Us Snipers Wind Direction Training

.223 69-gr. BTHP Match Distance in Yards

100

200

300

400

500

600

700

800

900

1000

5 mph

0.5"

1.8"

4.3"

8.2"

13.5"

20.5"

29.5"

41.1"

54.5"

70.0"

10 mph

0.9"

3.7"

8.7"

16.3"

27.0"

41.3"

59.5"

82.2"

109"

140"

15 mph

1.4"

5.5"

13.0"

24.5"

40.5"

61.8"

89.0"

123"

163"

210"

20 mph

1.8"

7.4"

17.4"

32.6"

54.0"

82.6"

129"

164"

218"

280"

30 mph

2.7"

11.1"

26.1"

48.9"

81.0"

124"

188"

247"

327"

420"

therefore, you divide 72 by 8, which equals 9, and you click off 9 MOA on your scope at 1/4 MOA increments, or 36 clicks. On another scope, you'd hold into the wind what you estimate to be 72 inches from your target— about the height of a man.

Where shooting into the wind gets tricky is when it's gusting or you must deal with several winds.

Old-time shooters will tell you not to wait for pauses during a steady wind, that you'll have much better results shooting into a predictable wind than hoping a short calm lasts long enough for your bullet to reach the target.

Strong gusts require timing your shot, and the spotter helps by telling you when to fire. With his eyes free and able to look around, he should be able to assess when it's best to shoot. When faced by two winds, try to time your shot so it's fired during the slower or the least gusting or the farther wind so there's less effect and a more predictable outcome. (This is getting pretty complex, but the reason you prefer shooting through a farther wind is that there's less remaining flight time to be affected by the wind.)

When shooting in mountains or urban areas, don't be concerned by updrafts; where they exist, these winds are very shallow and your bullet will pass through too quickly to make much difference.

The role of the spotter is very important in a windy area because direction and speed may change with no warning. In the case of 90-degree winds, he should watch for changes in speed. If you have head or tailwinds, he watches closely for any shift in direction, from being no factor into having an effect.

USMC Wind Adjustment Method

For those of you having a boundless desire for ever more information, we've included an old U.S. Marine Corps method for computing sight changes when firing in the wind. The USMC has been using this windage adjustment method since the days of the 1903A3 Springfield. Ever sensitive to the feelings of my Marine brethren, I include it here lest they say I didn't know about it.

After determining wind direction and speed, use the following formula;

Range in 100 vds. x speed in mph MOA

15 (math constant) Windage

For instance, your target is 300 yards away, and there's a 10 mph wind:

Now just click in the 2 Minutes of Angle in the direction of the wind and aim dcad-on. This is a great formula—except it's only accurate at 500 yards or less. When your target is farther, the mathematical constant must increase, as shown below:

600 Yards 700 Yards 800 Yards 900 Yards 1,000 Yards

Divide by 14 Divide by 13 Divide by 13 Divide by 12 Divide by 11

Sniper Windage FormulaSniper Training Wind Calculations

requires camouflaging everything equally, so you must burlap-wrap your spotting scope if you're in a Ghillie suit, and your boots need draped material, too. Indeed, I've often seen poorly camouflaged boots compromise otherwise perfectly concealed sniper students. The heels also reflect sunlight off their shiny, worn rear edge.

Recognize that nature prefers randomness and curves, while straight lines and symmetry instantly shout, "Man/" You must fight the urge to "balance" camouflage, whether coloring your face or tying burlap to your rifle; keep it as irregular and random as possible— the occasional clump is more "natural" than the evenly spaced and uniform. Nature blends different colors and textures; it doesn't balance them.

Appreciate also that the eye is easily fooled by depth, that something that looks three-dimensional due to shading and dark coloring is far less suspicious than flat, painted two-dimensional surfaces. If your enemy thinks he's looking through you, you can't really be there.

Was this article helpful?

0 0
Hunting Mastery Selected Tips

Hunting Mastery Selected Tips

Deer hunting is an interesting thing that reminds you of those golden old ages of 19th centuries, where a handsome hunk well equipped with all hunting material rides on horse searching for his target animal either for the purpose of displaying his masculine powers or for enticing and wooing his lady love.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment