Info

temperature of spontaneous explosion varies somewhat according to the method of heating, but is considerably higher than that of mercury fulminate and slightly lower than that of lead azide. Taylor and Rinkenbach reported 273°. Its sensitivity to shock, like that of lead azide, depends upon its state of subdivision.

Figure 101. William H. Rinkenbach. Has published many studies on the physical, chemical, and explosive properties of pure high-explosive substances and primary explosives. Research Chemist, U. S. Bureau of Mines, 1919-1927; Assistant Chief Chemist, Picatinny Arsenal, 1927-1929; Chief Chemist, 1929—.

Figure 101. William H. Rinkenbach. Has published many studies on the physical, chemical, and explosive properties of pure high-explosive substances and primary explosives. Research Chemist, U. S. Bureau of Mines, 1919-1927; Assistant Chief Chemist, Picatinny Arsenal, 1927-1929; Chief Chemist, 1929—.

Taylor and Rinkenbach prepared a "colloidal" silver azide which required a 777-mm. drop of a «500-gram weight to cause detonation. Mercury fulminate required a drop of 127 mm. According to the same investigators 0.05 gram of silver azide was necessary to cause the detonation of 0.4 gram of trinitrotoluene in a No. 6 detonator capsule, whether the charge was confined by a reenforcing cap or not, as compared with 0.24 gram of mercury ful-

Was this article helpful?

0 0

Post a comment