Warning Manual Safety

Keep the safety "ON" unless actually firing. Always move the safety to its intended position and check it. The safety is not "ON" unless it is completely "ON." Never depend on a safety mechanism or any other mechanical device to justify careless handling or permitting the rifle to point in an unsafe direction. The only "safe" rifle is one in which the bolt is open, the chamber is empty, and there is no magazine in the gun.

KNOW HOW TO USE THE SAFETY

Semiautomatic Safety CatchGun Bolt Lock Mechanism

Bolt Catch Lever

The SIG 556 rifle is equipped with a bolt catch lever. The purpose of the bolt catch lever is two-fold. The bolt catch may be manually engaged with the bolt pulled to the rear (open position). This action locks the bolt open, allowing an unobstructed view of the chamber area. During firing, with a magazine inserted, the bolt catch will lock the bolt open after the last round in the magazine has been expended, giving a visual indication the magazine is empty and allowing the shooter to visually check that the chamber is clear. The bolt is engaged by the bolt catch lever when the bolt catch lever is pushed upward by the magazine follower during the cycle of operation. The bolt can be manually released (closed) by either depressing the bolt catch lever or by pulling rearward on the charging handle and releasing.

Manual Fusil Sig 556

CAUTION: Dropping or jarring the rifle with the bolt locked open can cause the bolt catch lever to disengage. If a magazine, loaded with ammunition, is inserted in the rifle when this occurs, a round will chamber with the potential for an unintentional discharge. ALWAYS handle the rifle as if loaded whenever a magazine is inserted in the rifle. ALWAYS place the safety lever in the "S" (SAFE) position and unload the rifle whenever shooting is complete.

AMMUNITION

1. Use only high quality, original, factory-manufactured ammunition. Do not use cartridges that are dirty, wet, corroded, bent, or damaged. Do not oil cartridges. Do not spray aerosol-type lubricants, preservatives, or cleaners directly onto cartridges or where excess spray may flow into contact with cartridges. Lubricant or other foreign matter on cartridges can cause potentially dangerous ammunition malfunctions. Use only ammunition of the caliber for which your firearm is chambered. The proper caliber is permanently engraved on your firearm; never attempt to use ammunition of any other caliber.

2. The use of reloaded, "remanufactured" hand-loaded, or other non-standard ammunition voids all warranties. Reloading is a science and improperly loaded ammunition can be extremely dangerous. Severe damage to the firearm and serious injury to the shooter or to others may result. Always use ammunition that complies with the industry performance standards established by the Sporting Arms and Ammunition Manufacturers' Institute, Inc. of the United States (SAAMI) or ammunition manufactured to military specifications.

AMMUNITION (CARTRIDGE) NOTICE

SIGARMS, INC. SPECIFICALLY DISCLAIMS RESPONSIBILITY FOR ANY DAMAGE OR INJURY WHATSOEVER OCCURRING IN CONNECTION WITH, OR AS A RESULT OF, THE USE IN ANY SIGARMS FIREARM OF FAULTY, NON-STANDARD, "REMANUFACTURED" HAND LOADED (RELOADED) AMMUNITION, OR CARTRIDGES OTHER THAN THOSE FOR WHICH THE FIREARM WAS ORIGINALLY CHAMBERED.

3. Firearms may be severely damaged and serious injury to the shooter or to others may result from any condition causing excessive pressure inside the chamber or barrel during firing. Excessive pressure can be caused by obstructions in the barrel, propellant powder overloads, the use of incorrect cartridges or defectively assembled cartridges. In addition, the use of a dirty, corroded, or damaged cartridge can lead to a burst cartridge case and consequent damage to the firearm and personal injury from the sudden escape of high-pressure propellant gas within the firearm's mechanism.

4. Immediately stop shooting and check the barrel for a possible obstruction whenever:

• You have difficulty in, or feel unusual resistance in, chambering a cartridge;

• The mechanism fails to extract a fired cartridge case;

• Unburned grains of propellant powder are discovered spilled in the mechanism;

• A shot sounds weak or abnormal. In such cases it is possi ble that a bullet is lodged part way down the barrel. Firing a subsequent bullet into the obstructed barrel can wreck the firearm and cause serious injury to the shooter or to bystanders.

5. Bullets can become lodged in the barrel:

• If the cartridge has been improperly loaded without pro pellant powder, or if the powder fails to ignite (ignition of the cartridge primer alone will push the bullet out of the cartridge case, but usually does not generate sufficient energy to expel the bullet completely from the barrel);

• If the bullet is not properly seated in the cartridge case. When such a cartridge is extracted from the chamber without being fired, the bullet may be left behind in the bore at the point where the rifling begins. Subsequent chambering of another cartridge may push the first bullet further into the bore.

6. If there is any reason to suspect that a bullet is obstructing the barrel, immediately unload the firearm and look through the bore. It is not sufficient to merely look in the chamber. A bullet may be lodged some distance down the barrel where it cannot easily be seen.

IF A BULLET IS IN THE BORE, DO NOT ATTEMPT TO SHOOT IT OUT BY USING ANOTHER CARTRIDGE OR BY BLOWING IT OUT WITH A BLANK OR ONE FROM WHICH THE BULLET HAS BEEN REMOVED. SUCH TECHNIQUES CAN GENERATE EXCESSIVE PRESSURE, WRECK THE FIREARM, AND CAUSE SERIOUS PERSONAL INJURY.

If the bullet can be removed with a cleaning rod, clean any unburned powder grains from the bore, chamber, and mechanism before resuming shooting. If the bullet cannot be dislodged by tapping it with a cleaning rod, take the firearm to a gunsmith.

7. Dirt, corrosion, or other foreign matter on a cartridge can impede complete chambering and may cause the cartridge case to burst upon firing. The same is true of cartridges which are damaged or deformed.

8. Do not oil cartridges, and be sure to wipe the chamber clean of any oil or preservative before commencing to shoot. Oil interferes with the friction between cartridge case and chamber wall that is necessary for safe functioning, and subjects the firearm to stress similar to that imposed by excessive pressure.

9. Use lubricants sparingly on the moving parts of your firearm. Avoid excessive spraying of any aerosol gun care product, especially where it may get on ammunition. All lubricants and aerosol spray lubricants in particular can penetrate cartridge primers and cause misfires. Some highly penetrative lubricants can also migrate inside cartridge cases and cause deterioration of the propellant powder; on firing, the powder may not ignite. If only the primer ignites, there is danger that the bullet may become lodged in the barrel.

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