Photographs Ebooks Catalog

Photography Jobs Online

You can make a full-time living or extra money on the side from selling your photos online How much you want to make is totally up to you! Why not put some time into selling photos? You make be able to turn a huge profit just by selling them! Your hobby does not have to be just a hobby You can turn it into a full-time business doing what you enjoy! You will get the payment for your photos from millions of buyers online through PayPal, wired check transfer, or mailed checks. You could earn at minimum $1 per photo But as much as $125 per photo! What are you waiting for? You could be taking great photos and turning a huge profit off of doing something that you enjoy! You don't have to quit your job or anything to start this business You can just do what you like and start getting paid for it! Read more...

Photography Jobs Online Summary

Rating:

4.8 stars out of 32 votes

Contents: Premium Membership
Creator: Chris Page
Official Website: www.photography-jobs.net
Price: $1.00

Access Now

My Photography Jobs Online Review

Highly Recommended

Maintaining your trust is number one. Therefore I try to provide as much reliable information as possible.

I highly recommend you to consider Photography Jobs Online as your first choice.

Sell Your Photos And Videos Online

Are you one of those who loves photography but does not feel comfortable starting a career in professional photography? So you're not alone! With the advent of digital photography, it was easier to record personal moments. Also, nowadays, we have hundreds of smartphones with good cameras, in addition to the semi-professional and professional equipment, which are much more affordable. Therefore, opting for a good online photography course is your best choice. For those who do not have so much time available, online courses appear like a good way to qualify, upgrade and professional training. In the area of photography, for example, there are options that range from the general concepts of photography to the most complex editing techniques, with the use of specific software. Here, we have an excellent online photography course. Get to know him a little more and learn how he can help you value your professional resume! Throughout the online course Photography, the inscribed will know, with rich detail and quality materials, the evolutionary process of photography, with emphasis on the practices, techniques, and operation of photographic equipment. Throughout the course, you will have access to materials that will discuss the fundamentals of photography. Read more...

Sell Your Photos And Videos Online Summary

Contents: Video Course
Creator: Daniele Carrer
Official Website: www.microstockguru.com
Price: $297.00

Use of photographs of matchings in court

There has been considerable difference of opinion among investigators regarding the use of photographs in court to illustrate the matching of rifling marks, breechblock marks, extractor marks, ejector marks, etc. Some have given up the use of photographs and rely entirely upon a statement that they have examined the evidence bullet or shell and have compared the markings found on same to be identical (or nonidentical, as the case may be) with markings found on test bullets or shells, and upon this statement of their findings in the laboratory they offer an opinion. They argue that since they are qualified as experts to make such examinations it is not necessary that photographic records be made of what their examinations reveal. Furthermore, they state that photographs are likely to be misinterpreted, particularly by defense counsel, and that the jury may be misled more than informed. They point out that photographs (even large enlargements) have to be examined individually by each...

Threedimensional photographs

It may be very important to demonstrate such differences in court. The unsupported word of the expert that two firing pin impressions have different shapes (or the same shape, as the case may be) when viewed under a binocular microscope, an instrument about which the members of the jury may not have any knowledge, will certainly not be as convincing as a visual demonstration which each of them can see for himself. Since the average jury member is quite unfamiliar with even an ordinary compound microscope it would serve no good purpose to try to have each jury member look at an object through a binocular microscope, where the pupillary distance has to be adjusted for each individual, and by himself. Stereo photographs, however, are something about which practically everyone has knowledge and experience, and these can be shown to the members of the jury in a short time. The author uses a camera and binocular microscope, as shown in Fig. 98. The microscope is an older type of Bausch and...

Rim fire firing pin impressions

The value of a file of photographs has already been stressed. In this Appendix will be found the following 3. Thirteen plates showing photographs taken by the author. In each case three shells were fired and photographed in order to get some idea of the reproducibility of the markings made by each gun. In some instances the markings are very reproducible, and others showed variations. In a few instances double impressions were produced by rebounding hammers or firing pins.

