Figure 4H.—Using the pcavy to cf.rry heavy timber.

■ 16. UsrNo Saxtdbags <see fig. 42).—Sandbags are always laid with the chokes (mouths) tucked under and the side seams fluid tied ends Inside. Grain, cement, and similar

26 15-16

(3) For small but heavy loads, a wheelbarrow should be used with the load placed evenly as far forward as practicable.

c. Carrying chcss.—A wide one-man load, such as plank or 10-ton ponton chess, is carried on edge, rear end down, next to the body, with the right hand underneath, near the middle or balance, and the left hand on top steadying and guiding the load. (See fig. 41®.) Sometimes, when the chess is unusually muddy and slippery, or when fatigue necessitates the use of two supporting hands, the chess may be carried with both hands underneath. (See fig. 410.) When this is done, however, special care must be taken to control the plank so that no one is hit by the ends. For carrying 25-ton ponton chess, two men are needed.

Figure 4H.—Using the pcavy to cf.rry heavy timber.

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bags can be used, but they should not be more than half-filled or they will be too heavy for a man to handle. Sandbags are used frequently as reveting material to bolster the sides of holes in the ground. Figure 42 shows various ways to use sandbags for revetments. To lay sandbags properly, they must be shaped so that when in place they are roughly half as wide as they are long.

F:g. 37—Simple timber splices.

Piouhe 41.—Carrying 10-ton ponton chess.

SEAMS OUT (WRONG)

Piouhe 41.—Carrying 10-ton ponton chess.

SEAMS OUT (WRONG)

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