Individual Gunner Exercises And Qualification

The individual gunnery exercises train and qualify MK 19 gunners. There are four scorecards available and they are used based on the type of target (hull or pop-up silhouettes) and whether the practice-qualification is during the day or during limited visibility. Each scorecard has two tables, one for practice and one for qualification. The tables have versions for hull or pop-up silhouette engagements and for the type of NVD used. Sample scorecards are shown in Figures 4-27 through 4-30 (and reproducible scorecards are provided in the back of this manual). MK 19s will be mounted or in the tripod configuration based on the range constraints and the commander's guidance. These tables are recommended tables for the infantry MK 19 gunner and crew. The first task in each table is a field zeroing evaluation, which allows the gunner to ensure his weapon is zeroed (even if he boresighted the MK 19). If the gunner fails to zero within four rounds, he is removed from the line and given additional training before attempting the table again. Refer to Section 4-5 for more detailed description of the ranges. The rest of the table consists of firing at individual and multiple targets.

a. Day and Night Practice and Qualification. Specific scorecards have been developed for different targets and NVDs. Gunners will only fire one day practice-qualification and one night practice-qualification. Units should select the practice and qualification based on the light conditions, type of targets available, and type of NVDs used. The following table shows which scorecards would be used:

Conditions

Target

Night Vision Devices

Scorecard

Day

Hull

NA

Scorecard I

Day

Pop-Up

NA

Scorecard III

Limited/Night

Hull

AN/PEQ-2A mounted on the TWS mounting bracket.

AN/PAS-13 mounted on the TWS mounting bracket. AN/TVS-5 upgraded with the 3d generation tube mounted on the TWS mounting bracket.

Scorecard II

Limited/Night

Pop-Up or E-Type

All night vision devices.

Scorecard IV

Limited/Night

Any type

No night vision device.

Scorecard IV

Table 4-1. Scorecard matrix.

Table 4-1. Scorecard matrix.

NOTE: 1. Both the MPMG range and the multipurpose gunnery range (MK 19) can be used for practice and qualification.

2. The MPMG range, modified with stationary armor targets at the required ranges, can be used as pop-up targets if a non dud-producing practice round is used. Scorecards III and IV are used on the MPMG range.

3. The multipurpose gunnery range (MK 19) can be used with any round authorized for the range. Scorecards I and II are used on the multipurpose gunnery range (MK 19).

Every target listed in each task is a point target; however one or two targets between the range of 600 and 900 meters should be changed to an area target. The number of rounds and engagement times should be the same for both point and area targets. The commander's guidance and the local range configuration should determine the location of the area targets.

(1) Day Practice and Qualification. Due to the types of targets available for practice and qualification, there are two scorecards for day practice and qualification. One (Table I) is used when engaging hull-type targets and the other (Table III) is used when engaging pop-up silhouette targets.

(a) Hull-Type Targets. Hull-type targets provide height, width, and depth, and give the MK 19 gunner a realistic target. The engagement ranges for practice and qualifications can therefore be set for the full range of the gun and are set at ranges up to 1,500 meters.

(b) Pop-Up Silhouette Targets. Pop-up silhouettes provide a target with width and height but very little depth. Due to the high angle of fall of 40-mm rounds at ranges greater than 800 meters, it is difficult to hit this type of target beyond that range. Therefore, the engagement ranges for practice and qualifications are set at 800 meters or less.

(c) Engagement Times. There is a 30 second difference for the completion of each task between the practice and qualification tables. Practice tables allow thirty additional seconds for each engagement.

b. Night Practice and Qualification. The MK 19 night practice and qualification tables are shown in Scorecards II and IV. Units with AN/PEQ-2A, AN/PAS-13, and AN/TVS-5 night aiming devices and engaging hull-type targets use Scorecard II. Units without a MK 19/sight combination or engaging pop-up silhouettes use Scorecard IV. Gunners do not fire both. Infantry gun crews are required to qualify at night. Other types of units may determine that day qualification is adequate due to their wartime missions.

c. Scoring. Scoring is done on a GO/NO GO basis for each task within the practice or qualification table.

(1) Zeroing the gun, the first task in each table, is scored as a GO/NO GO. Giving a score for the zero emphasizes the importance of a proper zero to effectively engage targets at 600 meters and beyond. However, if the gunner fails to zero within four rounds, he is removed from the line and given additional training before attempting the table again. This step reduces the waste of ammunition.

(2) On point target engagements (lightly armored vehicle targets such as BRDMs, threat scout cars, etc.), the gunner receives a GO if he meets or exceeds the engagement standard of one or two rounds hitting the target.

(3) If area targets are included (infantry squads, RPG teams, etc.), the gunner receives a GO when at least the number of rounds stated in the engagement standard for that task impact within ten meters of the area target and thus suppresses it.

