Weaver Standing Position

The key to successful employment of the Weaver variation is the body's angle to the target and the push-pull pressure applied to the grip. See figure 4-6. Table 4-1. Advantages and Disadvantages. Table 4-1. Advantages and Disadvantages. Additional balance, control, and stability of hold during firing due to placement of the arms (left arm bent, pistol is in close to the body). Easier to maintain sight picture because the pistol's foundation is steady. Recoil has a greater impact due to the hand...

Scanning Figure Eight Scan

Scanning is the use of off-center vision to observe an area or object and involves slowly moving the eyes in a series of separate movements across the objective area. See figure 10-2. To execute a figure eight scan, move the eyes in a figure eight pattern in short, abrupt, irregular movements over and around the area. Once a target indicator has been detected, focus should be concentrated in that area, but not directly at it. It is more effective to scan from a prone position or a position...

US Marine Corps

DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A Approved for public release distribution is unlimited. Changes Readers of this publication are encouraged to submit suggestions and changes that will improve it. Recommendations may be sent directly to Commanding General, Marine Corps Combat Development Command, Doctrine Division (C 42), 3300 Russell Road, Suite 318A, Quantico, VA 22134-5021 or by fax to 703-784-2917 (DSN 278-2917) or by E-mail to morgann mccdc.usmc.mil. Recommendations should include the following...

Types of Trigger Control

During uninterrupted trigger control, the Marine applies a steady, unchanging pressure to the trigger until the shot is fired. Uninterrupted trigger control is particularly effective at close range, when the target area is large, and when stability of hold is not critical for accuracy. To apply uninterrupted trigger control, apply pressure on the trigger while maintaining focus on the top edge of the front sight. Continue pressure on the trigger to begin moving the trigger straight to the rear...

Methods of Engagement

Moving targets, although difficult, can be engaged by the tracking or ambush method or a combination of the two. See figure 7-2 on page 7-9. Figure 7-1. Points of Aim. Tracking Method In this method, the Marine tracks or follows the target with his front sight while maintaining sight alignment and a point of aim on or ahead of (leading) the target until the shot is fired. Sight picture is the aiming point in relation to the target while maintaining sight alignment (when a lead is established in...

Presentation From a Holster Transport

The pistol is presented from the holster in one To present the pistol from the M12 holster transport, perform the following steps in sequence Place the heel of the left hand at the center of the torso with the fingers extended toward the target. (The placement of the left hand allows a two-handed grip to be established in a minimum amount of movement.) At the same time, unfasten and release the D-ring with the right hand. Use the right hand to place the thumb on the forward edge of the holster...

Remedial Action

There is no one set of procedures (i.e., immediate action) that can be performed to clear all or even most of the stoppages that can occur with the M9 service pistol. Therefore, remedial action requires investigating the cause of the stoppage, clearing the stoppage, and returning the pistol to operation. When performing remedial action, the Marine should seek cover if the tactical situation permits. Once a pistol ceases to fire, the Marine must visually or physically observe the pistol to...

Physical and Mental Preparation Physical Preparation

In combat, targets can present themselves without warning. Therefore, it is essential for the Marine to maintain proper balance and control of the pistol at all times so that the pistol can be presented quickly and the target engaged accurately. Speed alone does not equate to effective target engagement. The Marine should fire only as fast as he can fire accurately, never exceeding his physical ability to apply the fundamentals of marksmanship. To be effective in combat, the Marine must train...

Safety Function Check

A safety function check is performed after reassembling the M9 service pistol. Perform the following steps to ensure the pistol is operational Ensure there is no ammunition in the chamber of the pistol. Ensure that the safety is in the safe position, then depress the slide stop, allowing the slide to return fully forward. At the same time, the hammer should fall to the full forward position. Pull and release the trigger. The firing pin block should move up and down but the hammer should not...

Engaging Multiple Targets

Once targets have been prioritized, the Marine must quickly eliminate them. It is crucial to understand and practice the physical techniques for engaging multiple targets until they become second nature. When these techniques occur as automatic responses, the Marine maintains an awareness of the complete battlefield and is able to concentrate on the mental aspects of multiple target engagement. The fundamentals of marksmanship are critical to the development of skills to support multiple target...

