Figure Replacing the magazine catch

to its rearward (cocked) position. Align the hammer pin holes and replace the hammer pin. The operating slide spring guide may be used to align the hammer pin holes.

Squeeze the trigger and move the hammer forward to its fired position. Assemble the hammer spring and hammer spring plunger. Seat the free end of the hammer spring in its well in the trigger housing group with the head of the hammer spring plunger on the right side of the hammer. Insert

Carbine Operating Slide

the operating slide spring guide into the hole in the hammer spring plunger. Full the hammer spring plunger back against the force of the hammer spring and seat it into the well in the hammer.

DISASSEMBLY OF THE OPERATING SLIDE (UNDER SUPERVISION ONLY)

The operating slide stop is the only removable part of the operating slide group. To disassemble the operating slide group —

a. Grasp the operating slide as shown in Figure 32. Using the operating slide spring guide, push out the operating slide stop, small end first.

b. Remove the operating slide stop spring from the well in the operating slide.

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Figure 28. Trigger spring in proper position.

Anschutz Match Mod 250 Slide

Figure 29. Replacing the trigger pin.

Figure 28. Trigger spring in proper position.

Figure 29. Replacing the trigger pin.

ASSEMBLY OF THE OPERATING SLIDE (UNDER SUPERVISION ONLY)

To assemble the operating slide group —

a. Replace the operating slide stop spring into its well in the rear of the slide.

b. Replace the operating slide stop, large end first, into the bottom of its well. Using the operating slide spring guide, depress the operating slide stop spring and seat at the operating slide stop.

DISASSEMBLY OF THE MAGAZINE (UNDER SUPERVISION ONLY)

To disassemble the magazine — a. Grasp the magazine in the left hand with the base up and with the rounded end of the base

Figure 27. Replacing the trigger

SECTION II. HOW THE CARBINE FUNCTIONS GENERAL

Carbine Magazine Follower

Figure 30. Replacing the disconnector.

ASSEMBLY OF THE MAGAZINE (UNDER SUPERVISION ONLY)

To assemble the magazine, proceed in the reverse order of disassembly.

Figure 30. Replacing the disconnector.

toward your body (Fig. 33). With the left thumb, press up on the rounded end of the magazine base until you can move it from the retaining grooves in the base of the magazine tube by pushing to the left with the operating slide spring guide.

b. Turn the magazine on end and drop out the magazine spring.

c. Allow the follower to slide to the bottom of the magazine tube. Grasp the flange on the follower and rotate the follower out of the magazine tube.

ASSEMBLY OF THE MAGAZINE (UNDER SUPERVISION ONLY)

To assemble the magazine, proceed in the reverse order of disassembly.

SECTION II. HOW THE CARBINE FUNCTIONS GENERAL

а. By taking your carbine apart and putting it together you become familiar with its parts. Next, you learn how these parts function. If you understand how your carbine works, you will be able to keep it in working order. This knowledge will give you confidence in your carbine.

б. B]ach time a cartridge is fired, many parts inside the carbine work in a given order. This is known as the cycle of functioning. This cycle is almost the same in all semi-automatic weapons.

c. To help you understand the cycle of functioning, it is broken down into eight basic steps. Keep in mind that more than one step may be occurring at the same time. The steps are listed below in the order that they begin.

Figure 31. Replacing the hammer.

(1) Feeding — moving the cartridge into the path of the bolt.

(2) Chambering — moving the cartridge into the chamber.

(3) Locking — locking the bolt in the receiver.

(4) Firing — driving the firing pin forward to strike the primer, which sets off the cartridge.

(5) Unlocking — unlocking the bolt from the receiver.

(6) Extraction — removing the empty cartridge case from the chamber.

(7) Ejection — throwing the empty cartridge case from the carbine.

(8) Cocking — pushing the hammer into the cocked position.

d. During the discussion of functioning of the trigger housing group you will find the names of many new surfaces and parts. To help you locate these parts and surfaces, Figures 34 through 37 have been included.

Figure 32. Removing the operating slide stop.

FUNCTIONING OF THE TRIGGER HOUSING GROUP (SEMI-AUTOMATIC SETTING)

Figure 33. Removing the magazine base.

the trigger pin. As the sear pivots, its forward end moves downward and is disengaged from the hammer. The hammer is forced forward by the expanding hammer spring. This happens each time the trigger is squeezed if you release your finger from the trigger after each shot is fired.