Homemade .22 Caliber Rifle

9mm Bsp Machine Gun

Since I have retired from active gun work and sold my shop, I only have the small milling machine shown in the accompanying photographs. Although it is somewhat clumsy and takes more time to perform certain operations than the full-sized Bridgeport types that I formerly owned, this little machine will do anything the others will. While I do not recommend them, even the oversized drill press types sold by most machine tool companies can be used, provided the table clamps are kept tight and slow, light cuts are taken. These are better than doing it by hand, but just barely.

Comparison Microscopy

A photomicrograph is simply a photograph taken under the magnification of a microscope. It could be a simple photomicrograph or a comparison photomicrograph. The answer should be 'Yes, I took a several representative photographs for my own reference, but not specifically for court purposes. In addition, a photomicrograph only shows a small portion of any match obtained. To obtain a photographic representation of the whole circumference of a bullet, thus illustrating the concordance between the two, would require hundreds of photographs. A12. These merely take low-magnification photographs of the circumference of a bullet and are totally unsuitable for comparing the micro stria. It is also unlikely that a modern laboratory would have one of these cameras. A17. This is true, and it is by experience alone that the examiner is able to determine which are relevant and which are non-relevant stria (see A19 and A20). Non-relevant stria would include those made by debris in the bore,...

Firearms And Fingerprints In The Crime

Forensic Breech Face Marks

Latent fingerprints are only visible following the application of specialized lighting, powders, or chemicals. The photographs show an example of a patent print, a plastic print, and a latent print. An additional crime lab role of fingerprint examiners is photographic documentation of the fingerprints that are located. Consequently the examiner must be well versed in the various aspects of photography. This particular duty is appropriate since the fingerprint examiner is really the only person who knows what areas of the prints are most important and hence must be visible in photographs that are made for documentation purposes.

Setup for photographing hand guns

Good photographs of guns should show details clearly so that inscriptions, numbers, proof marks, etc. can be read on the finished prints, assuming that they are clear on the specimen. The most important element in obtaining such photographs is proper illumination. The gun photographs in this book were taken under the illumination and other conditions given in the following paragraphs. Naturally, some of the detail of the photographs was lost in the process of reproduction, either in the engraving or the printing process.

Rafaello Crio Pattern Test

Close Range Gunshot Injury

Muzzle-to-victim range determinations from powder tattoo patterns on the skin are made by Firearms Examiners, using measurements of the tattoo pattern obtained by the pathologist or from photographs. The distance at which a test pattern identical in size and density to the powder tattoo pattern on the body is produced is assumed to be the range at which the gun was fired at the individual. Test patterns generally are produced on white blotting paper. Unfortunately, experiments have shown that powder tattoo patterns on paper are consistent with skin tattoo patterns only up to 18 in. of range.4 At ranges greater than 18 in., there is no correlation between the size and density of the tattoo pattern produced on the body and the pattern produced on blotting paper.

Alphonse bertillon and the transition to dactylography

Naturalist and mathematician, and he was the son of a distinguished French physician and statistician. Ironically, Bertillon was a very poor student. He was expelled from several schools and dismissed from an apprenticeship. In 1879 he was able to land a menial job filing information cards on criminals for the Paris police. It was from Bertillon's frustration from these cards that he became noted as the Father of Criminal Identification. Bertillon described the cards as vague, with descriptions that could fit anyone. It was his enthusiasm and curiosity that drove him to compare photographs and take measurements of criminals arrested. In 1883 Bertillon's system of anthropometry received worldwide attention when it was implemented in France, on an experimental basis. Bertillon's anthropometric system proved to the world that there was a more reliable way to document criminals. Shortly after the system's release, he identified his first habitual criminal. In 1888 Bertillon added another...

Estimation of calibre from Xrays

Evan Thompson Firearms

These problems can be offset by taking two X-ray photographs of the body, one face on and one side on. These can then be used to estimate the depth of the missile in the body. A number of bullets of different calibres can then be placed alongside the body at a suitable position and then X-rayed (Figures 5.1-5.3) to estimate the bullet calibre.

