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MAUSER-NORRIS 67-69. TOP RECEIVER VIEW The locking lug on this arm is an exterior one locking down in the receiver on the right side behind the chamber section. This was the first crude form of the now world famous Mauser bolt.

In order to produce a double-side locking device, there is a comparatively big stud on the chamber, below the forward end, in the same plane with the handle; a matching counter-stud is provided on the opposite side, but this counter-stud is located slightly farther forward, and is completed by a stud locatcd on the bolt-head and extending in the same direction.

The formerly used thin firing needle has been replaced by a strong striker. The mainspring, fashioned as a leaf-spring, is attached to the handle above, and forms one piece with the snap, the lower end of the spring being fashioned so as to form a cup to receive the striker. A spiral spring is pushed onto the forward part of the striker; this spring tends to keep its rear end pressed into the cavity of the cup-shaped snap, so that when the snap is moved backward during the cocking of the mainspring, also the striker will follow this backward movement.

During closing, the self-cocking of the loc\ is effected as follows:

The rear end of the chamber has a recess, into which the upward-pointing sear snaps when the chamber is moving forward. Thus the sear stops in front of the snap, the inside face of which has a curve-shaped chamfering. When the cylindrical block is turned closed, this curved chamfering slides on the cocking stop, whereby the snap is forced back, and the mainspring is cocked.

Mauser Norris

MAUSER-NORRIS 67-69. RIGHT SIDE VIEW OF RECEIVER SECTION WITH BOLT TURNED UP AND DRAWN BACK TO OPEN ACTION FOR LOADING In this type of bolt design the bolt way is so constructed that the cartridge was dropped in through the top of the action, and the ejection was also from the top. It was not necessary to thrust the cartridge directly into the chamber by hand as in other designs.

MAUSER-NORRIS 67-69. RIGHT SIDE VIEW OF RECEIVER SECTION WITH BOLT TURNED UP AND DRAWN BACK TO OPEN ACTION FOR LOADING In this type of bolt design the bolt way is so constructed that the cartridge was dropped in through the top of the action, and the ejection was also from the top. It was not necessary to thrust the cartridge directly into the chamber by hand as in other designs.

During opening, the striker is pulled bac\ as follows: Matching shoulders or chamferings are provided on the forward part of the striker and on the rear end of the stock of the bolt-head, and when the chamber is turned up, their concerted action impart a slight backward movement to the striker. The striker can occupy the position of ignition only when the locking is completed, i.e. the chamber is turned closed, when the shoulders and chamferings face each other in such a manner as to leave the striker free play to protrude sufficiently over the frontal face of the bolt-head.

The trigger mechanism shows a trigger rod with the sear, which latter also serves as cocking stop. The sear is attached to the rear end of the rod in such a manner that when the trigger is pressed, it is forced down, so that it is separated from the snap, whereby the action of the mainspring causes the snap to fly forward, carrying along the striker which lies in its cavity.

The extractor is attached laterally to the bolt-head; a special groove is provided for it in the inside wall of the breech shoe, which serves as its guide-way when the chamber is opened and closed. When the chamber is moving back and forth, the extractor slides in this groove, whereby also a rotation of the bolt-head is prevented during the turning of the chamber up and down.

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