(2) There must also be a way of stopping the hammer from going forward, even if you keep your finger pressed on the trigger after each shot. This is accomplished by the sear nose engaging in the sear notch as the hammer starts forward. The action causes the sear to move to the rear a short distance against the action of the sear spring. The sear cannot move completely to the rear because it is blocked by the trigger lip. Now release the trigger and squeeze it again, holding it to the rear. Cock the hammer slowly and see how the sear moves to the rear a short distance and the sear nose engages the a. Since the carbine begins to function when you squeeze the trigger, you first learn how the trigger housing group works (Fig. 38).

(1) Remove the trigger housing group and cock the hammer. The hammer is held in the cocked position by the sear nose engaging the sear notch on the hammer. Hold your left thumb over the hammer and slowly squeeze the trigger. Notice how the trigger lip moves upward and contacts the rear of the sear. This action forces the sear to pivot about

Carbine Sear Trip Lever

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Carbine Selector Lever

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Figure 34. Trigger housing group parts.

Carbine Disconnector Specifications

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Figure 35. Trigger housing group parts.

sear notch, holding the hammer back. Release the trigger slowly. As you do this, the sear moves farther to the rear and the hammer moves forward a short distance and then stops. The hammer is still held in the cocked position by the sear nose engaging the sear notch. This combination holds the hammer to the rear each time a round is fired.

/>. As you apply pressure on the trigger it pivots about the trigger pin. This movement is divided into a alack portion and a squeeze portion. Cock the hammer and squeeze the trigger lightly. Notice that it moves easily until the trigger lip touches the rear end of the sear. This movement, until the trigger lip contacts the sear, is called the slack. Increased pressure is required to move the trigger from the time the trigger lip contacts the rear of the sear until the sear nose releases the sear notch on the hammer. This second movement of the trigger which requires heavier pressure is called the squeeze.

FUNCTIONING OF THE TRIGGER HOUSING GROUP (AUTOMATIC SETTING)

When the carbine is fired automatically, the trigger housing group functions almost the same as on the semi-automatic setting. On the automatic setting, however, each time the operating slide moves forward the rear end of the

Figure 36. Trigger housing group parts.

Figure 37. Trigger housing group parts.

disconnector lever is rotated upward causing the disconnector to pivot about the hammer pin. When the trigger is held to the rear, the rear of the disconnector contacts the raised shoulder of the sear and forces the forward end of the sear down, disengaging the sear nose from the hammer. The hammer moves forward actuated by the hammer spring, and the carbine fires. If the trigger is released, the sear moves to the rear under action of the hammer spring, and the rear of the disconnector cannot contact the forward end of the sear. The sear nose remains engaged with the hammer, the hammer is held to the rear, and the carbine stops firing.

Carbine Magazine Catch

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Figure 38. Functioning of trigger housing group.

FUNCTIONING OF THE CARBINE

The action of the working parts during the functioning cycle is divided into two phases with certain steps of each phase going on at the same time. They are listed below in the order in which they start.

a. The first phase is the ACTION DURING THE FORWARD MOVEMENT OF TIIE OPERATING PARTS.

(1) Chambering.

(3) Alignment of the firing pin.

(4) End of the forward movement.

b. The second phase is the ACTION DURING TIIE REARWARD MOVEMENT OF THE OPERATING PARTS.

(2) Action of the operating slide and spring.

(3) Unlocking.

(4) Withdrawl of the firing pin.

(5) Extraction.

(9) End of the rearward movement.

FUNCTIONING DURING FORWARD MOVEMENT OF OPERATING PARTS (SEMIAUTOMATIC SETTING)

a. Chambering. As the operating slide and bolt move forward, pushed by the compressed operating slide spring, the bolt strips off the top round in the magazine and shoves it into the chamber. When the bolt reaches its forward position, the rim of the cartridge is gripped by the extractor. The base of the cartridge forces the ejector into the bolt, compressing the ejector spring.

b. Locking. When the bolt is all the way forward, the rear camming surface in the hump of the operating slide forces the operating lug of the bolt downward, making the bolt rotate clockwise. The bolt is locked as the locking lugs on both sides of the bolt engage the locking recesses in the receiver.

c. Alignment of the Firing Pin. Slightly before the bolt reaches its foremost position, the tang of the firing pin contacts the bridge of the receiver, stopping the forward movement of the firing pin. When the bolt is turned and fully locked, the tang of the firing pin is aligned with the slot in the bridge of the receiver and may be driven forward by the hammer. This is a safety feature to make sure that the bolt is fully locked before the live cartridge can be fired. Should the hammer fall before the bolt is fully locked, the bolt camming lug on the hammer will strike the cocking cam on the bolt causing the bolt to rotate to its locked position.

d. End of the Forward Movement. After the bolt has been turned into the locked position, the operating slide continues forward a short distance. The forward movement of the operating parts ends when the inside of the heavy portion of the operating slide has driven the gas piston into the gas cylinder.