Spanish Firearms Manufacturers

Firearms identifications are of interest to those engaged in law enforcement and to gun collectors, but from quite different points of view. The law enforcement officer is chiefly concerned with bringing to justice persons who have committed crimes, while the collector is interested in guns because of a fascination that only a gun collector can fully understand. Both need to know all that they can learn about firearms and it is hoped that the material here presented will be useful to both groups. The work makes no pretense of being a complete treatise on firearms investigations or a manual of identification procedures, nor does it pretend to be complete as to measurements and photographs that might have been made. It does attempt to set forth the principles of firearms identification from the standpoint of the markings which may be found on fired bullets and shells. Large areas of the general subject were intentionally omitted. In addition to the very considerable amount of material...

Forensic Microscope with the Comparison Eyepiece in position

I have purposely explained the procedure of examination with some detail because the instrument usually adopted and recommended for this work is that known as a Comparison Microscope. Such an instrument really consists of two microscopes, optically paired, and mounted parallel one to the other. One cartridge to be examined is put under one of these microscopes, and another under the other. The two microscopes are connected by a special eye-piece which enables the observer to view both cartridge cases, or portions of both cases, in the same field of view at the same time. He is thus enabled to compare the marks on the two cases just as one can compare two photographs which are placed side by side more easily than when they are seen one after the other. It is also an ideal instrument for photo-micrography, which must always play a very important part in the task of identifying firearms, as without good photographs evidence of identification must consist merely of statements of opinion,...

Correct Handling of Deaths from Firearms

Circular Defect Gunshot

The body is then examined without the clothing and without cleaning. One should search for trace evidence, powder grains, and soot. One may want to take photographs of the uncleaned wounds at this time. The body is then cleaned and re-examined for any other wounds that may have been concealed by dried blood. Photographs of the cleaned wounds may then be taken. The prosector should go back to the clothing and again correlate the observed entrances and exits with defects in the clothing. They should re-examine defects in the clothing for the presence of powder or soot. The use of a dissecting microscope is strongly recommended. Photographing of the wounds on the body is recommended. At least two photographs of each entrance wound should be taken. One should be a placement shot showing where the wound is in relationship to other body landmarks. The second should be a close-up showing the appearance of the wound. Most individuals take a third shot between the two extremes. It is helpful...

Firearms Examination Equipment

Equipment For Forensic Toolmark Analysis

Photographs show a forensic comparison microscope and a comparison of two bullets where the parallel lines are the microscopic tool marks produced by the interior surfaces of the gun barrel. identifications on the basis that two-dimensional photographs do not fully represent the three-dimensional tool marks.

Brno Zb- 50 Machine

Brno. 1934. Translation of manual describing 7.92 mm ZB 26. Drawings and photographs. Machine gun ZB 50, model 32. 1934. Brochure describes, and gives technical data and operating instructions for 7.86 mm Czech gun. Photographs. The ZB-80 pilot machine gun, cal. 7.92 rnm. Brno, n. d. Aircraft machine gun directly driven from the airplane engine through a mechanical transmission. Description, mounting, operation. Photographs.

Firearms And The Evidence They Provide

Caliber Bore Diameter

Handguns include revolvers and pistols, examples of which appear in the accompanying photographs. Pistols are either semiautomatic (auto-loading) or fully automatic (machine pistol). The difference is that a semiautomatic pistol requires that the trigger be pulled for each shot, while a fully automatic continues to fire until all its ammunition is expended once the trigger is pulled and held. Pistols use magazines, sometimes erroneously referred to as clips, to feed cartridges into their actions. Revolvers rely upon a rotating cylinder to hold cartridges and place them into a firing position. Revolvers are classed as either single action or double action. Single action means that the hammer must be manually cocked in order to fire the weapon. Double action means the hammer is cocked and the cylinder simultaneously rotated as the trigger is pulled. guns are capable of fully automatic fire. The difference between machine guns and submachine guns is that machine guns fire rifle...

Additional Reading Sources

Editor's Note The publication mentioned last, Armies and Weapons, is probably new to most of our readers. It is distributed extensively throughout Europe and the Middle East. Armies and Weapons is really a trade magazine for defense departments and armament manufacturers. They review different countries' missile systems,ships and tanks, logistics systems,etc. Test new anti-tank, anti-aircraft amino extensively and give detailed reports on all aspects of it. The ads are very tastefully done with excellent photographs. Issues run 3 each but worth every penny.

Identification Marks On Langenhan Air Pistols

Extractor marks made by automatic and repeating firearms can frequently be matched and often very effectively, as shown in several of the accompanying photographs (Figs. 31 to 35). In repeating guns, the depth of the impressions will vary considerably, depending on the vigor of the operator. Some guns will give excellent repetitive extractor marks while others will not. A loose extractor will give trouble. Some guns will produce well-defined ejector marks, but they are usually not as useful as extractor marks. The development of these depends even more on the vigor with which the action of the gun is operated. In automatics the force of the action is naturally more uniform and the results are likely to be more uniform also.

Staged Crime Scene Is Uncovered By Investigators

Firearms Examiner

The answers to these questions were provided by the latent print examiner after an examination of the husband's right hand and an examination of the knife was conducted. It can be seen in the accompanying photographs that the palm of the husband's right hand was covered with blood such that blood should have been transferred to the handle of the knife. But an examination of the knife handle showed almost no blood, as can be seen in the other photograph.

Distortion In Photography

For this reason it is impossible to obtain any accurate comparison of the size or position of two objects by means of photographs. But this point is best illustrated by an actual example. Plate XXXVII shows two photographs of the gun lock which is also shown in Plates XI and XII, but in those photographs it is in position on the gun. These two photographs in Plate XXXVII have both been taken from exactly the same angle, but in the upper photograph a long-focus lens was used, while in the lower photograph a short-focus lens was used. The result is that in the upper photograph it is possible to see daylight between the curve of the hammer and the top edge of the lock plate, while the protrusion of the sear tail below the bottom edge of the lock plate (see arrow) is pronounced. But in the lower photograph, there is no daylight between the hammer and top edge of the lock plate, while the protrusion of the sear tail is very slight. For this reason I must confess that I have never been...

The Case of the Shot Cypriot Doctor

His evidence of identification was supported by photomicrographs of the land engravings of the crime bullet and his test bullet. These photographs were taken at a high power, and the direction of illumination was quite different in the photographs of the crime bullet from what it was in those of the test bullet. This was obvious from the fact that in one series of photographs the top side of the cannelure was brilliantly illuminated, while in the other set this same side of the cannelure was in deep shade. And even then the striations in the two sets of land engraving were quite different in the two sets of photographs, while owing to the high power at which the photographs were taken they were by no means easy for a non-technical observer to interpret.

Breechblock markings

It frequently happens that the markings are so well defined and so distinctive that simple enlarged photographs, taken under proper illumination, are sufficient to show that the evidence shell and test shell must have been fired in the same gun. Fig. 26 is a reproduction of Goddard's photographs of the evidence and test shell in the celebrated Sacco Vanzetti case. The extraordinary similarity of the markings on these shells can lead the experienced firearms examiner to but one conclusion. The comparison microscope was not used in this case as Goddard, the only person using the instrument at that time, was not called into the case until later when the findings were being reviewed by the Governor. Figs. 27, 28, and 29, taken from the author's files, show such an obviously repetitive character of distinctive markings that comparison microscope (or comparison camera) photographs are scarcely necessary. Enlarged photographs (usually 8X10 inches) are better understood by the members of the...

Phase Design and Development of Gun Automatic TE Model A

The T33E3 model A weapon consists of a redesign of the T33 weapon for use with ammunition using case T7 and projectile T61E1. Most of the drawings of the T33 model were used by making revisions as required by the new ammunition. Assembly and subassembly drawings of this weapon and photographs of the engineering model which was built for testing were presented to the engineers in charge for further study.

Revolvers And Pistols

The latest design in Russian pistols, is the Tokarev Automatic Pistol, *C. C. G. P. Photographs of this weapon show it to very closely resemble our own Colt Pocket Automatic Pistol Caliber .380 except that it is somewhat larger and is equipped with a push-button nagazine release as in the case of our own Army automatic pistol, and that the slide stays open when the last shot has been fired. The barrel length is somewhat over 4 2 , the overall length about 7 . The magazine lolds 8-cartridges. This pistol is listed as being fitted *ith the Colt locking system. As it is chambered to rake the 7.63mm Mauser pistol cartridge, which has a normal muzzle velocity of over 1400 feet per second aid a striking energy of over 400 foot pounds, this lammerless Russian pistol may employ the so-called parallel-ruler locking system of our own .45 Colt automatic or may use a reduced charge cartridge.