(4) At the end of each table, the scorer adds up the number of GOs and NO GOs, places that number in the "Totals block, and checks the box to the left of the appropriate qualification (expert, sharpshooter, marksman, or unqualified).

d. Range Setup. Targets should be within the ranges provided on the table scorecard.

(1) Because the gunner has to be able to observe the impact of the round to make adjustments, there should be no dead space within 100 meters of the selected targets.

(2) Every target listed in each task is a point target; however, one or two targets between the range of 600 and 900 meters should be changed to an area target. The number of rounds and engagement time will be the same for both point and area targets. The commander's guidance and the local range configuration should determine the location of the area targets.

(3) For area targets, multiple E type personnel targets may be placed on line or in wedge formations. Multiple personnel targets, indicating area targets, should not be more than 5 meters apart, and not extend more than 30 meters in width or 20 meters in depth.

(4) During night firing using hulls as targets, no modification to the target is needed to assist the gunner in identifying the target. If pop-up silhouette targets are used however, a thermal source is needed on each target to enable the gunner to acquire it with the thermal weapon sight (TWS) and a light source is needed on each target if the AN/TVS-5 is being used. The thermal source can be two chemical lights on targets between 400 meters and 600 meters and three chemical lights on targets over 600 meters.

e. Grading. One grader will be required at each firing point.

(1) Grading Equipment. During the day, the grader will need a set of binoculars. At night equipment will vary according to the type of range being used. With an impact range with hull targets, the grader will need a NVD (examples, the AN/PVS-14,7B with the 3X magnifier, the AN/TAS-4, or the AN/PAS-13 [heavy]) to observe the strike of the round. The same equipment is needed if the pop up targets do not provide feedback. The grader also needs the order in which targets are engaged and a means to provide the gunner with the range to the target for that particular firing point. The grader must be able to identify which target is to be engaged by using, for example, a range card including a diagram of the range with targets numbered and ranges listed.

(2) Start and End Time. Time will start when the target is exposed and the grader has provided the target range (the graders will provide all information before the target is exposed). If hull targets are used and exposed at all times, then the time will start once the grader has told the gunner which target to engage and provided the range to the target. Time ends when the time indicated for that task expires, the target has been successfully engaged, or the target is no longer exposed.

f. Ammunition. Ammunition is broken down by task. The assistant gunner places each belt in its order of use. The number of rounds authorized for each task will be the number of rounds per belt. For example, if there are ten engagements, there should be ten belts of ammunition placed within reach of the assistant gunner in the order they are to be fired.

(1) HE rounds cannot be fired at pop-up silhouette targets because the lift mechanism will be damaged.

(2) Training practice tracer (TPT) rounds can be fired at both types of targets.

(3) The impact of a HE round is much easier to see than that of the TPT round.

g. Fire Control. Controlling and observing a target engagement with the MK 19 is not a problem with a range set up with a firing lane for each firing point. Especially with hull targets however, each point will not have an individual firing lane. Some ranges must use the same target for more than one lane, which may be a potential problem for grading. The grader must be able to identify which round impact is from which firing point. This is especially true for the 400-meter target. To prevent this problem, ensure that only one gunner at a time engages each target. The order in which the targets are engaged can be changed to allow more than one gunner to fire at the same time. Engagement start times can also be staggered so that gunners can engage targets at different ranges at the same time. This requires a great deal of coordination and communication between the graders and the personnel controlling the range.

h. Day Practice and Day Qualification Firing Exercise (Figures 4-27 and 4-28). Table I contains the tables for day practice and day qualification for hull targets and Table III contains the tables for day practice and day qualification for pop-up targets. Other than a 30 second difference in the engagement times for each task, the practice and the qualification tables are the same. It is held twice a year, or as often as the commander feels is needed to maintain gunner proficiency

(1) The day practice firing exercise allows the gunner to fire on a range engaging hull or pop-up targets to test his skills before qualification firing.

(2) The qualification LFX tests skills practiced during day firing exercise. It is scored on time taken and target hits made based on the firing tables.

(3) During scorecard preparation the grader selects the correct scorecard (Table I for hull targets or Table III for pop-up targets) and enters the gunner's name, rank, and unit in blocks "1" through "3." He also fills in blocks "4" through "7" with the range name, the firing lane, his name, and the date.

(4) The grader positions himself so that he can observe both the gunner and the target. Once live fire commences, he:

• Observes and informs the gunner the strike of each round.

• Observes and records a GO or NO GO for each task.

(5) At the end of the practice, the grader sums the total of GO/NO GOs in the "Totals" block, checks the appropriate qualification in block "9," has the gunner sign the scorecard in block "10," and signs the card in block "11."

