Trajectory by Yards Expressed in Inches

Spec Ops Shooting

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Zero Range

100

200

300

400

500

600

700

800

900

1000

100 yards

Zero

-3.20

-12.2

-28.3

-53.3

-89.4

-140

-207

-295

-405

200 yards

+1.6

Zero

-7.4

-21.9

-45.3

-79.8

-129

-194

-280

-389

300 yards

+4.0

+4.8

Zero

-12.3

-33.3

-65.4

-112

-175

-259

-365

400 yards

+7.1

+11.0

+9.1

Zero

-17.8

-46.8

-90.2

-150

-231

-339

500 yards

+ 10.6

+18.0

+19.6

+14.1

Zero

-25.8

-65.7

-122

-199

-299

600 yards

+ 14.9

+26.6

+32.5

+31.3

+21.2

Zero

-35.6

-87.7

-160

-256

700 yards

+20.0

+36.8

+47.8

+51.7

+46.7

+30.6

Zero

-46.9

-115

-205

800 yards

+25.8

+48.4

+65.2

+74.9

+75.7

+65.4

+40.7

Zero

-62.4

-147

900 yards

+32.7

+62.2

+85.9

+103

+ 110

+107

+89.0

+54.7

Zero

-77.0

1000 yards

+40.4

+77.6

+109

+ 133

+149

+153

+143

+116

+69.0

Zero

lighter bullets in 40, 55, and 60 grains. These rounds, I think, lend themselves more to entry team operators armed with M4 carbines than snipers.

The .223 family also includes military ball rounds, either the original 55-grain bullet that served in Southeast Asia or, more recently, the 62-grain bullet that offers deeper penetration and improved range. Military tracer, too, can be quite useful in some situations as a day or night signal aid, especially for coordinating with aircraft. (I left the waterproof sealant on the tracer bullet in the accompanying photo so you could see how firmly seated and sealed is a military round. Though this protects from the elements, it unevenly releases the bullet, partially explaining the inaccuracy of some military ammo.)

Finally, I've also depicted Longbow's frangible .223 projectile, which genuinely fires

400 yards, a mere 10 mph wind drifted their bullets 15 inches, while the .308 police snipers on either side of them had their bullets carried only 7.4 inches. That's a big difference.

But a legitimate argument can be made for police snipers using both calibers and fitting their choice to a particular set of circumstances. Some departments are doing this today.

On a pracucal level, however, it must become cumbersome to master two rifles, maintain both with their ammunition, keep them packed in your squad car, then tote both of them to each incident and, like a bag of golf clubs, draw the most compatible rifle for any given shot.

If it's realistic to settle on only one rifle, I'm an advocate of the .308 because it can do everything the .223 can, but deeper, farther, with less wind drift, and with more energy delivered into the target. But I won't be preachy about it since others can honestly and informedly differ with me. And that's why we're including all the data on ,223s—we may disagree, but we don't have to argue about it.

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Hunting Mastery Selected Tips

Hunting Mastery Selected Tips

Deer hunting is an interesting thing that reminds you of those golden old ages of 19th centuries, where a handsome hunk well equipped with all hunting material rides on horse searching for his target animal either for the purpose of displaying his masculine powers or for enticing and wooing his lady love.

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