Data on hand guns

The results of these measurements are presented here in tabulated form. The methods whereby the data were obtained have already been described in the chapter on Instrumentation. A very large number of the guns that were obtained from various sources had rifling in such poor condition as to make acceptable measurements impossible, and consequently these were not measured. This accounts for the fact that there are many photographs of guns for which there are no reported measurements. In some cases where the condition of the rifling was not as good as desired comment has been made under Remarks.

Tools and Equipment

Heat Treat Scales Aliminum Pics

Since I have retired from active gun work and sold my shop, I only have the small milling machine shown in the accompanying photographs. Although it is somewhat clumsy and takes more time to perform certain operations than the full-sized Bridgeport types that I formerly owned, this little machine will do anything the others will.

Nomenclature

Components frequently referred to are identified. In these photographs the cocking piece is shown cocked (protruding from the rear of the bolt sleeve) revealing the disassembly hole in the lower portion of the cocked piece. The bolt stop (on the left side of the receiver) permits the bolt to be withdrawn simply by pressing down lightly with the thumbnail. The safety selector (show in the Safe position) should be in the Load-Unload position when the bolt is being removed or being installed. Figure 1. Components frequently referred to are identified. In these photographs the cocking piece is shown cocked (protruding from the rear of the bolt sleeve) revealing the disassembly hole in the lower portion of the cocked piece. The bolt stop (on the left side of the receiver) permits the bolt to be withdrawn simply by pressing down lightly with the thumbnail. The safety selector (show in the Safe position) should be in the Load-Unload position when the bolt is being removed or being...

Oerlikon

Dispersion, fuze function, and amount of breech and muzzle flash were observed. Aircraft gun which resembles Oerlikon a a 20 mm guns. Photographs. Technical data, principles of operation, installation, ammunition, description of components and service instructions are given. Photographs and diagrams. Semag 2 cm machine gun. 14 Apr 1923. Description, characteristics and photographs of Swiss-made gun, based on Becker cannon.

Small Pistol Primer

Small Pistol Primer Mixture

Method of removing primers from cartridge cases where it is desired to analyze them for photographs. Punching the primers out would mutilate the pellet. Shell is chucked in a lathe and the head turned off as in figures 2 and 3 so the primers can be picked out with the fingers. The method used on such shells as figure 4 of the old foldcd-hcad type is to saw through the head as illustrated in figure 5. Anvils are removed by means of special cutters as in figure 6. This is extremely dangerous without proper equipment, and must not be attempted by a handloader. Figure 7 shows a primer which has been sawed in half. These and other micro-photos in this chapter were taken by Professor E. M. Method of removing primers from cartridge cases where it is desired to analyze them for photographs. Punching the primers out would mutilate the pellet. Shell is chucked in a lathe and the head turned off as in figures 2 and 3 so the primers can be picked out with the fingers. The method used on such...

Photomicrography

As has already been stated any evidence of identification which is unsupported by photographs cannot be regarded as being anything more than an expression of opinion. Photographs are, accordingly, essential and such as are deemed necessary must be taken through the microscope. Once again it must be emphasised that no higher power than is absolutely necessary to show the detail should ever be used. And in the case of photographs which are to be handed to a non-technical jury this rule is more important than ever. For if a high-power photograph of, say, the engraving of the land on a fired bullet is shown, the majority of the jury will probably not understand what they are looking at. But if the greater part of the bullet is included in the picture they will follow the argument for, or against, identification much more readily.

Extractor marks

Extractor marks made by automatic and repeating firearms can frequently be matched and often very effectively, as shown in several of the accompanying photographs (Figs. 31 to 35). In repeating guns, the depth of the impressions will vary considerably, depending on the vigor of the operator. Some guns will give excellent repetitive extractor marks while others will not. A loose extractor will give trouble. Some guns will produce well-defined ejector marks, but they are usually not as useful as extractor marks. The development of these depends even more on the vigor with which the action of the gun is operated. In automatics the force of the action is naturally more uniform and the results are likely to be more uniform also.