Combat Mindset

Successful engagement of multiple targets requires a somewhat different mindset from single target engagement. For example, following engagement of a single target, the Marine assesses the situation. During multiple target engagements, after the first target is engaged, he must immediately engage the next target and continue until all targets have been eliminated. Because split-second decisions must be made, the development of a combat mindset is important to success on the battlefield. A...

Slow Fire Technique

Sight alignment becomes more critical the smaller the target and the greater the distance to the target. In these situations, the Marine does not engage the target with two rapidly fired shots because he has to slow down his application of the fundamentals in order to fire a precision shot(s). To engage small targets (i.e., partially exposed) and targets at longer ranges where precision is required, the Marine must employ the following slow fire technique Thumbcock the pistol for a single...

Presentation From the Ready

To present the pistol from the Ready, the Marine performs the following steps in sequence. When a target appears Sweep the safety with the thumb of the right hand, place the trigger finger on the trigger, and raise the arms to bring the pistol to the target. Note If the Marine wishes to thumbcock the pistol for a single action shot, the pistol is thumbcocked with the left thumb after the safety is swept with the right thumb. The grip of the left hand may have to be broken to thumbcock the...

Off Center Vision

Because of the placement of the cones in the center of the retina and the rods around the edges, the angle at which the Marine observes an object at night affects how well it is seen. Off-center vision is the technique of keeping the attention focused on an object without looking directly at it. To maximize the use of the eye's rods that provide night vision Never look directly at the object being observed. Look slightly to the left, right, above, or below the object. Each Marine must...

Weaver Prone

The Marine withdraws the pistol from the holster. At the same time, the Marine eliminates body contact with the deck by either the squat method or the drop method. The Marine maintains the 40 to 60 degree oblique to the target. The pistol should be rotated to the target as the left hand is placed on the deck. The Marine sweeps the safety off. Note If the Marine wishes to thumbcock the pistol for a single action shot, it is done once the Marine is on the deck. The Marine brings the left knee up,...

Weaver Kneeling Position

The advantage of the Weaver variation of the kneeling position is that it provides bone support due to the left elbow's placement on the knee. The Weaver variation further enables firing from the side of cover while exposing less of the body to a threat. To assume the Weaver kneeling position, the following steps are basic to all adaptations Make a half turn to the right, drop the right foot back or step forward with the left foot, and place the right knee on the deck. The body is positioned at...

Kneeling Position

The kneeling position offers a smaller exposure than the standing position and greater stability. Increased stability makes the kneeling position effective for longer range shooting. It does not, Figure 4-9. Isosceles Standing Position. Figure 4-9. Isosceles Standing Position. however, offer as much mobility for quick reaction as the standing position. The kneeling position can be quickly assumed and allows firing from various types of cover. Depending on the cover and the need for observation,...

Chapter Presentation of the M Service Pistol

In combat, targets present themselves with little or no warning. The Marine must have the ability to react quickly and to effectively and efficiently present the pistol, whether the pistol is in the holster or at a carry. To successfully engage a combat target with the M9 service pistol, the Marine must master pistol presentation from the carries and transport, pistol presentation while assuming a firing position, and search and assess techniques. Note The procedures in this chapter are written...

Chapter Fundamentals of Pistol Marksmanship

The fundamentals of pistol marksmanship are aiming, trigger control, and breath control. Understanding and applying the basic pistol marksmanship fundamentals ensures the Marine's effectiveness in target engagement. The fundamentals must be continually studied and practiced because they are the means by which accurate shots are placed on target. A Marine with a solid foundation in the fundamentals of marksmanship will be successful in the application of these fundamentals during combat.

Rollout Technique

In this technique, the Isosceles position is the most effective position when executing the rollout technique because the position of the body allows the Marine to better maintain his balance. See figure 5-14. To perform the rollout technique Stay behind cover, move back, and position the body so it is in line with the leading edge of the cover, ensuring that no part of the body extends beyond cover. Assume firing position and come to the Ready, ensuring the muzzle is just behind cover. Cant...

Double and Single Action Firing

When the M9 service pistol is taken off safe, it is capable of firing in both a double and a single action mode. The design of the M9 service pistol causes the first shot fired to be a double action shot. In double action firing, two actions occur as the trigger is moved to the rear the hammer moves to the rear, cocking the pistol, and then the hammer moves forward, firing the pistol. More pressure is required on the trigger to fire a double action shot due to the distance between the trigger...

