Observe for Indicators

Once the rifle ceases firing, the Marine must visually or physically observe the ejection port to identify the problem before he can clear it. The steps taken to clear the weapon are based on observation of one of the following three indicators Indicator The bolt is forward or the ejection port cover is closed. See figures 3-13 and 3-14. Indicator The bolt is forward or the ejection port cover is closed. See figures 3-13 and 3-14. To return the weapon to operation l Seek cover if the tactical...

Wind

Calculate the windage adjustment to compensate for the string of fire's wind conditions the same way it was calculated in the BEFORE FIRING information of the data book. The only exception is now windage adjustments are being removed from the rifle rather than added to the rifle. Because the windage setting is being removed from the rifle, remove the number of clicks of windage right or left from the ZERO windage setting. Once the windage setting is determined, record it in the WIND column.

Three Round Burst Technique

When set on burst, the design of the rifle permits three shots to be fired from a single trigger pull. The rounds fire as fast as the weapon will function and cause the muzzle to climb during recoil. The ability to manage recoil is extremely important when firing the rifle on burst. To achieve the desired effect (i.e., 3 rounds on target), the Marine must control the jump angle of the weapon to maintain the sights on target. At short ranges (i.e., 25 meters or less), firing on three-round burst...

Two Shot Technique

In combat, an effective technique for eliminating a threat is to rapidly fire more than one shot on the target. Two shots fired in rapid succession will increase the trauma (i.e., shock, blood loss) on the target, increasing the Marine's chances of quickly eliminating the threat. Firing two shots enables the Marine to break out of the tunnel vision often associated with firing in combat and then assess the situation to determine follow-on action. To execute the two-shot technique, the Marine...

Known Strike of the Round

This offset aiming technique shifts the aiming point (sight picture) to compensate for rounds that strike off target center. The known strike of the round method is used if the strike of the round is known. To engage a target using this method, a Marine aims an equal distance from center mass opposite the known strike of the round. For example, if the round strikes high and left, a Marine aims an equal and opposite distance low and right. Table 10-1. Points of Aim for Full Value Winds. Table...

Windage

Predetermined points of aim sector the target vertically (see fig. 10-6). The tip of the front sight post centered on the edge of the target into the wind is considered one point of aim the trailing edge of the front sight post held on the edge of the target into the wind is considered two points of aim. The same units of measure are applied off the target for holds of additional points of aim. These points of aim are used to compensate for wind affecting the strike of the round and when there...

Cocked Leg Prone Position with the Loop Sling

How Roll The Ground With Rifle

Apply the three elements and seven factors to this position (para. 5004). To assume the cocked leg prone position with the loop sling, either move forward or drop back into position (see figs 5-30, 5-31, and 5-32) l Once on the ground, roll the body to the left side and extend and invert the left elbow on the ground. The left leg is stretched out behind you, almost in a straight line. This allows the mass of the body to be placed behind the rifle to aid in absorbing recoil. l Turn the toe of...

Types of Supported Positions Supported Prone

If possible, a Marine should use the supported prone position when firing from behind cover. This position is the steadiest, provides the lowest silhouette, and provides maximum protection from enemy fire. l Support the position by placing the handguards, the forearm, or the magazine on or against support (see fig. 6-21). l The prone position can be assumed behind a tree, a wall, a log, or almost any type of cover. It is flexible and allows shooting from all sides of cover and from cover of...

Show Clear Transfer

When time and the tactical situation permit, the Marine should transfer the rifle using the show clear transfer. To properly pass a rifle between Marines, the Marine handing off the rifle must perform the following procedures l Ensure the rifle is on safe. l Remove the magazine if it is present. l Lock the bolt to the rear. l Visually inspect the chamber to ensure there is no ammunition present. l Leave the bolt locked to the rear and hand the weapon to the other Marine. The Marine receiving...

Muscular Relaxation

Once bone support is achieved, muscles are relaxed. Muscular relaxation helps to hold the rifle steady and increase the accuracy of the aim. Muscular relaxation also permits the use of maximum bone support to create a minimum arc of movement and consistency in resistance to recoil. Muscular relaxation cannot be achieved without bone support. During the shooting process, the muscles of the body must be relaxed as much as possible. Muscles that are tense will cause excessive movement of the...

Presenting the Rifle From the Weak Side Sling Arms Transport

The hasty sling should be maintained while presenting the rifle from this transport. To present the rifle from Weak Side Sling Arms, a Marine performs the following steps once a target appears i While looking at the target, lean forward slightly to facilitate removal of rifle from the shoulder. i Grasp the sling with the right hand to prevent the rifle from falling off the shoulder. Grasp handguards with left hand (the index finger points toward the muzzle). See figure 7-6. Rotate the rifle...