FUNCTIONING DURING REARWARD MOVEMENT OF OPERATING PARTS (SEMIAUTOMATIC SETTING)

a. Action of the Gas. When a cartridge is fired, the gas formed by the burning powder provides a. Action of the Gas. When a cartridge is fired, the gas formed by the burning powder provides

Carbine Functioning
Figure 39. Functioning of operating parts (semiautomatic setting).

RECOIL

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Figure 40. Action of the gas.

the force for the rearward movement of the operating parts. A chamber pressure of approximately 40,000 pounds per square inch is generated and the bullet is forced through the barrel by the expanding powder gases. A small part of this gas, seeking the easiest means of escape, expands through the gas port into the gas cylinder and strikes the piston with a sudden force, driving the operating slide to the rear (Fig. 40).

b. Action of the Operating Slide and Spring. As the operating slide starts to the rear, the operating slide spring begins to be compressed. The operating slide moves to the rear approximately five-sixteenth of an inch before contacting the operating lug of the bolt. This allows it. to build up enough speed to overcome the inertia of the locked bolt. This free play is also a safety feature. It allows the bullet to clear the muzzle, allowing the pressure inside the barrel to be reduced to outside pressure before the bolt begins to unlock. This prevents a blowback of gases into your face.

c. Unlocking. As the operating slide continues to the rear, the front camming surface in the hump of the operating rod contacts the operating lug on the bolt, turning the bolt counterclockwise, unlocking it.

d. Withdrawal of the Firing Pin. This action occurs at the same time the bolt is being unlocked. As the bolt is turned counterclockwise, the tang of the firing pin contacts the bridge of the receiver. The firing pin is forced to the rear, withdrawing the striker of the firing pin into the face of the bolt.

e. Extraction. Extraction occurs next (Fig. 41). Remember that the extractor has been gripping the rim of the cartridge case all the time that the cartridge has been in the chamber. Initially the cartridge is loosened in the chamber as the bolt unlocks, due to a very slight rearward movement of the bolt. As the bolt continues to the rear it pulls the empty case from the chamber.

f. Ejection. When the front of the empty cartridge case clears the rear of the chamber, the ejector (which has been continually pushing against the base of the case) ejects the empty case from the receiver by the action of the expanding ejector spring (Fig. 41).

g. Cocking. As the bolt moves to the rear, it forces the hammer rearward and downward into the cocked position.

h. Feeding. When the bolt in its rearward movement clears the top round in the magazine, the follower, through the action of the compressed magazine spring, moves the top cartridge up into the path of the bolt.

i. End of the Rearward Movement. The rearward movement ends when the heavy portion of the operating slide contacts the front of the receiver.

ACTION OF AUTOMATIC MECHANISM, GENERAL

a. Semi-automatic Setting. When the selector is in the rear (semi-automatic) position, the disconnector lever is disengaged and is not involved with the functioning of the carbine. Since the disconnector lever is lowered and its toe cannot contact the camming surface on the operating slide, the selector is held on either setting by the locking action of the selector spring.

Figure 41. Extraction and ejection.

: W: <T A B-SwBfttf'; ¿«it b. Automatic Setting. When the selector is pushed forward, it rotates the trigger housing and selector pin. The crank on the trigger housing and selector pin rotates upward forcing the disconnector lever upward. Assuming that the operating slide is forward when the disconnector lever moves upward, the toe of the disconnector lever contacts the camming surface on the operating slide. The toe of the disconnector lever is forced down, making the disconnector lever pivot on the trigger housing and selector pin. The rear end of the disconnector lever is raised. This raises the front end of the disconnector, which compresses the disconnector spring and plunger assembly. The disconnector pivots about the hammer pin, rotating downward the projecting lug on the rear of the disconnector. If the hammer were cocked and the trigger squeezed, the disconnector would bear against the raised shoulder of the sear. The forward end of the sear would be depressed and the hammer would be released. However, with the trigger released, the sear has moved far enough to the rear so that the disconnector cannot contact the sear. Hence, the hammer is not released. The sear is forced to the rear by the hammer spring.

