Unit Livefire Exercises

Unit live-fire exercises are planned, prepared, and performed as outlined in the mission training plan for the infantry platoon and squad. The soldier performs marksmanship tasks under realistic combat conditions within the framework of these exercises.

NOTE: Table 1-1 shows training devices a commander may use to sustain weapons proficiency. (See Appendix A for details on these training devices.) The devices replicate, but are not intended to replace, live-fire exercises or qualifications. Active and Reserve Component units should consult DA Pam 350-38, Standards in Weapons Training, for regulatory guidance on mandatory live-fire training and qualification events. This DA Pam can best be accessed online at http://www.atsc.army.mil/atmd/strac/index.htm for the latest approved version.

EXERCISE

TRAINING DEVICE

Short Range

Training Ammunition and M2 Bolt

Weaponeer

Engagement Skills Trainer

Military Arcade Computer System (MACS)

Location of Misses and

Hits (LOMAH)

Zero

X

X

X

X

Practice Fire

X

X

X

X

Record Fire

X

X

X

NBC Practice

X

X

X

X

NBC Record

X

X

X

Unassisted Night Practice

X

X

Unassisted Night Record

X

X

NVD Zero

X

X

NVD Practice

X

X

NVD Record

X

X

Advanced Skills

X

X

X

Table 1-1. Training devices and exercises.

Table 1-1. Training devices and exercises.

a. During training, the fundamentals must apply to combat as well as to the range. Too often soldiers disregard the fundamentals while under the pressure of combat. Therefore, it is imperative the soldier receives feedback regarding his firing results and his use of the fundamentals during collective live-fire exercises. This training should also discuss target acquisition, area fire, quick fire, assuming firing positions, responding to oral fire commands, and safety. Dry fire or MILES rehearsals at crawl, walk, and run paces are required to learn SOPs and proper procedures.

b. Enough evaluators must be present during training to observe each soldier to provide performance feedback. The evaluator must know the scenario, the location of targets, the friendly plan, and SOPs. He must watch to determine if the soldier identifies targets in his sector and successfully engages them. The evaluator must also know the fundamentals of marksmanship to detect soldiers' mistakes and review them during the after-action review (AAR).

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