Table A Classification of resources

b. Training Support Center. Training support centers (TSCs) are located throughout the world and are the POCs for training aids and devices. Each TSC provides training aid services to customers in their geographic area of support to include active Army units and schools, Reserve Components, and ROTC units.

NOTE: For more information concerning TSC operations, write Commander, United States Army Training Support Center, ATTN: ATIC-DM, Fort Eustis, VA 23604.

c. Training Devices and Exercises. Several marksmanship training devices are available to aid in sustainment training. They are beneficial when ammunition is limited for training or practice exercises such as field firing on the weaponeer or zeroing and qualifying with SRTA. Some training devices are complex, costly, and in limited supply, while others are relatively simple, cheap, and in large supply. Devices and aids can be used alone or in combinations. Individuals or squads can sustain and practice basic marksmanship skills and fundamentals with devices and or aids.

(1) Dominant Eye Training. This exercise assists the coach and the firer in determining which eye the firer should use when engaging targets. The firer's dominant eye should be identified early in the training process to prevent unnecessary problems such as a blurred sight picture or the inability to acquire a tight shot group during the grouping exercise.

(a) Cut a 1-inch circular hole in the center of an 8- by 10-inch piece of material (can be anything from paper to plywood).

(b) The trainer positions himself approximately 5 feet in front of the soldier. The trainer closes his nondominant eye and holds his finger up in front of and just below his dominant eye to provide the soldier with an aiming point.

(c) The soldier holds the training aid with both hands at waist level and looks with both eyes open at the trainer's open eye. With both eyes focused on the trainer's open eye and arms fully extended, the soldier brings the training aid up between himself and the trainer while continuing to look at the trainer's eye through the hole in the training aid. The soldier's eye the trainer sees through the hole in the training aid is the soldier's dominant eye.

(2) Aiming Card. The M15A1 aiming card (Figure A-1) determines if the soldier understands how to aim at target center of mass. The card is misaligned, the soldier is instructed to establish the correct point of aim, and a trainer checks it. Several aiming drills provide an understanding of center of mass. This card may be used to ensure the soldier understands adjustment of the aiming point, how to allow for gravity, and how to engage a moving target. The sight-target relationship on the card is the same visual perception the soldier should have when he is zeroing on a standard silhouette target. Each soldier will demonstrate six out of six of the aim points. The soldier will show three side alignment techniques—place the front site post on the left or right edge of the target and bring the front site post to center of mass of the target. The soldier will then show the bottom-up alignment technique—place the front site post at the bottom of the target then bring the front site post to center of mass of the target.

M15A1 AIMING CARD

THFS CARD SHOWS THE FRONTSIGHT POST PROPERLY CENTERED IN THE REAR SIGHT APERTURE (HOLE)

MOVE THE TARGET TO CORRECTLY PLACE THE AIMING POINT AT CENTER OF VISIBLE MASS

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