Ruger Super Blackhawk .38-.40

LEAD EXPOSURE

Discharging firearms in poorly ventilated areas, cleaning firearms, or handling ammunition may result in exposure to lead and other substances known to the slate of California to cause birth defects, reproductive harm, and other serious physical injury. Have adequate ventilation at all times. Wash hands thoroughly after exposure.

SHOOTING OR CLEANING GUNS MAY EXPOSE YOU TO LEAD

Notes on Cartridges listed in the table above: .357 Mag is 357 Magnum. .38 SPL is .38 Special. 9 mm is 9 mm Parabellum, also wiled 9mm Luger. .45 Colt is also called .45 Long Colt .45 Auto, is .45 Automatic and is also called .45 ACP. .44 Mag is .44 Magnum. .44 SPL is .44 Special.

Notes on the .32-20/.32 Magnum Convertible: The .32-20/.32 magnum revolver is supplied with one .32-20 cylinder and one .32 II&R magnum cylinder. The .32-20 cylinder can fire all .32-20 factory loaded cartridges, both regular and high speed. No other .32 caliber cartridge should be used in this cylinder, as split cases can result in hot powder gasses escaping rearward under very high velocity. The .32 H&R Magnum cylinder can fire all factory loaded .32 S&W and .32 S&W long cartridges. The use of other than .32 H&R Magnum cartridges may, in some loadings, result in unsatisfactory accuracy.

Notes on the .38-40/10mm Blackhawk Convertible: Ruger New Model Convertible revolvers using the cylinder chambered for the .38-40 cartridge can use all factory loadings of this ammunition both regular and high speed. Do not use any other ammunition in the .38-40 cylinder. Revolvers using the cylinder chambered for the 10 mm pistol cartridge can use all factory loadings of this ammunition both regular and high speed. Do not use any other ammunition in the 10 mm cylinder.

Notes on the .44-40/44 mag Super Blackhawk Convertible: Ruger New Model Super Blackhawk convertible revolvers using the cylinder chambered for the .44 40 cartridge can use all factory loadings of this ammunition both regular and high speed. Do not use any other ammunition in the .44-40 cylinder. The .44 mag. cylinder can use all factory loadings of the .44 magnum cartridges and .44 special cartridges.

Notes on Revolvers Chambered for 9 mm or .30 Carbine: Because 9 mm cartridges are manufactured worldwide for use in pistols, revolvers, and submachine guns, it is possible to encounter cartridges which, when fired, develop pierced primers. If this occurs, discontinue the use of the particular brand or type of ammunition. The possibility of a pierced primer is another compelling reason why a shooter should always wear protective glasses to shield his eyes. Use only metal jacketed bullets in 9 mm and .30 Carbine revolvers. When a lead bullet is fired, its base expands and a ring of lead is shaved off and deposited in the shoulder area of the chamber. A build-up of lead rings can prevent proper chambering of cartridges because 9 mm and .30 Carbine cartridge mouths seat on the chamber shoulders.

When firing a regular .30 Carbine cartridge with a metal jacketed bullet, a ring of brass is sometimes clipped from the mouth of the cartridge case. This ring can lodge in the chamber shoulder and prevent full chambering of a subsequent cartridge. For the reasons noted above, revolver chambers should be cleaned regularly and chamber cleaning should be the first corrective action when cartridges do not chamber properly.

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