Assembling

The two complete receiver assemblies can now be bolted together and the necessary adjustments made, (Photo 41). Remove the two socket screws from the underside of the upper receiver and place the two receivers together. The two halves should fit closely together with no gap visible between them. However, it may first be necessary to lower the height of the magazine well slightly, so the feed ramp does not interfere with the underside of the Bolt. Insert the two socket screws and bolt the two...

Info

Homemade Shotgun Trigger Group

The upper receiver is constructed from an 11 V2 length of 30 x 30 x 2mm box section tubing. This is exactly the same size used for the lower receiver, except that the gauge must be heavier, namely, a wall thickness of 2mm. Before we can cut the necessary recesses into the tube, it must be temporarily attached to the top of the lower receiver using a couple of hose clips, Photo 23 . To do this, the magazine well and grip must be removed. Make sure that the breech, grip end of both tubes are...

Making A Sling

Homemade Semi Auto Pistol

A suitable sling is a very important accessory on any firearm larger than a handgun, as a means of easily carrying the weapon. Obviously, if a sling is available commercially, buying one is simpler than making one. But, as with the firearm itself, we will assume that this is not possible and making one is necessary. Let's face facts, the crackpots in power these days are banning guns, knives and any other scapegoat objects that they wish. These power crazy nutters might ban slings and holsters...

Breech Block

Rifling Machine

As shown in the previous chapter, it is not necessary to own a lathe to make a gun barrel, and similarly, a milling machine is not required to construct the breech block, or 'Bolt', as it is commonly called. The normal method of bolt construction would be to machine it from a solid section of steel. For most would-be gun makers, this method will be out of the question. However, if we only include those sections of the bolt that are strictly necessary, and ignore those which are not, a...

R Bolt Dimensions

Homemade Bolt Designs

The drawings on following pages may be used if the bolt is to be machined using a lathe, See Figure W . In the interest of ensuring the bolt is as strong and durable as is reasonably possible, we must machine it from a suitable steel. We do not want to harden and temper the bolt following machining, due to the inevitable 'technicalities' involved in doing so. Although hardening would be desirable, for the average hobbyist, it would be an unfeasible proposition. The actual size diameter of the...

Homemade Firearms

Expedient Homemade Firearms The Machine Pistol By P. A. Luty D.F.C All rights reserved. Anyone attempting to reproduce any part of this publication in any form without the express written permission of the author will be tried, sentenced and shot, and not necessarily in that order Printed in England by Bunker Books inc Direct all enquiries to www.thehomegunsmith.com Neither the author nor publisher assumes any responsibility for the use or misuse of the information contained in this book. For...

Lower Receiver

6mm Lower Receiver

We will start building the machine pistol by first constructing the lower receiver. This is probably the best place to start because the lower receiver accepts most of the guns working parts i.e. the trigger mechanism and magazine. The lower receiver is cut out, using a hacksaw, from an 11 1 8 length of 30 x 30mm 16 gauge box section steel tubing. A heavier gauge may be used up to a wall thickness of 2mm, but in the interest of keeping the weapon as light as possible, the 16 gauge 1.6mm tube is...

The Ejector

The ejector is the part of the automatic firearm that 'Kicks' the spent cases out through the ejection port during the firing cycle. With very few exceptions, the ejector usually consists of a simple blade that connects with the base of the cartridge as the recoiling case drives the bolt rearwards thus flicking the case out of the firearm through the ejection port. We will make the ejector from a 6mm diameter socket screw Vfe in length. The end of the screw is filed into a 2mm thick blade for a...

Templates

M16 Lower Receiver Schematic

The recoil shield is machined from a section of steel bar to the following dimensions. Following machining the recoil shield should look like the one illustrated below. 1 2 X 7 High Tensile Bolt The bolt section is cut to an overall length of 112mm. Cut cartridge recess and ejector slot. Fit six Ya collars and screw in bolt handle This schematic drawing shows the simplicity of the MKII design.

