Single Shell Reloading

SHELL CARRIER

SHELL CARRIER

Figure 25

The 9000 series reloaders are small, complex, semiautomatic reloading factories. As a result, you must be completely aware of what is supposed to happen at each station, every time.

The drawing in Figure 25 shows a top view of the six shotshell reloading stations. You will note that your shells are processed in a counterclockwise rotation.

NOTE

In order to accomplish the reloading sequence step-by-step using only one shell, and going through each reloading station, unhook the spring and chain that activates the primer feed.

Manual loading of the primer will be necessary while reloading shells one at a time. Before proceeding, make sure the charge bar is locked as far left as possible, as shown in Figure 24.

STEP ONE

This step lowers the shell into the resize collet where it is resized and the spent primer is removed.

Place an empty shell into the carrier at Station No. 1. Then place a fresh primer into the primer receiver hole, Figure 26, and apply a downstroke to the reloader.

When an upstroke is applied, the carrier automatically indexes the shell to Station No. 2 under the reprime tube, Figure 27.

Figure 26

STEP TWO

During step 2, a new primer is pressed into the hull and the proper powder charge is added.

Again, apply a downstroke to the reloader. This action presses the primer into the shell. The charge bar lever automatically unlocks the charge bar.

When an upstroke is applied, the charge bar moves to the right releasing the proper powder charge into the shell casing. The carrier then automatically indexes the reprimed shell with the proper powder charge to Station No. 3.

Figure 27

STEPTHREE

At station 3, the wad and shot charge are placed into the shell.

Important: Do not force wads into the guide, as this spreads the fingers, preventing the wad guide from dropping into position on the shell. Placing the wad on the ram at a slight angle or resting the wad on the wad guide will hold the wad in place. The wad guide will position the wad into the shell in the proper position during the downstroke.

Using your right hand, place the proper wad on the wad ram, Figure 28. With a reloader downstroke, the wad is seated. Also, the charge bar moves to the left and drops a shot charge. At this point, because no shell was positioned in Station No. 2, the bar lock should raise, locking the bar to the left and no more shot or powder should be dispersed during the following operations.

When an upstroke is applied, the carrier automatically indexes the shell to Station No. 4.

Mec Spindex Die
Figure 28

STEP FOUR

At station 4, the crimp is started with the exclusive Spindex™ crimp starter.

A properly started crimp should look like that depicted in Figure 29. It is important that shells are crimped with the same crimp as the original, either 6 or 8 point.

When the reloader is returned to the top of the stroke, the carrier automatically indexes the shell to Station No. 5.

STEP FIVE

At Station No. 5, the closing station, the shell is crimped.

As you apply a downstroke to the reloader, the crimp punch and die move down on the casing and your reloaded shell begins to take on a factory appearance, Figure 30.

When the reloader is returned to the top of the stroke, the carrier automatically indexes the shell to Station No. 6.

STEP SIX

At Station No. 6, the reloader puts a finished radius on the shell, Figure 31.

A downstroke applied to the reloader lowers the finish die on the shell. The result is a perfectly reloaded shell. A properly loaded and crimped shell should look like the shell in Figure 32.

When the reloader is returned to the top of the stroke, the carrier automatically indexes and the finished shell is ejected from the carrier.

Properly Crimp Shotshell
Figure 30
Properly Crimp Shotshell

THE FINISHED SHELL

We recommend that the size of the shell be checked with a shell checker. If a shell checker is not available, refer to the resized brass dimensions table on page 32 for the size of brass that should be obtained from your reloader.

If at this point, you do not have a good looking crimp, it would be wise to recheck for proper components and shell case.

Not all crimps will look identical and each crimp may not be perfect. This is due to the size of the hulls, material of the hull, and the force applied to the loader.

Reloading Hulls

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