General Information And Mechanical Characteristics

The mechanisms of the RUGER® NEW MODEL BLACKHAWK® differ significantly from that of any other single action revolver. The information and instructions which follow apply only to the New Model Blackhawk* revolver.

The RUGER® NEW MODEL BISLEY revolver has many of the features of the New Model Blackhawk revolvers with certain important differences, such as the hammer, trigger and grip frame. The RUGER® NEW MODEL HUNTER is a .44 magnum single action revolver designed especially for the handgun hunter. A heavier, solid ribbed barrel cut for the patented Ruger scope mounting system distinguishes this model.

*In this manual the words NEW MODEL BLACKHAWK® refer to the NEW MODEL BLACKHAWK®, NEW MODEL SUPER BLACKHAWK® and RUGER BISLEY revolvers which all utilize the same Ruger New Model Blackhawk mechanism.

The patented Ruger New Model single action revolver mechanism incorporates a transfer bar. The transfer bar - which is raised into firing position as the trigger is pulled to the rear - transmits the energy of the hammer blow to the firing pin. This transfer bar mechanism makes a "safety" notch unnecessary.

The gate (loading gate) can be opened only when the hammer and trigger are fully forward. Opening the gate immobilizes the trigger, hammer, and transfer bar. When the gate is opened the cylinder is unlatched and can be turned for loading or ejection. When the gate is closed, the cylinder latch functions in the normal manner. The loading notch is therefore unnecessary in the New Model design.

Unlike the earlier single action revolvers which have four hammer positions -"cocked," "loading," "safety" and "all the way forward" - the New Model has only two hammer positions - "cocked" and "all the way forward."

IMPORTANT SAFETY NOTE

OWNERS OF ALL "OLD MODEL" (PRE-1973) RUGER SINGLE ACTION REVOLVERS, INCLUDING BEARCATS WITH SERIAL NUMBERS BELOW 93-00000, SHOULD WRITE FOR DETAILS CONCERNING OUR FREE SAFETY CONVERSION, WHICH CAN HELP PREVENT ACCIDENTS CAUSED BY A BLOW TO THE HAMMER IF THE USER HAS FAILED TO TAKE THE BASIC SAFETY PRECAUTION OF KEEPING AN EMPTY CHAMBER UNDER THE HAMMER. See Page 29.

NOMENCLATURE

New Model Blackhawk*

Ruger Security Six Nomenclature
Parts referred to frequently are indicated by arrows.

NOMENCLATURE

Ruger Bearcat Cal Seis Tiros

A CAUTION-NUMBERED CYLINDERS

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Do not accept delivery of a New Model Blackhawk Convertible (a model with two cylinders) unless the numbers on the front face of both cylinders match the last three digits of the serial number on the frame. Use of the wrong cylinder can cause improper alignment or timing and may result in personal injury.

A Blackhawk revolver (including the Super Blackhawk & Bisley) manufactured with a single cylinder does not have the last three digits of the serial number marked on the cylinder.

CYLINDERS MUST MATCH GUN

The mechanism of the RUGER® NEW MODEL BLACKHAWK® &

BISLEY provides maximum security against accidental discharge. As with any other firearm, however, the New Model must be used with strict attention to correct safety practices. In addition, the revolver should be inspected frequently to assure that it is working properly.

The Ruger New Model revolver mechanism is illustrated below. The same basic mechanism is found in the entire line of Ruger New Model single action revolvers - Single-Six, Blackhawk, Super Blackhawk, Bisley, Vaquero, Bisley Vaquero, and Hunter Models.

Single Action Mechanism

Mechanism shown at rest. Transfer bar is not in line between hammer and firing pin. This is the carrying position.

Trigger Transfer Bar

Mechanism shown with trigger pulled and hammer beginning to fall. Transfer bar is in firing position, between hammer and firing pin.

A WARNING - LEAD EXPOSURE

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Discharging firearms in poorly ventilated areas, cleaning firearms, or handling ammunition may result in exposure to lead and other substances known to the state of California to cause birth defects, reproductive harm, and other serious physical injury. Have adequate ventilation at all times. Wash hands thoroughly after exposure.

SHOOTING OR CLEANING GUNS MAY EXPOSE YOU TO LEAD

AMMUNITION

The table below shows the correct type of ammunition for use in each of the revolvers listed. Where two cartridges are shown on the same line, they may be used interchangeably.

Model

Caliber

Ammunition

Blackhawk Convertible

(no longer in production)

.32 H&R & .32 S&W in Extra Cyl.

Blackhawk, Bisley

.357 Magnum

.357 Mag. and .38 SPL

Blackhawk Convertible

.357 Mag/9mm

.357 Mag. and .38 SPL 9mm in Extra Cyl.