Hasty Sight Setting

While a BZO is considered true for 300 meters, a Marine must be capable of engaging targets beyond this distance. The rifle's sighting system allows sight settings for distances out to 800 meters in 100-meter increments. If a Marine must establish a BZO for extended ranges, it is referred to a hasty sight setting. To achieve a hasty sight setting, a Marine dials the appropriate range numeral on the rear sight elevation knob that corresponds to the range to the target. For example, if the rear...

Placement of Buttstock in the Shoulder

Placement of the buttstock in the shoulder pocket may have to be altered due to the mask's added bulk. If the rifle is canted, a Marine may place the buttstock of the rifle just outside the pocket of the shoulder to achieve sight alignment. Holding the rifle straight is the preferred method of obtaining sight alignment. However, if sight alignment cannot be achieved in this position, a Marine may alter the hold of the rifle to bring the aiming eye in line with the sights. Canting the rifle...

Zeroing Process

During the zeroing process, all elevation adjustments are made on the front sight post. Once a BZO is established, the front sight post should never be moved, except when rezeroing the rifle. (The rear sight elevation knob is used for dialing in the range to the target.) Zeroing is conducted at a range of 300 yards meters. To prepare a rifle for zeroing, the rifle sights must be adjusted to the initial sight settings as outlined in paragraph 9005. Perform the following steps to zero the rifle...

Engaging Targets while Wearing the Field Protective Mask

While engaging targets in a combat environment, a Marine is under considerable stress caused by fear, fatigue, and the noise of battle. His stress is further aggravated by the fear and uncertainty associated with a nuclear, biological, and chemical NBC threat. However, a Marine must be able to operate under any battlefield condition, including an NBC environment. If a Marine wears the field protective mask, its bulk and reduced visibility can affect his firing position which in turn affects the...

Cover and Concealment

In a combat environment, a Marine must be prepared to fire from any type of cover or concealment. Cover is anything that protects a Marine from enemy fire. Cover may be an existing hole, a hastily dug shelter, or a well-prepared fighting position with overhead protection. Concealment is anything that hides a Marine from enemy view, but it may not afford protection. Concealment can be obtained from buildings, trees, crops, and skillful use of ground contours. A Marine can use any object or...

Cocked Leg Prone Position with the Hasty Sling

Apply the seven factors to this position para. 5003 . To assume the cocked leg prone position with the hasty sling, either move forward or drop back into position see figs. 5-27, 5-28, and 5-29 l Once on the ground, roll the body to the left side. The left leg is stretched out behind you, almost in a straight line. This allows the mass of the body to be placed behind the rifle to aid in absorbing recoil. l Turn the toe of the left foot inboard so the outside of the left leg and foot are in...

Sitting to Kneeling

After searching and assessing at the sitting position, move to a kneeling position by performing the following steps i Maintain control of the rifle with the rifle butt in the pocket of the shoulder. i Uncross the legs to an open leg position. i Tuck the right foot underneath the left thigh, as close to the buttocks as possible see fig. 7-11 . i Lean forward and to the right and roll on to the right knee to a kneeling position and search and assess see fig. 7-12 . It may be necessary to release...

Windage Adjustments

After identifying wind direction, wind classification, and wind velocity, windage adjustments needed to enable the bullet to strike the target are estimated in the following ways Observation Method. Using the windage chart provided in figure 8-4, match the wind velocity, wind direction, and range to the target to the information in the chart to estimate the correct number of clicks to apply to the windage knob. Flag Method. Using the windage chart provided in figure 8-5, match the wind...

Medium Kneeling Position

This is also referred to as the bootless kneeling position. Assume the medium kneeling position in the same way as the high kneeling position with the ex ception of the right foot. The right ankle is straight and the foot is stretched out with the bootlaces in contact with the ground. The buttocks are in contact with the heel of the right foot. See figure 5-56. The low kneeling position is most commonly used when firing from a forward slope. Assume the low kneeling position in the same way as...

User Serviceability Inspection

Individual Marines must perform user serviceability inspections on their weapons before firing them. This inspection ensures the weapon is in an acceptable operating condition. l Place rifle in Condition 4 see para. 3002 . l Conduct a function check. l Check the rifle to ensure the following l Compensator is tight. l Barrel is tight. l Front sight post is straight. l Front sight post is adjustable. l Handguards are serviceable. l Rear sight elevation and windage knobs are adjustable and have...

