Standard Rifling Cutter

WELD

WELD

WELD

Expedient Homemade Ammo

1.250"

D CD

E ra

LOWER RECEIVER

Rifling Cutter

When positioned correctly, magazine in ci snug fil

The (runt lace of the cylindrical portion should he shaped to the same contour as the radiused lower rear end of the lower receiver. If this receiver is intended only for use with shop-made upper receivers, the exact contour is not important. The only requirement is that both parts mate closely. If. however, it i* ever intended to lie used with a commercial upper assembly, it is important that the 5/8-inch radius used on the commercial part he preserved. This can he formed rather siniplv using a I 1/4-inch end mill. Such end mills, with a 3/4-inch-diameter shank to allow use in the more or less standard R8 collets, arc expensive and many limes hard to find, so other methods may be required to form it. If a rotary table is available it is a fairly simple matter to form the curve required. Otherwise, a fairly satisfactory job can be done by roughing it

Homemade Radius CutterHomemade Rifling Cutter

to shape using the largest milling cutter available and finishing it with a hand grinder and/or hall round files. A hole for the tenon that keeps the stock from turning should be drilled a* shown in rhe drawing before this part is welded in place. It is hard to locate and drill after installation.

To assure a close fit and proper alignment, a mandrel some 7 inches long is turned to just Lit inside the upper receiver for at least 5

, . * . . i JVfandnd ls used tr> aften part* for wdumv turned to a close fit inside the threaded cylindrical part of the lower. Both ends are drilled and tapped to accept 1/4 x 28 draw bolts to a depth of at least 1 inch.

Large washers, big enough to fit over each end of the receiver openings, are required for each draw bolt.

The mandrel is installed inside the upper receiver, and the draw bolt with washer in place is screwed into the front end. The filler block is then pushed in place over the smaller end of the mandrel and the other draw holt/washer installed Mandrel is inc4»rtarl in upper receiver with bracket in place on smaller end. and drawn up tight, pulling the two parts together as closely as possible. l"hc lower sides. The parts should be allowed to cool assembly is put in place on the lower receiver and before the clamp, hinge pin, and mandrel are the sheet metiil trimmed to expose enough of the removed to minimi/e any chances of warpage. filler block to assure an ample weld seam. If desired, the trigger guard can be hinged as

When this is accomplished, the front hinge on the original, but an equally satisfactory guard pin is installed and both parts are clamped can be made by slotting the front and rear of the together at the rear. The filler block is now welded guard uprights and silver-soldering a sheet metal in place along both sides under the round portion strap in place, and completely around the hack and along the

TOP VIEW, SHORT MAGAZINE

.900"

TOP VICW. FULL-IFNGTH MAGAZINE

M203 Upper View

BOTTOM VIEW

BOTTOM VIEW

LOWER RECEIVER

Homemade Welding Tables
Clumped in place ready far welding to iowci receiver

Al this point all weld joints should he dressed smooth and the entire assembly should be polished, smooth, and free of tool marks. Next the assembly is secured in the milling machine vise, making certain that it is flat and level and square with the table. Now. using the dimensions given in the drawing, the various holes arc located anil drilled. This can be done with complete accuracy through use of the graduated dials on both the longitudinal and cross feeds. Using tin-front edge of the magazine well and the top of the receiver as starting points, the work is moved to the correct loc ution for the hammer pin hole and the hole is drilled. As usual, it should be started with a renter drill, followed by an undersized drill and then the full-size drill. Holes drilled using this method arc not us likely to deflect or crawl, as is common when only the full-size drill is used. The work is then moved to ihe correct location for the next hole and drilled using the same method. This is repeated until all are drilled. A slot is cut in the location shown lor the trigger and h hole for the grip bolt drilled and tapped.

Home Made M16 Lower Parts

Wefding completed and rough-finished.

One Way Rifeling Cutter

Rrwr (rigger guard and f>np mount.

Rifling Cutter

Kofiom view of rear fngger guard

Rrwr (rigger guard and f>np mount.

One Way Rifeling Cutter

fkar jjjncrd welded in piacc.

Kofiom view of rear fngger guard

While ihe operations described may seem time-consuming and complicated, it isn't actually as difficult as il may seem. Such a receiver will require a full day s work to build from siart to finish, but if one wants one had enough and this is the only way to get it, it will be worthwhile.

Again, be advised that this part may be dlegal to manufacture. Think carefully and weigh the consequences before you build one. Mine was made before the so-called "assault weapons" ban went into effect and is therefore considered legal. But since the law is now in effect. I wouldn't be interested in building another. rlhe requirement that home-manufactured firearms be marked with the makers name, address, and a serial number should also be kept in mind.

fkar jjjncrd welded in piacc.

.325"

3.355"

2.00"

6.375"

.525"

2.00"

Home Made M16 Lower Parts

2.050"

LOWER RECEIVER HOLE LOCATIONS f

M16 Lower Receiver Dimensions

LOWER RECEIVER WITH FULL-LENGTH MAGAZINE

Bevfitchett Diy Upper Receiver
Completed lower receiver with pistol vnrsion upper pinned in place.
Home Made M16 Lower Parts
Löwer receiver with open Jjoll pltiy partially inserted
Home Made M16 Lower Parts
Same, with breech plug in plu< v
Home Made M16 Lower PartsHome Made M16 Lower PartsPistol Vise Homemade

I Wu of offset, formed as shown.

Vfalc and/muife die$ used io form offal in le/i receiver vy^jll of full icngth magadne opening.

(I nmp'ngpressure am bv exerted i^sir^ »lusdv vise with e.uer.-iftwi:ki vise handle. Dnn'r try this with a chimp import vkn.

Offset partwDy formed, further damping pressure wu! finish.

I Wu of offset, formed as shown.

MAGAZINES

Tor years many of us used Stcn magazines in our experimental assauli-lype firearms, mainly because they were plentiful and cheap. Apparently they are still plentiful, although the price has gone up.

While the existing magazines should probably be used as long as they arc available, mainly to save labor, an alternate sourcc of supply should be kept in mind. This means making them yourself. Although I have detailed a method for making them in other books, a different method, which is somewhat easier hut equally satisfactory when properly done, is described herein.

It should be pointed out that this unit was urigitudly designed as a 9mm conversion only, to mate with existing AR-15 or VI16 lower receiver assemblies. The Stcn magazine is the correct width to just fit inside the original magazine well, and, when used in combination with the magazine adapter described in the small parts chapter, allows a close, snug fit. If the unit is buili in one of the 10mm calibers or .45 ACP, the same outside dimensions must be adhered to since wider magazines, such as the Thompson, grease gun, and the like, will not go in the hole.

The same Sten magazines as used in the 9mm can be used with the larger calibers if the inside is simply swaged slightly longer In permit feeding of the longer cartridges. I'he maximum overall length of the .45 ACP cartridge is stated to be

1.275 inchesv and that of the lOmms is somewhat less, depending on which one is used. All that is required is to swage the concave scam at the rear of the magazine body slightly Hat, thereby lengthening the inside c>( the body without increasing the outside length.

I'hc swage used to accomplish this is made from a flat bar of steel 1.300 inches wide, .312 inch thick, and 1 1 Inches long. I he .312 (5/16)-inch width is to permit the swage to pass between the magazine lips. The 1 i-inch length is to allow each end ol the swage In extend Irnrn the body so that each end can he supported on blocks while any deformation caused by the swaging operation is restored to its original shape using a block and hammer. I'he end intended to enter the magazine body should have a short bevel on all four edges.

In use, the swage shuuld be lubricated with heavy grease and started into the bottom end of the magazine body. A steel spacer, ,187 (VI6) inch thick and 1 inch wide, is positioned on each side of the swage to keep it in place under the seam. It is forced into the magazine body by light hammer blows. When completely through and extending past the feed lips, the swage is supported at each end by steel blocks arid the back side restored to its original Hat shape using a block and hammer. I he magazine lips must be spread open slightly to facilitate feeding of the thicker cartridge. This is accomplished using

1/4." HEMISPHERICAL SLOT. CUT WITH BALL CUTTER

BACK SIDE

h73H

1/4." HEMISPHERICAL SLOT. CUT WITH BALL CUTTER

BACK SIDE

Homemade Rifled Line

.2bU"

SIDE VIE'.V

SIDE VIE'.V

.2bU"

Homemade End Vise
REAR END
Homemade Sten Gun

CARTRIDGE GUIDES. CHI WITH 1/4* BALI CUTTER

MAGAZINE FORM BLOCK

CARTRIDGE GUIDES. CHI WITH 1/4* BALI CUTTER

MAGAZINE FORM BLOCK

Ar15 Homemade Reciever Vise Block

S MAGAZINE BODY PATTERN

pliers or vise grips and is more or less a trial and error operation.

Sten magazines reworked in this fashion will hold eighteen to twenty .45 rounds or twenty-three to twenty-five rounds of 10mm ammunition. Lcsscr-capacity magazines can Ik* made by cutting rid reducing the length of an original magazine and rebending the flanges at the bottom for the llonrpl.ite to slide over. Needless to say. the follower spring is shortened by a corresponding ¿«mount. The follower left* can be shortened by as much as 3/4 inch with no ill effect, thus allowing a shorter magazine while retaining a larger capacity.

New magazines can he manufactured by making up a form block and bending I he sheet metal body around it. The form block should be 1.400 inches deep. .730 inch wide and 10 inches long. iTiis can be made I mm a solid bar or from thinner strips welded or riveted together. It is a fairly simple matter to rcduce a bar of I l/2r/ \ 4/4" material to sue. just as it is to fasten three

1/4" x I 1/2" strips together and cut them down in the same manner. The corners on the front side should be rounded to approximately a 1/8-Inch radius. The rear corners should be fairly sharp, radiuscd only slightly. A convex slot is cut along the eenterline on the back side of the block. I his slot should have a .125-inch radius and ran be c ut with a 1/4 inch hall-cutting end mill to a depth of .100 inch if for a .4^ magazine and .ISO inch il intended for a 9rnm. The end that will form the top, or lip end, should be rut at a v degree angle by 1/2 inch long.

Two more concave grooves with a .125-inch radius must be c ut on each side aL the top as shown in Diagram #30. These form guide ribs, which will assist in the reduction of the staggered, near double-row magazine to the single row feeding, which, at least in my opinion, is far supenor to a double-row feed. A 1/8-inch hole is drilled on center near each end and on the front side of the block, and close-fitting guide pins arc installed.

Homemade Radius CutterHomemade Radius Cutter

(»mow is cut on rear side of form block using bail cutter. C«. its to form guide ore mode wit h >nmn halt nutter.

2.700"

UPPER REINFORCING JACKET

Grease Gun Floor Plate Smg

FLOORPLATE

Blank Diagram The Ribs

It will be noted that the sides of original factory-made magazines have a slight taper toward the front, 'litis is omitted with the shop made units since the taper is difficult to form using the method described here. If the guide ribs and magazine lips are formed correctly, no deleterious effect will result.

A blank is cut from 20-gauge (.032-inch) sheet metal to the dimensions shown with a centerline marked lengthwise. Corresponding holes to fit over the guide pins in I he form block are drilled on the centerline. Hie blank is now mated to the block and the assembly clamped in the vise with the front and hack surfaces between the vise jaws and the tipper side of the block even with or slightly above the vise jaw. The underside should be bloc ked up using spacer blocks between the vise throat and bottom of the block. The protruding sheet metal K bent flat against the form block using a hammer and flat bar of metal. The assembly is then turned over and the iempfote can becemented lo sheet metal as a guide to other side bent flat in the culling magc^inc blank, same manner. An additional spacer must he added at the hack for this last side to clear the previously bent side, which now extends past the surface of the block.

How Make Homemade Vise Block
Furrrt block and sheet mnfnl Man« ore clamped in vise.
Home Made M16 Lower Parts

S'icie* ore folded using biocfe and hummer.

