Aiming procedures

3-2. Aiming procedures include placing the eye correctly, obtaining a sight picture, and aligning the sight. Combining these procedures is critical to correctly aiming light antiarmor weapons.

Eye Placement

3-3. Estimate the range before sighting the weapon (Chapter 7). Place your firing eye between 2 1/2 to 3 inches from the rear sight. This distance is necessary for correct sight alignment and to prevent injury to the firer from the weapon's recoil (Figure 3-2).

2 1/2 TO 3 INCHES

2 1/2 TO 3 INCHES

Figure 3-2. Eye placement.

WARNING

When firing the M136 AT4, do not place your eye closer than 2 1/2 inches from the rear sight. The M136 AT4's recoil could cause the rear sight to injure your firing eye.

Sight Alignment

3-4. Align the sights correctly with the target. Position the rear sight so that the white semicircle of the front sight is a hazy line around the bottom half of the rear sight opening. Position the front sight posts on the target (Figure 3-3). Align the sight by moving your head forward or backward.

Figure 3-3. Sight alignment for the M136 AT4.

Sight Picture

3-5. Position the front sight on the target. Stationary Targets

3-6. Stationary targets include fixed positions and fortifications as well as vehicles moving directly toward or away from the firer. Adjust the rear sight for the correct range and place the center sight post in the center of the target (Figure 3-4).

Figure 3-4. Sight picture, stationary targets.

Slow-moving Vehicles

3-7. Slow-moving vehicles are those with an estimated speed of 10 miles per hour or less or those moving in an oblique direction. Place the center sight post on the front or leading edge of the vehicle (Figure 3-5, page 3-4).

Figure 3-5. Sight picture, slow-moving targets.

Fast-moving Vehicles

3-8. Fast-moving vehicles are those estimated to be moving faster than 10 miles per hour. Place either the left or right lead post on the center of the target. For example, if the target is moving from left to right, place the left lead post on the target's center of mass, and vice versa (Figure 3-6).

Figure 3-6. Sight picture, fast-moving targets.

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