Marksmanship Pistol Grip

A firm grip is essential for good trigger control. The grip is established before applying trigger control and is maintained throughout the firing process. To establish the grip, the hand is placed around the pistol grip in a location that allows the trigger finger to move the trigger straight to the rear while maintaining sight alignment. Once the grip is established, it should be firm enough to allow manipulation of the trigger while maintaining sight alignment. The pressure applied to the...

Remedial Actions For Clearing A Stoppage

Rack Slide Pistol

Remedial action requires investigating the cause of the stoppage, clearing the stoppage, and returning the pistol to operation. When performing remedial action, seek cover if the tactical situation permits. Once a pistol ceases to fire, the Marine must visually or physically observe the pistol to identify the problem before it can be Figure 8-5. One-Handed Dry Reload Prone Position. Figure 8-5. One-Handed Dry Reload Prone Position. cleared. The steps taken to clear the pistol are based on what...

Applying the Fundamentals of Marksmanship

Engaging Moving Targets

The engagement of moving targets is a perishable skill that must be practiced frequently if it is to be maintained. The Marine must practice to develop the skill to calculate the point of aim lead and Figure 7-2. Moving Target Engagement Methods. Figure 7-2. Moving Target Engagement Methods. fire the shot while maintaining the proper point of aim lead . To engage moving targets using the tracking method, the Marine moves the pistol smoothly and steadily as the target moves. A stable position...

Supported Prone

The supported prone position presents the lowest silhouette and provides maximum protection from enemy fire. The supported prone position can be assumed behind a tree, a wall, or almost any type and size of cover. It is flexible and allows firing of the pistol from all sides. To assume the supported prone position and maximize the use of cover, the position is kept as low as possible to ensure no part of the body is exposed to the enemy. If the cover is narrow, the Marine positions his body...

Natural Body Alignment

The body must be properly aligned to the target so the sights fall naturally on the target when the pistol is presented. It takes a combination of body alignment and consistent muscular tension to Figure 4-25. Increasing Elevation Minor Adjustments . Figure 4-25. Increasing Elevation Minor Adjustments . ensure the sights fall naturally to the same area of the target every time the pistol is presented. The Marine can execute the following to check natural body alignment and to ensure the sights...

Slide Assembly

The slide assembly houses the firing pin, firing pin block, striker, extractor, and loaded chamber indicator, and it cocks the hammer during recoil. The extractor pulls the brass from the chamber after the round is fired. Left Sid View Figure 1-3. M9 Service Pistol. Figure 1-4. Major Components. Loaded Chamber Indicator When a round is in the chamber, the upper surface of the loaded chamber indicator protrudes from the right side of the slide. This protrusion can be felt with the finger,...

Dry Reload

When only one hand is available, the dry reload can be performed as follows Seek cover, if the situation permits. Press the magazine release button and allow the magazine to fall to the deck. If using the right hand, press the magazine release button with the thumb. If using the left hand, press the magazine release button with the trigger finger. Point the muzzle in a safe direction and position the pistol to facilitate loading the magazine. Depending on the firing position, this is...

Stoppage

A stoppage is an unintentional interruption in the cycle of operation e.g., the slide not moving forward completely. A stoppage is normally discovered when the pistol will not fire. Most stoppages can be prevented by proper care, cleaning, and lubrication of the pistol. Many stoppages of the M9 service pistol are caused by shooter error. The Marine must be aware of shooter-induced stoppages in order to avoid them or to quickly identify and correct the stoppage and return the pistol to action....

Breath Control

During combat, the Marine's breathing and heart rate often increase due to physical exertion or the stress of battle. The key to breath control in field firing is to stop breathing just long enough to fire an accurate shot or a series of shots. Chapter 4 Pistol Firing Positions and Grip The M9 service pistol is fired from the standing, kneeling, and prone positions. Each firing position may be adapted to either a Weaver or Isosceles variation, each possessing a distinct advantage in combat. The...

Method One Pistol Rotation

Unfasten and release the D-ring with the left hand. See figure 8-11. Figure 8-11. Method One Release D-Ring. Figure 8-11. Method One Release D-Ring. Wrap the fingers and thumb around the pistol grip so the index finger and thumb are around the base of the pistol grip. See figure 8-12. Figure 8-12. Method One Grasp the Pistol. Figure 8-12. Method One Grasp the Pistol. Draw the pistol straight up until trigger guard clears the top of the holster. See figure 8-13. Figure 8-13. Method One Clearing...