Home Made M16 Lower Parts

S'icie* ore folded using biocfe and hummer.

Hear sides arc folded and/ormed using hammer and swage

Home Made M16 Lower Parts
Seam is silver soldered white ekimped around form block.
Homemade Guns Action Block M16Swage BlockHome Made M16 Lower Parts

The assembly is next turned with the Iront side down and again clamped in the vise and one side bent Hat. The edge of this side is swaged in to the half round slot using a hammer and the rounded edge of a VI 6-inch-wide steel block. Ilic remaining side is given the same treatment. At this point the seam is welded or silver-soldered. The magazine lips arc bent flat against the form block and the guide ribs formed using the same 3/16-irich swage and hammer.

The upper "jacket" or collar is cut from the same 20-gauge sheet metal and mounted in place. If a number of small 3/16-inch holes are drilled through the sides of the jacket, the jacket can he welded lo the body through these holes and the welds dressed flush. A neat appearance is thus preserved. The seams at the upper corners where the magazine lips are formed are also welded and the welds dressed flush.

A flange is bent outward at a right angle to the Ixxlv at the bottom edge of each side. These are to Rears°r*)o\ded and farmed uxn* hummer and hold the floorplate. which is cut from the same 20-gpugc sheet metal and the edges bent to slip over the flanges. A hole to accept a pin that keeps the plate in place is drilled as shown in Diagram The retaining strip, consisting of a 20-gauge sheet metal strip with both ends bent upward 90 degrees, is fabricated, and a hole corresponding to Lhe one in the floorplate is ^er/aefcel in place rm mazarine body, drilled and a close-fitting pin silver-soldered in place, lhis serves to hold the llcx>rplate in place except when the pin is pushed inward against pressure exerted by the magazine spring, which will allow the lloorplate to be moved forward off the magazine, lhis permits removal of the magazine spring anil follower.

While it is possible to fppcrjactet welded in place

Home Made M16 Lower Parts

i pperend of magarin^ showing doiib!e vwiiJ llitckiutts

Wound Pics

Alagazmn wif/i cartridge in place, ready for feeding.

Home Made M16 Lower Parts

Lower end shewing cover plate in viace,

Alagazmn wif/i cartridge in place, ready for feeding.

Component puris of factory mnjyizine i pperend of magarin^ showing doiib!e vwiiJ llitckiutts

Lower end shewing cover plate in viace, bend a magazine spring to shape using pliers, a much neater job will result when il is wound around a mandrel. This is accomplished by rounding the edges of a i/8A x I" steel bar, 14 inches long. A hole is drilled through the side at one end to accept .065-inch-diameter spring wire. I he resulting mandrel is chucked in the lathe with the opposite end supported by the tail slock center. A V-shaped groove is cut across the faces of two small blocks that are clamped in the lool [Hist, fn practice, one end ol a length ol .065-inch-diameter music wire is passed through the V grooves of the tool post blocks and the extending end inserted in the. hole in l he mandrel. I he tool post is tightened to exert tension against the wire as it is drawn through the notches. With the lathe running at the slowest speed and set lor the coarsest thread available, the spring is wound, line factory spring is approximately 13 inches long and consists of 26 coils spaced 1/2 inch apart. This should be duplicated as closely as possible.

The follower is made with .1 tup section shaped as shown in Diagram 11 with a left welded to each end. I he magazine is assembled by first inserting the follower into the bottom end. The spring is then put in place, followed by the retaining strip "Ibis retaining strip is depressed against the spring, and the Hoorplate is slipped over the flanges and pushed to the rear until the retainer pin snaps in place.

It is hoped thai commercial magazines remain available and plentiful. If not, however, this need not present a major problem since, as can he seen here, satisfactory magazines can be made in the home workshop if necessary

Home Workshop Shotgun

Diagram #31 MAGAZINE FOLLOWER

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Responses

  • jodi
    How to make homemade ar 15 vise block?
    5 years ago
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    How to make home made gun bullets.?
    4 years ago
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