(6) During the qualification phase, the grader repeats the steps above by filling in the appropriate blocks, summing the scores, and assigning the correct qualification.

(7) The grader can use the comment section in either table to enter remarks such as the operation of the gun, condition of the targets, and weather conditions to name a few.

MK 19. 40-mm GRENADE MACHINE GUN, MOD 3 FIRING TABLE I DAY PRACTICE AND QUALIFICATION WITH HULL TARGETS SCORECARD

For use of thi* form, see FM 3-22.27; the proponent agency Is TRADOC.

PRIVACY ACT STATEMENT AUTHORITY: 10 USC 3012{g)/Executlve order 9397 PRINCIPAL PURPOSE: To aid individual training on targets at various ranges. ROUTINE USES: To evaluate Individual proficiency.

DISCLOSURE: Voluntary. However, mass rating and recording require some tracking method.

1a. LAST NAME

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1/261* lf4

TABLE I (A). DISMOUNTED AND MOUNTED DAY PRACTICE

4. RANGE

TbUUVAN

7. DATE

> 03

TASK

RANGE (Meters)

AMMO

TIME (Minutes)

ENGAGEMENT STANDARDS

GO

NO GO

ZERO

400

4

NA

2 ROUNDS HIT

2

1,100 ( + /- 200)

8

2.5

2 ROUNDS HIT

V

3

1,500 ( + /-200)

10

3.5

2 ROUNDS HIT

4

600 ( + /- 100)

6

2

2 ROUNDS HIT

l/

5

800 ( + /- 100)

6

2

2 ROUNDS HIT

6

400

4

1.5

2 ROUNDS HIT

MULTIPLE TARGETS

7

1,100 ( + /- 200) 600 l + /- 100)

10

4

1 ROUND HIT 1 ROUND HIT

y

8

S

9

800 l + /- 100) 1,500 ( + /- 200)

14

4.5

1 ROUND HIT 1 ROUND HIT

y.

10

s

TOTALS

h

8. COMMENTS

05£D tfß

9

. NI

JMBER OF ENGAGEMENT 10 - EXPERT 9 - SHARPSHOOTER

8-7 - MARKSMAN

6 AND BELOW - UNQUALIFIED

10. GUNNER'S SIGNATUR^-

11^ÄRADER'S SI

JNATURE

' TABLE I (B). DISMOUNTED ANl/VIOUI^ED^ÂY QUALIFICATION

12. RANGE

àiôROl

43&Ô3

TASK

RANGE (Metersl

AMMO

TIME (Minutes)

ENGAGEMENT STANDARDS

GO

NO GO

ZERO

400

4

NA

2 ROUNDS HIT

2

1,100 ( + /- 200)

8

2

2 ROUNDS HIT

3

1,500 1 + /- 200)

10

3

2 ROUNDS HIT

4

600 ( + /- 100)

6

1.5

2 ROUNDS HIT

5

800 ( + /- 100)

6

1.5

2 ROUNDS HIT

6

400

4

1

2 ROUNDS HIT

l/

MULTIPLE TARGETS

7

1,100 ( + /-200I 600 ( + /- 100)

10

3.5

1 ROUND HIT 1 ROUND HIT

8

9

800 ( + /- 100) 1,500 ( + /- 200)

14

4

1 ROUND HIT 1 ROUND HIT

i/:

10

TOTALS

0)

16. COMMENTS

7. 1/

DUMBER OF ENGAGEMEN1 10 - EXPERT 9 - SHARPSHOOTER

Mi

:T (Choose One) 8-7 - MARKSMAN 6 AND BELOW - UNQUALIFIED

18. GUNNER'S SIGNATURE

19^3RADER'S SIGNATURE

MmO OfH&fi^

DA FORM 7518-R, AUG 2003

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Responses

  • liviano
    How to setup a Mk 19 range?
    8 years ago
  • joyce
    Is mk19 night scorecard the same as day?
    7 years ago
  • Claudia
    Do both gunners have to qualify on the M2?
    3 years ago
  • stephan
    What are qualifying scores for the M2 and MK 19?
    2 years ago
  • teuvo
    How many rounds to zero and qualify with adismounted MK19?
    2 years ago
  • MILENA
    Is the mk19 a crew weapon or individual?
    2 years ago
  • ali
    How many rounds are needed to qualifiy with a MK19?
    2 years ago
  • lisa
    How many rounds per target for mk19 gunnery?
    2 years ago
  • Lauri
    How many rounds are allotted to the mk19 per target?
    2 years ago
  • michael
    How many mk19 rounds needed to qualify?
    9 months ago
  • fethawit
    How may round to qualify MK19?
    1 month ago

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