User Serviceability Inspection

The Marine is responsible for performing a user serviceability inspection on the pistol prior to live fire. The user serviceability inspection ensures the pistol is in an acceptable operating condition. This inspection is not intended to replace the detailed pistol components inspection following disassembly or the limited technical inspection or pre-fire inspection conducted by a qualified armorer. To conduct a user serviceability inspection on the pistol, perform the following steps Ensure...

Trigger Finger Placement

Once the grip is established, the finger is placed on the trigger. Placement of the finger should be natural and allow free movement of the trigger finger. A natural trigger finger placement allows the trigger to be moved straight to the rear while maintaining sight alignment. If the finger presses the trigger to the side, it can cause an error in sight alignment and shot placement. Each Marine must experiment with finger placement in order to determine effective placement on the trigger. Once...

Audible Pop or Reduced Recoil

When an audible pop or reduced recoil is experienced, the Marine DOES NOT perform remedial action unless he is in a combat environment. An audible pop occurs when only a portion of the propellant is ignited. It is normally identifiable by reduced recoil and the pistol will not cycle. Sometimes, it is accompanied by excessive smoke escaping from the chamber area. If an audible pop or reduced recoil is experienced during firing, cease fire immediately. Do not apply remedial action instead,...

Isosceles Standing Position

Isosceles Grip

The key to the Isosceles variation is that the body is squared to the target and equal pressure is applied on the pistol from the grip. To assume the Isosceles standing position Face the target with feet approximately shoulder width apart. The shoulders are squared to the target. Establish a two-handed firing grip in the Isosceles variation. See figure 4-8. Grip the pistol grip firmly with the right hand. Place the right thumb on the safety. Place the heel of the left hand on the exposed...

Sight Alignment Sight Picture

Pistol presentation drills and dry fire help the Marine achieve a consistent grip and rapid presentation and aid in quickly acquiring sight alignment and sight picture. The Marine always executes the following steps Identify the target and quickly present the pistol to the target while simultaneously sweeping the safety with the thumb of the right hand. Disengaging the safety with the right thumb ensures the trigger is not pulled before taking the pistol off safe. Shift the focus from the...

Offset Aiming

When the Marine assesses the situation and determines his shots are not successful and not striking the target in the designated aiming area, he may employ offset aiming. Since the pistol's sights cannot be adjusted, offset aiming is applied to adjust the aiming area and to cause rounds to strike center mass. This technique should only be applied when the Marine determines that he is applying the fundamentals of marksmanship correctly. Sight picture will change as the aiming area is adjusted....

Weaver Prone Position

Isosceles Shooting Stance

The Weaver variation of the prone position produces a cocked leg position by angling the body to the target and cocking the leg to support the position. The Weaver prone position is ideal for firing from behind cover. See figure 4-18. Figure 4-15. Isosceles Medium Kneeling. Figure 4-16. Isosceles Low Kneeling. To assume the Weaver prone position, perform the following steps Face the target and make a half turn to the right this places the body at a 40 to 60 degree oblique to the target . Grip...

Lanyard

The lanyard aids in pistol retention. It is issued in three sizes and is adjustable. The lanyard consists of a fabric cord, two cylindrical slip rings, and a metal clip that attaches the lanyard to the pistol's lanyard loop. See figure 1-21. Figure 1-21. M9 Service Pistol With Lanyard . Figure 1-21. M9 Service Pistol With Lanyard . Adjust the slip rings so they are positioned flush with the lanyard's base clip end . Place the right arm through the loop and place the loop over the head, resting...

Pie Technique

Pie Technique

The Weaver position is the most effective position when executing the pie technique because the position of the Marine's body minimizes exposure to the enemy. See figure 5-13. Stay behind cover while moving back and away from the leading edge of the cover. The surroundings and situation dictate the distance the Marine moves back and away from the cover. Generally, the further back the Marine is from cover, the greater his area of observation staying too close to cover decreases the area of...

Isosceles Kneeling Position

Modern Isosceles Kneeling

The advantage of the Isosceles variation is that it enables the Marine to fire over the top of cover while exposing less of the body to a threat. To assume the Isosceles kneeling position, the following steps are basic to all adaptations Drop the right foot back or step forward with the left foot and place the right knee on the deck. Square the shoulders to the target. Extend the arms toward the target. Lean forward with the shoulders rolled forward and the head tucked between the shoulders to...