Case example

An examination of the table's surface found there to be a total of 45 complete penetrations. X-ray photographs revealed a further five missiles still embedded in the thick central supporting beams. Unfortunately, I was prohibited from removing any of these (Figure 5.5 and 5.6).

Shotgun Shell

The main fly tn the ointment with the set gun Is the gunshot wound which Is proof In Itself that a firearm was used with the EYE POPPER, the Jury has only the burglar's word that something you rigged up blinded hiir and the chances are he never got a look at the device before It was activated ( and promptly lost his chance forever). Why, the poor slob singly fired the electronic flash on your camera as he was stealing it-wtiat could you do The diagram illustrates one simple method of using an EYE POPPER. It is by no means the only way you are United only by your Imagination. A-cigar box (or jewelry box It makes an irresistable bait that takes burglars out early In the game) is rigged with a double wire pull, a 9 volt battery, and four

Marquardt

A complete set of preliminary prints of EX 4 gun and one set of photographs of model were given to BuOrd Chief Engineer who was told they were not yet covered by patents and didn't want anyone else getting patents ahead of the USA. These prints and photographs were taken to England for discussion of ship defense.

Fancy Free

THE PHOTOGRAPHS in the previous chapters showed actual guns, conceived in all seriousness. The drawings reproduced in this chapter are of unreal guns and fictitious advertisements, conceived in fun. Colt's Manufacturing Company never made, and never will make, any such pistols or revolvers.

Exactly

I have just stated that the depth of the striker indentation is dependent on the pressure. In fact the appearance of the striker indentation is one of the first points for which a trained ballistician would look when assessing the degree of pressure developed in a fired cartridge. Yet it has been asserted that the measurement of die depth of the striker indentation is one of the methods of determining whether two fired cartridges have both been fired by the same weapon. The best refutation of the entirely erroneous idea that a particular weapon always delivers a striker indentation of constant depth is Plate XXIII, which shows two photographs of sections of cartridges both of which were fired by the same self-loading pistol. The striker indentation is clearly shown in profile in these photographs and the difference in depth is too obvious to need words.

Ingram Model

The publisher wishes to thank the following organizations and individuals who have supplied photographs for this book. Photographs have been credited by page number where more than one photograph appears on a page, references are made in the order of the columns across the page and then from top to bottom The following abbreviations have been used Bentham Literary Services (Colonel John Weeks) BIS Imperial War Museum IWM Military Archive & Research Service, London MARS. Additional research by Tony Moore.

Discussion

In the case of the .38 cal. bullets used in this investigation, having a land width of about 0.10 inch, the correction amounts to +0.0014 inch. Surely no fault can be found with their statements-but, actually, in the practice of gun identification it does not matter, because if one uses the same system of measurement on the evidence bullet and on the test bullet he gets his answer as to identity or nonidentity in either case, if a positive identification by such measurements is possible. As a matter of fact, this method is rarely used nowadays to determine identity of a particular gun because the comparison microscope (or, better, the comparison camera) enables one to establish identity or nonidentity more quickly and more strikingly, and photographs of the matches between the evidence and the test bullets can be made and shown to the jury.

Repeating Weapons

Great stress has been laid upon the inclusion of actual photographs of the guns discussed, thus corroborating the old Chinese proverb to the effect that a picture is worth a thousand words and, in addition, giving the reader an opportunity to view the weapon from the camera's eye and drawing whatever conclusions arc pertinent to his interests in examining this volume.

Firing on and June

Acting upon instructions received from the Ordnance Department, the T24 gun was shipped to Aberdeen Proving Ground on 13 June 1945, where it underwent tests at the ballistic research laboratory on 14 and 15 June 1945. These tests consisted of taking time spark photographs, recording velocity of recoil, trunnion reaction, etc. Also acting upon instructions from the same source in a letter dated

Champion Flash Photography

Champion Flash Photography

Here Is How You Can Use Flash Wisely! A Hands-on Guide On Flash Photography For Camera Friendly People!. Learn Flash Photography Essentials By Following Simple Tips.

Get My Free Ebook