Homemade Pistol Trigger Sear Breech

Homemade Shotgun Flat Spring Bends

The sear is the section of the trigger mechanism that releases the breech block when the trigger is pulled. It is made by modifying a 10mm diameter hexagonal wrench, also referred to as Hexagonal 'Keys'. These are widely available from most good hardware stores. They are made from hardened steel, and because of their shape, lend themselves ideally to the construction of an expedient sear. Keys can vary in length depending on the manufacturer, but length does not matter in this case as we only...

Spring Base Machine

Block Machine Pistol

As I pointed out at the beginning of this book, a relatively easy and quick method of building a magazine is to modify a length of tubing, rather than manufacture the magazine from scratch. Unlike the 9mm magazine shown in volume one which was constructed from a single length of tubing, the dimensions of the .32 .380 cartridge require the use of two different tube sizes. The main body of the magazine is a 7 length of 25.40 x 12.70 x 1.6mm tube, in other words, standard 1 x to x 16 gauge. The...

Buying Materials

As I mentioned earlier, almost the entire weapon is constructed from steel tubing. The best places to look for the type of tubing we require are tube stockholders, who will usually have in stock all the tube sizes required for any construction. It should be noted that tube suppliers usually have minimum order charges. I would advise ordering all tube sizes required for construction at the same time to take advantage of the minimum order charges. Many suppliers also have a tube cutting service...

Machine Pistol Tube Sizes

The tube sizes shown below are those required to construct the major component parts of the Machine Pistol, i.e. receivers, barrel, magazine and bolt, etc. 1 30 x 30 x 2mm Upper Receiver 2 30 x 30 x 1.6mm Lower Receiver 3 25.40mm x 12.70mm 12.70 x 0.91 mm 1 x, 2,, , 2x20g Magazine 4 14.29mm x 3.25mm SMT Barrel 5 12.70mm x 2.03mm ,x14g SMT SHT ERW Bolt 6 15.88mm x 34.93mm x 1.6mm ERW Magazine Well 7 40mm x 20mm x 1.6mm ERW Grip 8 50.80mm x 1.6 mm 2 x 16g Trigger Guard The ERW tubing is very...

Chamber Reamer Suppliers

The following list of suppliers ship high quality 'chamber finish reamers' worldwide. Prices do vary, but at the time of writing, Chamber reamers start at around 35 20 for a .22 rimfire reamer. For the machine gun featured in this book, a reamer in either .32 or .380 auto is required. These retail at around 55. There are numerous chamber reamer suppliers available through the Internet, of which the list below is only a small example - DAVID MANSON PRECISION REAMERS 820 EMBURY ROAD, GRAND BLANC,...

Conversion

The machine pistol featured in this book can also be built around the popular .380 auto pistol cartridge with only slight modifications being required to the magazine, bolt and barrel. It is only down to individual requirements as to which calibre the firearm is chambered. The barrel is constructed using exactly the same principals described in Chapter Seven. The only difference being the size of tubing used. A length of 14.29 x 2.64 mm SMT tubing is required to construct the .380 barrel. The...

Improvised Gun Barrels

Tube sizes for improvised firearm barrels from .22 rimfire to 12 gauge shotgun. Seamless Mechanical Tube SMT and Seamless Hydraulic Tube SHT . All the tube sizes listed here offer an excellent 'Bullet to Bore' fit. All will require chambering with the appropriate calibre of chamber reamer.

Homemade Reamer

Homemade Machine Pistol

I would strongly recommend the use of a professionally ground reamer to cut the chamber of any barrel. However, if it is necessary to build your own reamer, the following method can be used. Unlike the chamber we cut in volume one, using a taper pin reamer, the straight walled case of the .32 and .380 cartridges means that an improvised chamber can be cut using a series of three drill bits. For the .32 chamber we require one, 7.8mm drill and two, 8.5mm, and, for the .380, a 9mm drill and two...