FUNCTIONING DURING FORWARD MOVEMENT OF OPERATING PARTS (AUTOMATIC SETTING) (FIG. 42)

a. The action as the operating slide moves forward is the same as on the semi-automatic setting (Page 28) and (Fig. 39), up to the time the camming surface on the operating slide contacts the toe of the disconnector lever. At. this point, the operating slide cams down the toe of the disconnector lever. This raises the rear end of the disconnector lever, which is in contact with the disconnector. The forward end of the disconnector is cammed upward. The disconnector rotates about the hammer pin, and the projecting leg on the rear of the disconnector moves downward. With the trigger still held back, the projecting lug of the disconnector presses against the raised shoulder of the sear and the sear nose is disengaged from the hammer. The hammer spring then rotates the hammer forward, and the carbine fires. This happens every time the operating slide moves forward if pressure is maintained on the trigger (see next column).

b. The operating slide cams the toe of the disconnector lever down during the last five-sixteenth inch for forward movement of the slide. Thus the bolt is fully rotated and locked before the carbine is fired. As in the Ml carbine, the bridge of the receiver keeps the firing pin from moving forward before it should.

c. If the trigger is released, the sear will move back over the trigger lip far enough to move the sear out of possible engagement with the disconnector. Therefore, the disconnector will not. disengage the sear from the hammer. The sear in this case continues to hold the hammer in the cocked position.

FUNCTIONING DURING REARWARD MOVEMENT OF OPERATEMG PARTS (AUTOMATIC SETTING)

a. The action up to the time the operating slide starts to the rear is the same as on the semiautomatic setting (Page 28). In the first half inch of rearward movement of the operating slide, the toe of the disconnector lever slides off the camming surface on the operating slide and rises. Since pressure is no longer held against the disconnector, the disconnector spring and plunger assembly forces the front of the disconnector, as well as rear of the disconnector lever, downward. As the disconnector pivots about the hammer pin, the projecting lug on the rear of the disconnector rises to clear the sear.

b. The remainder of the rearward movement is the same as on the semi-automatic setting.

RECOIL

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Figure 42. Functioning of operating parts (auto matic setting).

SAFETY FEATURES

a. The Safety. To see how the safety works, cock the hammer and rotate the safety downward to the safe position. As you rotate the safety downward the trigger notch in the safety rotates to the rear and in its place the solid portion of the safety is exposed to the forward end of the trigger. Attempt to squeeze the trigger. The solid portion of the safety now blocks the forward end of the trigger, preventing the trigger from moving. Since the trigger cannot move, the hammer remains stationary and the weapon does not fire (Fig. 43).

b. The Bolt and Firing Pin. A safety feature has been built into the carbine to prevent it from firing unless the bolt is in its locked position. This is done by the action of the bolt camming lug on the hammer against the cocking cam of the bolt. Note on your weapon that if the bolt is not completely rotated to the right, into the locked position, the bolt camming lug will not fit in the cocking cam and the hammer cannot hit the tang of the firing pin. If the bolt is not fully locked as the hammer moves forward, the bolt camming lug will rotate the bolt to the right. This action locks the bolt before the hammer can hit the tang of the firing pin. During unlocking, the instant the bolt starts to rotate to the left, the hammer is pushed away from the tang of the firing pin by the action of the cocking cam against the bolt camming lug.

Rebuild Carbine
Figure 43. How the safety works.

SECTION III. OPERATION

GENERAL

To use your carbine, you must know how to load it with a magazine and with a single cartridge. You must know how to fire it, and, for the safety of yourself and others, how to unload and clear it. In this section, you will be shown how to do these things.

TO LOAD A MAGAZINE

Insert the desired number of cartridges (maximum of thirty) in the magazine so that the base of each cartridge is close to the rear wall of the magazine.

TO LOAD THE CARBINE

Holding the carbine with the left hand at the balance, rotate the safety downward. With the right hand, insert a fully loaded magazine into the magazine opening, making sure that it snaps into place. Tap up on the magazine base to be sure it is seated. With the forefinger of the right hand, pull the operating slide quickly to the rear and release it, closing the bolt. Striking the operating slide handle sharply with the heel of the right hand helps to close and lock the bolt.

TO UNLOAD THE CARBINE

a To unload the carbine, move the safety to the safe setting, remove the magazine and lock the bolt in the open position. There are two methods for removing the magazine.

b. To unload a single round from the chamber, hook the right forefinger over the operating slide handle and pull the operating slide to the rear. This extracts and ejects the round.

TO OPERATE THE CARBINE AS A SINGLE LOADER

With the receiver empty, pull the operating slide to the rear and lock it in this position by depressing the operating slide stop. With the right hand, place one round in the chamber, seating it with the thumb. With the right forefinger, pull the operating slide slightly to the rear and release it. The operating slide must be allowed to go forward by the force of its expanding spring. It must not be slowed in its forward movement by contact with the hand. If the operating slide is not com pletely released, the bolt may not lock. When this occurs, the carbine may not fire when the trigger is squeezed.

