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make, regardless of how much experience at it one has. So I suggest using the following method, which is the simplest, most efficient one I know. Place the part to be stoned between two hardened flat pieces of steel (such as lathe cutting tools) in a vise. Allow the surface to be stoned to extend just above and parallel to the hardened pieces of metal. These pieces actually serve as guides. Rest the stone against the guides, and carefully begin stoning the part's surface flush with the guides. Continue until satisfactory shape and smoothness are attained.

The trigger bar and disconnector are made in one piece from sheet steel at least .0625 inch (1/16 inch) thick and not thicker than .100 inch. Drill a 1/8 inch hole in the piece's forward end. Lay its shape out from this hole, using the template on page 72. The hook at the rear of this bar engages the sear extension, pulling the sear out of engagement with the hammer when the trigger is pulled. The forward edge of the hook is square and as smooth as possible, with five degrees or less of forward rake. Sloping the back of the hook to the rear allows it to cam over the sear extension when the trigger is released.

Braze or silver-solder a .375 inch long pin made from 1/8 inch drill rod into the holeinthe front end of thetrigger bar. One end of the pin is flush with the outer trigger bar's edge, the body of the pin extending with its otherend then through the frame, engaging in the hole in the upper end of the trigger.

Axis pins for the trigger and sear are made from 1/8 inch drill rod. Use 3/16 inch drill rod for the hammer's axis pin. Drill stems from broken or worn drills of the proper size are suitable for such pins. They are cut to the same length as the pistol's frame width, and their ends crowned or rounded slightly. The grips will hold the hammer and sear pins in place in the frame, but such is not the case with the trigger pin. Since it has no retainers, at least one of the holes for this pin must provide a tight fit. If the frame holes are drilled with a No. 31 drill, the 1/8 inch pin should fit tightly enough.

At this time, fabricate the hammer strut to the dimensions given in the diagram.

Make the takedown lever from 3/8 inch drill rod. Automobile valve stem is also suitable for this part. Cut the rod extra-long, since it will be forged at one end; if too short, the rod's other end will not be cool enough to handle.

To shape the takedown lever, a forging block is needed. One may be built by obtaining a piece of heavy, flat steel, thicker than the pistol's width. Drill a hole in this stock just big enough for the heated takedown rod to fit snugly into, and just deeper than the pistol's width. Heat the rod to forging temperature, and fit it into the forging block as far as it will go. Then, using a heavy hammer, forge and flatten the rod to a right angle.

Do not attempt forging the steel after it has cooled to a

Close-up view of the take-down lever. It can be made from an automobile valve stem, 3/8 inch drill rod, or similar material.

Right; the magazine latch/mainspring guide, mainspring, and hammer strut. The spring actually serves as both a hammer spring and magazine latch spring.

Trigger bar-disconnector, with Its tension pin and spring removed. It Is made from sheet steel at least 1/16 Inch thick.

dark red color; the steel may develop cracks or seams if so treated. To avoid this problem, just repeat the heating operation.

Complete the forging process by flattening the rod just over the hole in the forging block, forming a flange or lip as shown in the diagrams. This flange will hold the takedown lever in place, flush with the pistol frame. Once this step is satisfactorily finished, the piece is allowed to cool, then cut and filed to final shape.

Be sure to leave a thicker portion at the outer end of the actual lever, and shape it as shown. Checker or groove this lever with a checkering tool.

When the takedown lever is completed, insert it into its hole in the pistol frame. Mark a site on the lever for a retainer pin, just inside the left side of the frame. Bore this hole with a 1/16 inch drill, and make a tight-fitting pin for it, just long enough to keep the takedown lever in place.

As shown, the forward side of the takedown lever's shaft is cut down to just over half diameter. Use a small square file for this. When the finished takedown lever is turned to the rear, the receiver assembly may be slid forward, lifted upward, and removed.

The safety is fabricated from the same size drill rod as the takedown lever, and uses the same forging procedure. A projection is forged into the front of the safety shaft. This projection blocks the sear when the safety is pushed upward into the engaged or safe position. Drill a 1/8 inch hole part way through the front of the projection to receive a small coil spring and detent pin, which serves to retain the safety in the frame, and keep it snug in both on and off positions.

Note that the safety pivots on a pin silver-soldered into a hole drilled at the rear end of the safety shaft.

Leave a ledge on the outside front of the safety lever when finishing it with a file, since the safety should be easily grasped and manipulated. Checker or groove this part of the lever to complete it.

Construct the magazine catch to the dimensions shown from either folded sheet metal or steel stock. If sheet steel is chosen for this part, weld or silver-solder on its lower end; this projection actually engages the bottom rear edge of the clip, and therefore must be strong. Be certain to allow sufficient clearance within the magazine catch for the hammer strut to work freely inside it. The catch's 1/8 inch pivot pin should be a press fit, or silver-soldered in place. Groove or checker the lower exposed end of the magazine catch to finish it.

Cut the ejector to shape from sheet steel using the pattern shown. The hole in its forward end fits around the trigger pivot pin, while its body rests against the frame body on the inside left frame upright.

Both a left and right hand grip are made from whatever material you deem suitable. Grips for the pistol shown were made from American Walnut. Note that sufficient

.800"

TAKEDOWN LEVER

Handflt to block sear In upward position / 1/8"

SAFETY

Left the ejector, which actually ejects empty cartridges by deflecting them through the ejector port. It remains stationary In the completed pistol.

Above: left-side enlargement of the hook at the extreme rear of the trigger bar. This hook will engage the sear leg, pulling the sear out of engagement with the hammer when the trigger Is pulled.

Left the ejector, which actually ejects empty cartridges by deflecting them through the ejector port. It remains stationary In the completed pistol.

Above: left-side enlargement of the hook at the extreme rear of the trigger bar. This hook will engage the sear leg, pulling the sear out of engagement with the hammer when the trigger Is pulled.

Configuration of the hammer, sear, disconnector, ejector, and trigger within the pistol frame. Some hand-fitting of these parts may be necessary during assembling and testing of the completed weapon.

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