Info

1 MOA 1" 2"

3"

4"

5"

6"

1/4 MOA 1/4" 1/2"

3/4"

1"

1 1/4"

1 1/2"

yards = 8/4, and 1,000 yards = 10/4. As these old-timer shooters compute the clicks, though, they say it out loud as, "Why, 400 yards, that's four-quarters of an inch, or one full inch," meaning one click will equal an inch of movement. "And 700 yards, that's seven-quarters of an inch, or one and three-quarters movement per click."

My good friend Jim "K-Bar" Kauber, a retired Navy SEAL Master Chief and former Gunsite precision rifle rangemaster, has his own handy formula for determining sight changes at various distances. Let's say you've fired a shot at 300 yards and your spotter reports it hit 15 inches low. Here's Jim's formula for calculating the correction in Minutes of Angle:

Correction (in inches)

Distance (in hundreds of yards)

= MOA correction

Let's try it with the numbers from our example:

15 (inches)

3 (hundreds of yards)

= 5 MOA correction

The lower line of 1/4 MOA equivalents tells you what one click equals for the indicated ranges. To remember it, just recall that it stares as 1/4 inch at 100 yards—which is identical to the 1/4 MOA increments of your scope—then grows by 1/4 inch each 100 yards. It's an easily understood progression, and if you keep it straight in your mind, you'll avoid a lot of confusion later.

What does one click equal at 300 yards? That's easy—3/4 inches. (You remembered the progression: 1/4, 1/2, then 3/4 for 300 yards.)

A faster way used by long-range target shooters is to fractionalize the 1/4 MOA equivalents, so that 100 yards = 1/4, 200 yards = 2/4, 300 yards = 3/4, 400 yards = 4/4, 800

It doesn't matter so much which way you mentally compute MOAs and clicks, but you must have one way and practice it. After a while, you'll find yourself clicking in changes about as quick as your spotter calls your shot.

The solution to the windage compensation, above, is two clicks right. Recall that at 700 yards 1 MOA equals 7 inches, and each 1/4 MOA click will move the strike of the bullet 1 3/4 inches (seven-quarters, according to an old-timer). Two clicks at 1 3/4 inches cach equals 3 1/2 inches, which is as close as you're going to get.

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Hunting Mastery Selected Tips

Hunting Mastery Selected Tips

Deer hunting is an interesting thing that reminds you of those golden old ages of 19th centuries, where a handsome hunk well equipped with all hunting material rides on horse searching for his target animal either for the purpose of displaying his masculine powers or for enticing and wooing his lady love.

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