Eye Relief

Eye relief is the distance between the rear sight aperture and the aiming eye. See figure 4-6. Normal eye relief is two to six inches from the rear sight aperture. The distance between the aiming eye and the rear sight aperture depends on the size of the Marine and the firing position. While eye relief varies slightly from one position to another, it is important to have the same eye relief for all shots fired from a particular position. Figure 4-4. Importance of Correct Sight Alignment. If the...

Hasty Sling Application

The hasty sling is used in all firing positions. The hasty sling is advantageous in combat because it can be acquired quickly and it provides added stability to the rifle. The same sling setting can be used for all firing positions. If properly adjusted, the hasty sling supports the weight of the weapon, provides stability for the rifle, and reduces the effects of the rifle's recoil. When using the hasty sling, controlled muscle tension is applied to offer resistance against the sling, enabling...

Presenting the Rifle From the Tactical Carry

The Marine uses the Tactical Carry when no immediate threat is present. This carry permits the rifle to be easily carried for long periods of time, but it does not permit the quickest presentation to a target. If the situation changes and a target presents itself, a Marine performs the following steps to present the rifle from the Tactical Carry once a target appears i Extend the rifle toward the target keeping the muzzle slightly up so the buttstock clears all personal equipment. Continue to...

Interrupted Trigger Control

Interrupted trigger control is used at any time the sight alignment is interrupted or the target is temporarily obscured. An example of this is extremely windy conditions when the weapon will not settle, forcing the Marine to pause until the sights return to his aiming point. To perform interrupted trigger control i Move the trigger to the rear until an error is detected in the aiming process. i When this occurs, stop the rearward motion on the trigger, but maintain the pressure on the trigger,...

Procedures for Unload and Show Clear

On the command Unload and Show Clear, the Marine will perform the following steps to take the rifle from any condition to Condition 4 l With a straight trigger finger, point the rifle in the clearing barrel. l Ensure the weapon is on safe. l Remove the magazine from the rifle and retain it on your person. l While cupping the left hand under the ejection port, rotate the weapon until the ejection port is facing down. l Pull the charging handle to the rear and catch the round in the left hand. l...

Hasty Sling

In a hasty sling configuration, the sling is attached to the upper and lower sling swivels of the rifle. When the left arm is placed in the hasty sling, tension created by the sling travels from side to side. The tension created by the sling affects how the position is established. There are fundamental differences between the application of the seven factors when using the hasty sling. The most obvious of these is placement of the left hand and the left elbow. To maximize the support provided...

Tactical Carry

A Marine carries the rifle at the tactical carry if no immediate threat is present. The tactical carry permits control of the rifle while a Marine is moving, yet it still allows quick engagement of the enemy. A Marine performs the following steps to assume the tactical carry l Place left hand on the handguards, right hand around the pistol grip, trigger finger straight along the receiver see fig. 3-17 , and right thumb on top of the selector lever see fig. 3-18 . l Place the buttstock along the...

Make a Sight Adjustment if Required

If the shots form a group, make the necessary sight adjustments off of the center of the group. If shots do not form a group and do not just contain a poor shot, do not make a sight adjustment. Determine the sight adjustment by locating the center of the shot group and using the grid lines on the target in the data book. These grid lines represent the number of inches to bring a shot group center. Looking at the shot group Figure A-3. Recording Rapid Fire...

Point of Aim Technique

Moving Target Aiming Points

Predetermined points of aim sector the target vertically. The tip of the front sight post centered on the leading edge of the target is considered one point of aim the trailing edge of the front sight post held on the leading edge of the target is considered two points of aim. The same units of measure are applied off the target for holds of additional points of aim. These points of aim are used to compensate when a lead is required to engage a moving target. The following guidelines apply if a...

Acquiring and Maintaining Sight Alignment and Sight Picture

Rifle Shooting Stock Weld Picture

The human eye can focus clearly on only one object at a time. For accurate shooting, it is important to focus on the tip of the front sight post. When the shot is fired, focus must be on the tip of the front sight post peripheral vision will include the rear sight and the target. The rear sight and the target will appear blurry. Staring or fixing the vision on the front sight post for longer than a few seconds can distort the image, making it difficult to detect minute errors in sight...

