Typical Cases

a. Worn and Defective Parts.

(1) Malfunctions are often caused by the following:

(a) Burs, dents, kinks, and bending of magazine parts and loss of tension in the springs.

(b) Excessive wear and looseness of moving parts.

(c) Pits, bulges, rust, burs, and uneven and indistinct lands in the barrel

Figure 72 shows damage to the breech end of another pistol after the metal had become fatigued by long usage. Note the coarse structure of the metal at the break.

Pistol Structure
Figure 70. Damage caused by firing with grease in chamber and bore, caL.Jfi automatic pistol Ml 911,
Pistols Revolvers

Figure 11. Damage from firing round with double charge of powder, cal../t5 automatic pistol Ml 911.

Figure 11. Damage from firing round with double charge of powder, cal../t5 automatic pistol Ml 911.

b. Bore Obstruction.

(1) Figure70. shows a pistol in which a normal round was fired with grease in the chamber and breech end of the bore. The chamber pressure that developed was sufficient to rupture the head of the cartridge case, releasing the powder gases into the action. Note the bulged slide and the damaged top round from the magazine.

(2) Figure 69 pictures the damage caused by firing a normal round with a bullet in the bore. A bullet may lodge in the bore when fired from a cartridge containing damp powder, and some of the powder grains will be unburned. Figure* 69a shows darkened, unburned powder grains adhering to fhe base of the lodged bullet. Observe the long split in the barrel and the two bullets recovered from the bore.

(3) The powder chargc in the cal..45 pistol cartridge sometimes creates insufficient power to expel the bullet from the barrel. The lodged bullet will obstruct the passage of the next round and blow up the barrel.

Barrett Cal Bullet

RA PD 23966

Figure 72. Damage to breech end of barrel caused by fatigue of metal, cal.45 automatic pistol Ml 911.

09 Ui

SERVICEABILITY CHART—PISTOL, CAL. .45, M1911 AND 1911A1

item

in the hands of troops

to accompany troops overseas

to be placed in storage for reissue

finish

Exposed surface! ihcoid be dull enoaflh to p^eveni glare.

Inraet enouoh to prevertr glare.

Approximate n*w finish

bore

Pillirto l**s rhwi the widih of land or groove and less lhan 3/8" long is acceptable.

firve uniloem pitting, bur wilh >h£»rp lands, i> dttepfcsbli!.

A lew f ne pi is. but ihwp lard*. die accepidbU?

trigger

Min 5 lb

Min. 5 lb

M.n 5 \\1 lb

pull

Mo* 6 1/2 lb

6 l/2 lb

M** 6 lb

PART TWO — REVOLVERS

CHAPTER ONE—GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS, REVOLVERS COLT Ml917 AND DETECTIVE SPECIAL, AND SMITH AND WESSON Ml917

Section I

GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS, COLT REVOLVER M1917

56. DESCRIPTION.

a. The Colt Revolver, Cal. .45, M1917, is a six-shot, breech-loading, hand weapon . It is provided with a swing-out type cylinder having six cnambers arranged about a central axis so that six shots may be fired before reloading is necessary. The chambers of the cylinder are loaded with six cartridges in clips of three rounds. When the cylinder is closed, the revolver is ready for firing. It may be fired either single-action or double-action.

b. The action of cocking the hammer, either in single- or double-action firing, causes the cylinder to rotate and aline the next chamber with the barrel. The rate of fire is limited only by the dexterity of the operator in reloading the cylinder and his ability to aim and squeeze.

c. The Colt revolver is designed to fire CARTRIDGE, ball, cal. .45,

M1911. (See Supplement B )

57. GENERAL DATA.

a. Characteristics.

Weight 2Vi lb

Total length 10.8 in.

Barrel.

Diameter of rifling 0.452 in.

Diameter of bore 0.445 in.

Rifling, number of grooves 6

Grooves:

Width 0.156 in.

Depth 0.0035 in.

Twist, one turn in 16 in.

Front sight above axis of bore 0.7325 in.

Cylinder:

Length 1.595 in.

Diameter 1-695 in.

00 00

M1911 Assembly

Figure 73. — Right Side of Colt Revolver Ml977

Colt Revolvers

FRONT StGHT

NO LUG ON BARREL'

thumb latch

CLOCKWISE ROTATION OF CYLINDER

SIDE PLATE ON LEFT SIDE OF FRAME

LONG STOCKS

Figure 74- - Left Side of Colt Revolver M1917 Showing Exterior Differences Between It and Smith and Wesson M1917

