Windage and Elevation Rules

Moving the front sight post, elevation knob, or windage knob one graduation or notch is referred to as moving one click on the sight. The windage and elevation rules define how far the strike of the round will move on the target for each click of front and rear sight elevation or rear sight windage for each 100 yards of range to the target. a. Front Sight Elevation Rule. One click of front sight elevation adjustment will move the strike of the round on the target approximately 1 H inches for...

Figure Correct Sight Alignment

Sight picture is the placement of the tip of the front sight post in relation to the target while maintaining sight alignment. Correct sight alignment but improper sight placement on the target will cause the bullet to impact the target incorrectly. To achieve correct sight picture, place the tip of the front sight post at the center of the target while maintaining sight alignment (see figure 4-2). Center mass is the correct aiming point so that point of aim point of impact is...

Engaging Targets While Wearing the Field Protective Mask

While engaging targets in a combat environment, a Marine is under considerable stress caused by fear, fatigue, and the noise of battle. His stress is further aggravated by the fear and uncertainty associated with a nuclear, biological, and chemical (NBC) threat. However, a Marine must be able to operate under any battlefield condition, including an NBC environment. If a Marine wears the field protective mask, its bulk and reduced visibility can affect his firing position which in turn affects...

C Three Elements of a Good Shooting Position as they Apply with the Loop Sling There

13 are three elements of a good shooting position that apply when using a loop sling 14 (1) Bone Support. The body's skeletal structure provides a stable foundation to support the 15 rifle's weight. A weak shooting position will not withstand the repeated recoil of a rifle when 16 firing at the sustained rate or buffeting from wind. To attain a correct shooting position, the 17 bones of the body must support as much of the rifle's weight as possible. Proper use of the 18 sling provides...

Placement of the Buttstock in the Shoulder Placement of the buttstock in the shoulder

14 pocket may have to be altered due to the mask's added bulk. If the rifle is canted, a Marine 15 may place the buttstock of the rifle just outside of the pocket to achieve sight alignment. 16 Holding the rifle straight is the preferred method of obtaining sight alignment. However, if 17 sight alignment cannot be achieved in this position, a Marine may alter the hold of the rifle to 18 bring the aiming eye in line with the sights. Canting the rifle drastically affects the rifle's zero. 19 A...

Engaging Targets During Low Light and Darkness

Combat targets are frequently engaged during periods of darkness or under low-light conditions. Basic marksmanship fundamentals do not change, however, the principles of night vision must be applied and target detection is applied differently. During periods of darkness or low light, a Marine's vision is extremely limited. A Marine must apply the techniques of night observation in order to detect potential targets, and he must develop skills that allow him to engage targets under these...

Field Expedient Battlesight Zeroing

19 BZO is the elevation and windage setting established at 300 yards that enables a Marine to engage 20 point targets from 0-300 yards under ideal weather conditions. If a 300-yard range is not 21 available, a field expedient BZO can be established at a reduced range of 36 yards. When a rifle is 22 zeroed for 300 yards, the bullet crosses the line of sight twice. It first crosses the line of sight on 23 its upward path of trajectory at 36 yards, and again farther down range at 300 yards (see...

Figure Right Elbow

The placement of the shooter's cheek against the stock should remain firm and consistent from shot to shot. Consistency of stock weld is achieved through proper placement of the rifle butt in the pocket of the shoulder. A firm contact between the cheek and the stock enables the head and rifle to recoil as a single unit. This provides quick recovery between rapid fire shots, keeps the aiming eye centered in the rear sight aperture, and prevents the head from bouncing off the stock...

Factors Causing a BZO to be Reconfirmed

Marines are responsible for maintaining a BZO on their rifles at all times. Many factors influence the BZO of a rifle. If operating in a combat environment, Marines should confirm their BZO as often as possible. Atmospheric conditions, humidity, and temperature can cause BZOs to change on a daily basis. To confirm a BZO, a Marine may begin the zeroing process by using the previously established BZO sight settings rather than placing the sights at initial sight setting. The following factors...

A Temperature

32 1 Extreme changes in temperature cause fluctuation in the rifle's chamber pressure. This 33 fluctuation is caused by changes in the propellant's temperature. In cold weather, as rifle chamber pressure decreases, the bullet exits the muzzle at a lower velocity, and the bullet impacts the target below the point of aim. In extreme heat, the rifle's chamber pressure increases causing the bullet to exit the muzzle at a higher velocity and impact the target above the point of aim. Hot air is less...

Clearing Barrel Procedures Chapter Fundamentals of Marksmanship

5001 Select a Firing Position 5-1 5002 Types and Uses of the Rifle Web Sling 5-1 5006 Kneeling Position 5-15 5007 Sitting Position 5-18 5008 Standing Position 5-24 Chapter 6. Use of Cover and Concealment 6001 Cover and Concealment 6-1 6002 Supported Firing Positions 6-4 6003 Searching for Targets and Engaging Them From Behind Cover 6-9 6004 Moving Out From Behind Cover 6-10 7001 Presentation of the Rifle 7-1 7002 Search and Assess 7-5 8001 Physical Effects of Wind on the Bullet 8-1 8002...

Figure Clearing Barrel

On the command Load, the Marine will perform the following steps to take the rifle from Condition 4 to Condition 3 With a straight trigger finger, point the rifle in the clearing barrel. Ensure the rifle is in Condition 4. Withdraw a magazine from the magazine pouch. Ensure the magazine is filled. Fully insert the magazine into the magazine well. Without releasing the magazine, tug downward on the magazine to ensure it is seated. Close the ejection port cover. c....

Engaging Moving Targets

In combat, it is unlikely that a target will remain stationary. The enemy will move quickly from cover to cover, exposing himself for the shortest possible time. Therefore, a Marine must quickly engage a moving target before it disappears. a. Types of Moving Targets. There are two types of moving targets moving targets and stop and go targets. Moving targets move in a consistent manner and remain in a Marine's field of vision. A walking or running man is an example of a moving target. A stop...

C Seven Factors Common to All Shooting Positions as they Apply with the Hasty Sling

There are seven factors common to all shooting positions see Figure 5-6 . In a hasty sling configuration, the sling is attached to the upper and lower sling swivels of the rifle. When the left arm is placed in the hasty sling, tension created by the sling travels from side to side. The tension created by the sling affects how the position is established. There are fundamental differences between the application of the seven factors when using the hasty sling. The most marked of these is...

Engaging Multiple Targets

When engaging multiple targets, a Marine must prioritize targets and carefully plan his engagements to ensure successful target engagement. Mental preparedness and the ability to make split-second decisions are the key to successful engagement of multiple targets. The proper mindset allows a Marine to react instinctively and to control the pace of the battle rather than just reacting to the threat. After the first target is engaged, a Marine must immediately engage the next target and continue...

Offset Aiming

The conditions of rifle fire in combat may not permit mechanical adjustments of the sights. To engage a target during combat, a Marine may be required to aim his rifle at a point on the target other than center mass. This is known as offset aiming. Offset aiming is used to compensate for the distance and size of the target, wind, and speed and angle of a moving target. There are two primary techniques for offset aiming point of aim technique and known strike of the round. a. Point of Aim...

Rifle Marksmanship

DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY Headquarters, United States Marine Corps Washington, DC 20380-0001 Marine Corps Reference Publication MCRP 3-01A, Rifle Marksmanship, provides the doctrine, techniques, and procedures for Marine Corps rifle marksmanship. Every Marine is first and foremost, a rifleman. MCRP 3-01A reflects this ethos and the Marine Corps warfighting philosophy. This publication discusses the individual skills required for effective rifle marksmanship, and standardizes the techniques and...