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"boils'' strongly. This "boiling" is due in part to the evolution of decomposition products (mainly oxides of nitrogen and water vapor) and in part to the actual volatilization of nitroglycerin itself.

Figure 56. C. G. Storm. Author of numerous articles and government publications on the properties, testing, and analysis of smokeless powder and high explosives. Explosives Chemist at Navy Powder Works, 1901-1909, at U. S. Bureau of Mines, 1909-1915; Directing Chemist, Aetna Explosives Company, 1915-1917; Major and Lieutenant-Colonel, Ordnance Department, 1917-1919; Research Chemist, Trojan Powder Company, 1919; Chief Explosives Chemical Engineer, Office of the Chief of Ordnance, War Department, 1919-1942; since early in 1942, Technical Director, National Fireworks, Inc.

... At temperatures between 145° and 215°C. the ebullition of nitroglycerin becomes more and more violent; at higher temperatures the amount of heat produced by the

Figure 56. C. G. Storm. Author of numerous articles and government publications on the properties, testing, and analysis of smokeless powder and high explosives. Explosives Chemist at Navy Powder Works, 1901-1909, at U. S. Bureau of Mines, 1909-1915; Directing Chemist, Aetna Explosives Company, 1915-1917; Major and Lieutenant-Colonel, Ordnance Department, 1917-1919; Research Chemist, Trojan Powder Company, 1919; Chief Explosives Chemical Engineer, Office of the Chief of Ordnance, War Department, 1919-1942; since early in 1942, Technical Director, National Fireworks, Inc.

... At temperatures between 145° and 215°C. the ebullition of nitroglycerin becomes more and more violent; at higher temperatures the amount of heat produced by the decomposing liquid becomes proportionately greater, and at about 218°C. nitroglycerin explodes.

When nitroglycerin is maintained at a temperature between 145° and 210°C., its decomposition goes on rapidly, accompanied by much volatilization, anil under these conditions nitroglycerin may be readily distilled. The distillate consists of nitroglycerin, nitric acid, water, and other décomposition products. The residue that remains after heating nitroglycerin under such conditions for some time probably consists mainly of glycerin, with small amounts of dinitro-glycerin, mononitroglyccrin, and other decomposition products. These substances arc far less explosive than ordinary nitroglycerin, and accordingly by heating nitroglycerin slowly it can be caused to "boil" away until the residue consists of products that are practically non-explosive. In a number of experiments nitroglycerin was thus heated, and a copious residue was obtained. By carefully raising the

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