Sectional View Colt Revolver M1917

SIGHT, FRONT

CYLINDER

RATCHET

I BUSHING, EJECTOR / ROD GUIDE >

BARREL

SPRING. EJECTOR

PIN, TRIGGE

FRAME

SAFETY PIN, SAFETY LEVER, SAFETY SCREW, BOLT BOLT

PIN, TRIGGER AND SAFETY

TRIGGER

SPRING, BOLT

RIVET, SWIVEL

PLATE, RECOIL RIVET, \ PIN/

LATCH

PIN, FIRING

RRING PIN

STRUT PIN, STRUT

SPRING, STRUT HAMMER PIN, HAMMER

STIRRUP PIN, STIRRUP

MAINSPRING

PIN, REBOUND LEVER

SCREW, STOCK

STOCK

PIN, STOCK

STUD, SWIVEL

ROD, EJECTOR

CRANE Additional Pnrt* Nr>* IndU

Additional Parts Not Indicated In Main View

RING, SWIVEL

LOCK, CRANE

SCREW, CRANE LOCK

Figure 75 — Sectional View of Colt Revolver M1917

Number of chambers . Diameter of chambers:

Maximum

Minimum

Trigger poll

0.4795 in.

Section II

FUNCTIONING, COLT REVOLVER Ml 917

58. FUNCTIONING.

a. Pulling backward on the latch with the thumb disengages the latch pin from the ejcctor and permits the cylinder to pivot on the crane and swing outward to the left. The cylinder can then be loaded with two clips of three cartridges each.

NOTE: This action should never be accomplished with a snap or jerk since doing so might strain the crane.

J>. The latch pin is under pressure of the latch spring, which is located in a hole in the side plate to the rear of the latch slot. Under this pressure, the latch pin is forced into the recess in the ejector when the cylinder is swung back into the frame. The cylinder is thus locked in position for firing (fig. 76.).

e. In firing double-action, pressure of the finger upon the trigger causes the upper edge of the trigger to engage the hammer strut. The hammer is thereby raised until nearly in full-cock position, when the strut escapes from the trigger, allowing the hammer to fall. Also, when the trigger is pulled back, the safety lever which is attached to it, pulls

Revolver Hammer Down
Figure 76—Sectional View of Co It Revolver MT9T7, Hammer Down,

Cylinder Loaded

Technical Drawing Open Revolver
Figure 77. - Sectional View of Colt Revolver M1917, Hammer Back,

Trigger Hack the safety out of the path of the hammer, so that when the hammer falls it will strike the cartridge.

d. In firing single-action, the hammer is first pulled back with the thumb until the upper edge of the trigger engages in the full-cock notch in the front end of the lower part of the hammer. The backward movement of the trigger also disengages the safety as when firing double-action (fig. 77.).

NOTE: In firing single- or double-action, notice that the trigger must remain back while the hammer falls, so that the safety will remain out of the path of the hammer and can strike the cartridge. If the trigger is allowed to return to its normal position between the time the hammer falls and comes close to the cartridge, the safety will be re-engaged and prevent the hammer from striking it.

e. Simultaneously with the movement of the trigger in cocking the hammer, the nose of the bolt is withdrawn from the cylinder. This is caused by the rear end of the bolt coming into contact with the lug on the rebound lever. The hand can then rotate the cylinder. The hand which is pivoted to the trigger, swings on its pin and is raised. Its upper nose engages the ratchet on the cylinder causing it to revolve.

f. As the trigger continues its rearward movement, the lug on the rebound lever slips off the rear end of the bolt. This permits the nose of the bolt to drop into the proper recess in the cylinder the instant he hand has rotated it. In this manner, the next chamber is brought

Colt Revolver
Figure 18.— Sectiona/ View of Colt Revolver M1917, Hammer Striking Cartridge, Trigger Back, Cartridge Empty

into alincment with the barrel. When the hammer falls at the time of firing, both the hand and the holt, thus lock the cylinder in such a position that the chamber of the cylinder coincides with the axis of the barrel (fig. 78). The pressure of the rebound lever on the lug on the hand insures its engagement with the ratchet until the trigger is released.

NOTE: The bolt also prevents the cylinder from making more than one-sixth of a revolution each time the revolver is cocked.

g. When the trigger is released after firing a shot, the rebound lever, under the pressure of the lower arm of the main spring, forces the hammer back to its safety position. The trigger is also forced forward. The safety lever moves the safety upward in front of the hammer by this same motion. Thus, the hammer can strike the cartridges only when the trigger is pulled.

h. After firing, the cylinder is again swung open and cartridges or cartridge cases, including clips, are ejected from the cylinder by pressure of the finger on the front end of the ejector rod to the rear end of which the ejector and ratchet are attached. This action counteracts the pressure of the ejector spring inside the center arbor of the crane and pushes the ejector out of its recess in the rear end of the cylinder. The spring also forces the ejector to return to its position inside the cylinder, when pressure is released from the forward end of the rod.

GENERAL CHARACTERICTICS, SMITH AND WESSON

REVOLVER Ml917

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  • william green
    How to draw gun hammer and trigger?
    5 months ago

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