TO FIRE THE CARBINE SEMI-AUTOMATICALLY

To fire the carbine semi-automatically, move the selector to the rear and squeeze the trigger for each shot.

Figure 43a. The rear sight.

TO FIRE THE CARBINE AUTOMATICALLY

a. When the carbine is fired automatically, accuracy is sacrificed for an increased volume of fire. Therefore, automatic fire should be used only when a large volume of fire is needed at very close ranges. You should be trained in the capabilities and limitations of this type of fire so that you can use it to the best advantage, keeping in mind such things as the availability of ammunition, the decrease in accuracy when firing automatically, and the demoralizing effect on the enemy.

b. To fire the carbine automatically, push the selector forward. When pressure is applied to the trigger, the carbine will fire as long as the trigger is held back and there is ammunition in the magazine. To cease firing, release the trigger.

Caution: Always release the trigger before shifting the selector to automatic. If the trigger is held back with the hammer cocked and the selector pushed forward to the automatic position, the carbine will fire.

TO SET THE CARBINE AT SAFE

The loaded carbine must be kept locked until you are ready to shoot. To lock the carbine, rotate the safety downward to its "ON" position. In this position, the trigger cannot be moved because the forward end of the trigger is blocked by the safety. When locked, the carbine may be loaded or unloaded by hand but it cannot be fired. To unlock the carbine, rotate the safety rearward to its "OFF" position.

TO CLEAR THE CARBINE

To clear the carbine, unload it as explained in paragraph 30. Glance into the chamber and receiver to see that there are no cartridges in the weapon. Leave the bolt open.

TO ADJUST THE REAR SIGHT

a. The rear sight of your carbine is adjustable (Fig. 43a), enabling you to engage targets accurately up to the maximum effective range. It has an elevation slide and a windage knob. The rear sight ramp has the numbers 1, 2, 2.5, and 3 corresponding to 100, 200, 250, and 300 yards of range. There is a corresponding indentation on the ramp for each of these ranges. The sight setting for 100 yards is also used for firing at 150 yards. The base of the rear sight has graduations for windage.

b. To raise the strike of the bullet on the target, increase the sight setting by moving the elevation slide toward you. To lower the strike of the bullet on the target, lower the sight setting by moving the elevation slide away from you. To move the strike of the bullet to the right, turn the windage knob away from you. This moves the aperture to the right and is called right windage. To move the strike of the bullet to the left, tum the windage on the rear sight. An easier way of saying all this is to move the rear sight in the direction that you want to move the strike of the bullet.

c. After setting the rear sight to any click of elevation or windage, move the adjustment knob or slide slightly in both directions to see that it is centered for that click.

OPERATION CHECKS

With the carbine fully assembled and unloaded, and the safety rotated upward (firing position), the following operation checks may be made:

a. Pull the selector to the rear (semi-automatic position). With the trigger released, pull the operating slide to the rear, cocking the hammer. Allow the operating slide to snap forward- The hammer should not fall,

6. With the trigger held to the rear, pull the operating slide to the rear, cocking the hammer. Allow the operating slide to snap forward. The hammer should not fall until the trigger is released and then squeezed.

c. With the trigger released, pull the operating slide to the rear, cocking the hammer. Allow the operating slide to snap forward. Push the selector to the forward (automatic) position. The hammer should not fall until the trigger is squeezed.

d. With the selector in the forward (automatic) position, pull the operating slide to the rear, hold the trigger back, and allow the bolt to close slowly. The hammer should not fall until the bolt is fully locked.

e. Test the safety with the selector in both positions. The hammer should not fall when the safety is moved to its "OFF" position.

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Responses

  • gino lombardi
    How do you replace a M1 carbine safety?
    8 years ago
  • ky
    How to assemble ad disassembel a m1 carbine magazine?
    8 years ago
  • beatrice
    How to replace an m1 carbine operating slide pin?
    8 years ago
  • paciano
    How to squeeze the trigger of an m1 carbine?
    8 years ago
  • j
    How to change mag catch/m1 carbine?
    4 years ago
  • agata
    How to install mag catch on m1 carbine?
    4 years ago
  • seredic
    How change m1 carbine magazine catch?
    2 years ago
  • pansy
    How replace the m1 carbine mag catch?
    2 years ago
  • Olga
    How remove M1 carbine magazine catch assembly?
    2 years ago
  • welde asmara
    How unload magazine for m1 carbine?
    7 months ago
  • ROBERT MEDLIN
    How to adjust magazine catch m 1 carbine?
    4 months ago

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