Stock Weld

The placement of the shooter's cheek against the stock should remain firm and consistent from shot to shot. Consistency of stock weld is achieved through proper placement of the rifle butt in the pocket of the shoulder. A firm contact between the cheek and the stock enables consistent eye relief and enables the head and rifle to recoil as a single unit. Stock weld provides quick recovery between rapid fire shots, keeps the aiming eye centered in the rear sight aperture, and prevents the head...

Battlesight Zero

Rifle Grenade Bullet Trap

Zeroing is conducted at a range of 300 yards meters. If a 300-yard -meter range is not available, a field expedient BZO can be established at a reduced range of 36 yards 30 meters. When a rifle is zeroed for 300 yards meters, the bullet crosses the line of sight twice. It first crosses the line of sight on its upward path of trajectory at 36 yards 30 meters, and again farther down range at 300 yards meters see fig. 9-13 . Therefore a rifle's BZO may be established at a distance of 36 yards 30...

Open Leg Sitting Position with the Loop Sling

Apply the three elements and seven factors to this position para. 5004 . To assume the open leg sitting position with the loop sling see figs. 5-47, 5-48, and 5-49 on page 5-16 l Position the body at approximately a 30-degree angle to the target. l Place the feet approximately shoulder width apart. l Place the left hand under the handguard. l Bend at the knees while breaking the fall with the right hand. l Push backward with the feet to extend the legs and place the buttocks on the ground. l...

Elements of a Good Shooting Position

There are three elements of a good shooting position that apply when using a loop sling bone support, muscular relaxation, and natural point of aim. The three elements of a shooting position applied with the loop sling do not apply in the same way as when firing with a hasty sling. While some degree of bone support is still achieved with the hasty sling, muscular tension is applied rather than muscular relaxation. Natural point of aim, however, applies to both the loop sling and the hasty...

Temperature

Wind Chart Sniper

Extreme changes in temperature cause fluctuation in the rifle's chamber pressure. This fluctuation is caused by changes in the propellant's temperature. In cold weather, as rifle chamber pressure decreases, the bullet exits the muzzle at a lower velocity, and the bullet impacts the target below the point of aim. In extreme heat, the rifle's chamber pressure increases causing the bullet to exit the muzzle at a higher velocity and impact the target above the point of aim. Hot air is less dense...

Firing From the Right or Left Side of Cover

To minimize exposure and maximize the cover's protection, a right-handed Marine should fire from the right side of cover and a left-handed Marine should fire from the left side, if possible see fig. 6-11 . Figure 6-12. Firing from the Left Side of Cover. If, however, a right-handed Marine must fire from the left side of cover, he fires right-handed but adjusts his position behind cover and uses the rollout technique see para. 6003 to engage the target. See figure 6-12. Figure 6-12. Firing from...

Weapons Transports

Strong Side Sling Arms

Weapons transports are used to carry the rifle over the back or shoulders when moving for long periods they provide a more relaxed position for walking. Weapons transports are used if no immediate threat is present. They are also used whenever one or both hands are needed for other work. Strong Side Sling Arms Transport Muzzle Up To assume the strong side sling arms muzzle up transport from the tactical carry, a Marine performs the following steps see fig. 3-22 pistol grip. l Lower the...

Rifle Front Sight Post Method

What Rifle Post Site

The area of the target covered by the rifle's front sight post can be used to estimate range to a target. A Marine notes the appearance of the front sight post on a known-distance target. A Marine then uses this as a guide to determine range over an unknown distance. Because the apparent size of the target changes as the distance to the target changes, the amount of the target covered by the front sight post varies based on the range. In addition, a Marine's eye relief and perception of the...

Donning the Hasty Sling

Marine With Hasty Sling

A Marine performs the following steps to form a hasty sling i Hold the rifle vertical with the barrel pointing upward. l Unhook the J-hook from the lower sling swivel. l Loosen the sling keeper. l Adjust the sling until the J-hook hangs below the rifle butt. The distance will vary based on the individual Marine, but the J-hook will usually hang approximately 3 to 10 inches below the rifle butt. Secure the sling keeper. See figure 5-1. l Turn the sling a half turn outboard to allow the sling to...

Crossed Ankle Sitting Position with the Hasty Sling

The crossed ankle sitting position is an extremely stable shooting position. This position places most of the body's weight behind the weapon and aids in quick shot recovery. Apply the seven factors to this position para. 5003 . To assume the crossed ankle sitting position with the hasty sling see figs. 5-33, 5-34, 5-35 l Square the body to the target. l Grasp the handguard with the left hand. l Bend at knees and break the fall with the right hand. l Push backward with the feet to extend the...