Blackhawk

.30 Carbine

.30 Carbine

Blackhawk

.41 Magnum

.41 Magnum

Blackhawk, Bisley

.45 Colt

.45 Colt

Blackhawk Convertible

.45 Colt/45 Auto

.45 Colt; .45 Auto in Extra Cyl.

Super Blackhawk, Hunter, Blackhawk, Bisley

.44 Magnum

.44 Mag. and .44 SPL

(no longer in production)

.38-40 reg. & high speed 10mm in Extra Cyl.

Super Blackhawk Convertible

(no longer in production)

.44-40 reg. & high speed .44 Mag. & .44 SPL in Extra Cyl.

AMMUNITION (CARTRIDGES) NOTICE

WE SPECIFICALLY DISCLAIM RESPONSIBILITY FOR ANY DAMAGE OR INJURY WHATSOEVER OCCURRING IN CONNECTION WITH, OR AS THE RESULT OF, THE USE IN RUGER REVOLVERS OF FAULTY, OR NONSTANDARD, OR "REMANUFACTURED" OR HANDLOADED (RELOADED) AMMUNITION, OR OF CARTRIDGES OTHER THAN THOSE FOR WHICH THE FIREARM WAS ORIGINALLY CHAMBERED.

A WARNING-AMMUNITION

Death, serious injury, and damage can result from the use of wrong ammunition, bore obstructions, powder overloads, or incorrect cartridge components. Always wear shooting glasses and hearing protectors.

IMPROPER AMMUNITION DESTROYS GUNS

Notes on Cartridges listed in the table above: .357 Mag. is 357 Magnum; .38 SPL is .38 Special; 9mm is 9mm Parabellum, also called 9mm Luger; .45 Colt is also called .45 Long Colt; .45 Auto is .45 Automatic and is also called .45 ACP; .44 Mag. is .44 Magnum; .44 SPL is .44 Special.

Notes on the .32-20/.32 Magnum Convertible (this model is no longer in production): The .32-20/.32 magnum revolver is supplied with one .32-20 cylinder and one .32 H&R magnum cylinder. The .32-20 cylinder can fire all .32-20 factory loaded cartridges, both regular and high speed. No other .32 caliber cartridge should be used in this cylinder, as split cases can result in hot powder gasses escaping rearward under very high velocity. The .32 H&R Magnum cylinder can fire all factory loaded .32 S&W and .32 S&W long cartridges. The use of other than .32 H&R Magnum cartridges may, in some loadings, result in unsatisfactory accuracy.

Notes on the .38-40/10mm Blackhawk Convertible (this model is no longer in production): Ruger New Model Convertible revolvers using the cylinder chambered for the .38-40 cartridge can use all factory loadings of this ammunition both regular and high speed. Do not use any other ammunition in the .38-40 cylinder. Revolvers using the cylinder chambered for the 10mm pistol cartridge can use all factory loadings of this ammunition both regular and high speed. Do not use any other ammunition in the 10mm cylinder.

Notes on the .44-40/44 Mag. Super Blackhawk Convertible (this model no longer in production): Ruger New Model Super Blackhawk convertible revolvers using the cylinder chambered for the .44-40 cartridge can use all factory loadings of this ammunition both regular and high speed. Do not use any other ammunition in the .44-40 cylinder. The .44 magnum cylinder can use all factory loadings of the .44 magnum cartridges and .44 special cartridges.

Notes on Revolvers Chambered for 9mm or .30 Carbine: Because 9mm cartridges are manufactured worldwide for use in pistols, revolvers, and submachine guns, it is possible to encounter cartridges which, when fired, develop pierced primers. If this occurs, discontinue the use of the particular brand or type of ammunition. The possibility of a pierced primer is another compelling reason why a shooter should always wear protective glasses to shield his eyes. Use only metal jacketed bullets in 9mm and .30 Carbine revolvers. When a lead bullet is fired, its base expands and a ring of lead is shaved off and deposited in the shoulder area of the chamber. A build-up of lead rings can prevent proper chambering of cartridges because 9mm and .30 Carbine cartridge mouths seat on the chamber shoulders.

When firing a regular .30 Carbine cartridge with a metal jacketed bullet, a ring of brass is sometimes clipped from the mouth of the cartridge case. This ring can lodge in the chamber shoulder and prevent full chambering of a subsequent cartridge. For the reasons noted above, revolver chambers should be cleaned regularly and chamber cleaning should be the first corrective action when cartridges do not chamber properly.

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Responses

  • verdiana
    What is transfer bar safety on tigers?
    8 years ago
  • Blanco
    Which Blackhawks have hammer safeties?
    8 years ago
  • hagos
    Did not update old model blackhawk?
    8 years ago
  • FIKRU
    How to disassemble a ruger new model blackhawk?
    8 years ago
  • VINICIO COLOMBO
    What is the transfer bar in a revolver?
    3 years ago

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