Standing Position with the Hasty Sling

Low Kneeling With The Hasty Sling

Apply the seven factors to this position para. 5003 . To assume the standing position with the hasty sling see figs. 5-58, 5-59, and 5-60 l Square the body to the target. l Spread the feet apart to a comfortable distance with the left foot slightly in front of the right foot. This distance may be wider than shoulder width. l Distribute the weight evenly over both feet and hips. Balance will shift forward slightly to reduce recovery time and increase the stability of the hold. The legs should be...

High Kneeling Position with the Hasty Sling

Low Kneeling With The Hasty Sling

Apply the seven factors to this position para. 5003 . To assume the high kneeling position with the hasty sling, either move forward or drop back into position see figs. 5-50, 5-51, and 5-52 l Square the body to the target. l Keep the right ankle straight, with the toe of the boot in contact with the ground and curled under by the weight of the body. l Place the right portion of the buttocks on or over the right heel. Contact with the heel provides more stability to the position, however, it is...

Crossed Leg Sitting Position with the Loop Sling

Apply the three elements and seven factors to this position para. 5004 . To assume crossed leg sitting position with loop sling see figs. 5-41, 5-42, and 5-43 l Position body at a 45- to 60-degree angle to target. l Place the left hand under the handguard. l Cross the left leg over the right leg. l Bend at the knees while breaking the fall with the right hand. l Place the buttocks on the ground as close to the crossed legs as you comfortably can. l Bend forward at the waist while placing the...

Straight Leg Prone Position with the Loop Sling

Apply the three elements and seven factors to this position para. 5004 . To assume straight leg prone position with the loop sling, either move forward or drop back into position see figs. 5-24, 5-25, and 5-26 l Once on the ground, roll the body to the left side as you extend and invert the left elbow on the ground. Stretch your legs out behind you. Spread the feet a comfortable distance apart with the toes pointing outboard and the inner portion of the feet in contact with the ground. l As...

High Kneeling Position with the Loop Sling

Apply the three elements and seven factors to this position para. 5004 . To assume the high kneeling position with the loop sling, either move forward or drop back into position see figs. 5-53, 5-54, and 5-55 l Position the body at a 45-degree angle to the target. l Place the left hand under the handguard. l Kneel down on right knee so right lower leg is approximately parallel to the target 45 to 90 degrees . l Keep the right ankle straight, with the toe of the boot in contact with the ground...

Offcenter Vision

Off-center vision is the technique of keeping the attention focused on an object without looking directly at it see fig. 10-10 . To search for targets using off-center vision, never look directly at the object you are observing. You will see the object much better by using off-center vision. Look slightly to the left, right, above or below the object. Experiment and practice to find the best off-center angle for you. For most people, it is about 6 to 10 degrees away from the object, or about a...

Alert Carry

Marine Rifle Alert Carry

A Marine carries the rifle at the alert if enemy contact is likely. The alert is also used for moving in close terrain e.g., urban, jungle . A Marine can engage the enemy faster from the alert than from the tactical carry. However, the alert is more tiring than the tactical carry and its use can be physically demanding. A Marine performs the following steps to assume the alert l Place the left hand on the handguards, the right hand around the pistol grip, the trigger finger straight along the...

The Tracking Method

The tracking method is used for a target that is moving at a steady pace over a well-determined route. If a Marine uses the tracking method, he tracks the target with the rifle's front sight post while maintaining sight alignment and a point of aim on or ahead of leading the target until the shot is fired. When establishing a lead on a moving target, rifle sights will not be centered on the target and instead will be held on a lead in front of the target. See figure 10-8. A Marine performs the...

Obtaining Night Vision

There are two methods used to obtain night vision. The first method is to remain in an area of darkness for about 30 minutes. This area can be indoors or outdoors. The major disadvantage of this approach is that an individual is not able to perform any tasks while acquiring night vision in total darkness. The second method is to remain in a darkened area under low intensity red light similar to the light used in a photographer's darkroom for about 20 minutes, followed by about 10 minutes in...

Standing Position with the Parade Sling

Stock Weld

The parade sling is used to emphasize marksmanship fundamentals while firing from the standing position on KD courses during entry-level training. To achieve proper positioning of the parade sling, perform the following steps l Attach sling to rifle by placing feed end of sling down through the upper sling swivel. l Place feed end of sling through sling keeper and lock into place. l Attach J-hook to lower sling swivel. l Pull feed end of sling through sling keeper until sling is taut. l Move...

Open Leg Sitting Position with the Hasty Sling

Rifle Butt The Shoulder

The open leg sitting position provides a medium base of support and is most commonly used when firing from a forward slope. Apply the seven factors to this position para. 5003 . To assume the open leg sitting position with the hasty sling see figs. 5-44, 5-45, and 5-46 l Square the body to the target. l Place the feet approximately shoulder width apart. l Grasp the handguard with the left hand. l Bend at the knees while breaking the fall with the right hand. l Push backward with the feet to...

Straight Leg Prone Position with the Hasty Sling

Straight Leg Prone

Apply the seven factors to this position para. 5003 . To assume the straight leg prone position with the hasty sling, either move forward or drop back into position see figs. 5-21, 5-22, and 5-23 i Once on the ground, extend your left elbow in front of you. Stretch your legs out behind you. Spread the feet a comfortable distance apart with the toes pointing outboard and the inner portion of the feet in contact with the ground. As much of the body mass should be aligned directly behind the rifle...

Presenting the Rifle From the Alert Carry and From the Ready Carry

The Marine uses the Alert Carry when enemy contact is likely. The Alert is also used for moving in close terrain e.g., urban, jungle . The Marine uses the Ready Carry when enemy contact is imminent. To present the rifle from the Alert and from the Ready, a Marine performs the following steps once a target appears i While looking at the target, bring the muzzle up by raising the left hand, allowing the rifle butt to pivot in the shoulder. At the same time, pull the rifle firmly into the pocket...

Weak Side Sling Arms Transport Muzzle Down

Cross Body Sling Arms

The weak side sling arms muzzle down transport can be used in inclement weather to keep moisture out of the rifle's bore. To assume this transport from the tactical carry, a Marine performs the following steps see fig. 3-23 pistol grip. l With the left hand, rotate muzzle down and bring the rifle to a vertical position on the left side of the body. The pistol grip is pointed outboard. l With right hand, place sling on left shoulder. l Grasp sling above the waist with the left hand. l With the...

Donning the Loop Sling

L Place the rifle butt on the right hip and cradle the rifle in the right arm. l Disconnect the J-hook from the lower sling swivel. l With the M-buckle near the hook, feed the sling through the top of the M-buckle to form a loop large enough to slip over the arm. See figure 5-6. l Give the loop a half turn outboard and insert the left arm through the loop, positioning the loop above the biceps. The loop is high on the left arm above the biceps muscle in such a position that it does not transmit...

Presenting the Rifle From the Strong Side Sling Arms Transport

M16 Strong Side Sling Arms

Once a target appears, a Marine performs the following to present the rifle from Strong Side Sling Arms While looking at the target, lean forward slightly to facilitate removal of the rifle from the shoulder. Reach under the right arm with the left hand between the sling and the body and grasp the handguards. See figure 7-4 . At the same time, pull down on the sling and raise right elbow out and parallel to the deck. Roll the right shoulder forward and release the sling from the right hand once...

Bone Support

The body's skeletal structure provides a stable foundation to support the rifle's weight. A weak shooting position will not withstand a rifle's repeated recoil when firing at the sustained rate or buffeting from wind. To attain a correct shooting position, the body's bones must support as much of the rifle's weight as possible. Proper use of the sling provides additional support. The weight of the weapon should be supported by bone rather than muscle because muscles fatigue whereas bones do...

Natural Point of

The point at which the rifle sights settle when in a firing position is called the natural point of aim. Since the rifle becomes an extension of the body, it may be necessary to adjust the position of the body until the rifle sights settle naturally on the desired aiming point on the target. When in a shooting position with proper sight alignment, the position of the tip of the front sight post will indicate the natural point of aim. When completely relaxed, the tip of the front sight post...

Dry Reload

A dry reload is required when the magazine in the weapon has been emptied and the bolt has locked to the rear. To perform a dry reload l Press the magazine release button. l Remove the empty magazine and retain it on your person when time permits. l Fully insert a filled magazine into the magazine well and tug downward on the magazine to ensure it is properly seated. l Depress the bolt catch to allow the bolt carrier to move forward and observe the round being chambered. This places the rifle...

Audible Pop or Reduced Recoil

An audible pop occurs when only a portion of the propellant is ignited. It is normally identifiable by reduced recoil and is sometimes accompanied by excessive smoke escaping from the chamber area. To clear the rifle in a combat environment Place the rifle in Condition 4. Move take down pin from left to right as far as it will go to allow the lower receiver to pivot. Remove the bolt carrier group. Inspect the bore for an obstruction from the chamber end. Insert a cleaning rod into the bore from...