Ba Experimental

The "main British sub-machine gun during World War II was the famous Sten. which although hastily designed and roughly finished did its job very well. It was. however, a strictly wartime expedient and even before the war was quite over a new General Staff specification had been issued for a post-war sub-machine gun. This laid down the basic requirements that it should weigh a maximum of six pounds [2.72kg) without magazine, fire at not more than six hundred rounds per minute, have a magazine capacity of between thirty and sixty rounds, and take the No 5 rifle bayonet. Various tests were arranged between 1947 and 1952 for which a number of weapons were entered, among them the Birmingham Small Arms Company's weapon of the type illustrated. It was of conventional blowback mechanism, but was unusual in that it had no cocking handle, that function being performed by a flat rod attached to the plastic covered fore-end grip. When the grip was twisted and pushed forward the rod went with it and the end of it engaged the bolt which was then in the forward position. As the grip was pulled back the rod forced the bolt back also until it was caught by the sear, at which stage it disengaged from the rod. The gun also had another unusual feature in that the magazine housing could be released and swung forward on a hinge without removing the magazine, which was thought to facilitate the clearing of stoppages. It was fitted with a sturdy folding stock which did not interfere with the firing of

Above: The 9mm Experimental sub-machine gun designed by the Birmingham Small Arms Company and tested, but not accepted, by the British Army in 1949-52, is fired from the shoulder Above right: The BSA Experimental 1949 SMG is fired from the hip. Curved magazine denotes late model the gun when forward, and its change lever was situated above the left-hand pistol grip. Over the years there were a number of variations in the original design; the first model took a straight magazine, later ones being curved as illustrated, and as a result of a change in specification it was modified to take a bayonet There were also variations in the shape of the forehand grip. The gun was notfinally accepted for service and specimens of it are now quite rare.

Experimental Model Submachine Gun

Above: The 9mm Experimental sub-machine gun designed by the Birmingham Small Arms Company and tested, but not accepted, by the British Army in 1949-52, is fired from the shoulder Above right: The BSA Experimental 1949 SMG is fired from the hip. Curved magazine denotes late model

Bsa Experimental Model 1949
Great Britain MCEM 2

Although the Sten gun had served Great Britain well in the period 1941-45 it was not really of the quality required for the post-war army, and after the war was over tests began to find a suitable successor for it. A good deal of design work had been going on. both by native British designers and by a variety of Polish experts, so there was not likely to be any shortage of contenders. The series developed by Enfield were given the collective description of Military Carbine Experimental Models (MCEM). the various types being denoted by a serial number; as a matter of interest the first in the series was the work of Mr H. J. Turpin who had been instrumental in designing the original Sten gun. The weapon illustrated, the

MCEM 2. was the work of one of the rival designers, a Polish officer named Lieutenant Podsenkowsky, and it was in many ways an unusual weapon. It was under fifteen inches long and its magazine fitted into the pistol grip; it was also well balanced which meant that it could be fired one-handed like an automatic pistol. The bolt was of advanced design and consisted of a half cylinder 8/2 inches (216mm) long with the striker at the rear, so that at the instant of firing almost the whole of the barrel was in fact inside it. There was a slot above the muzzle into which the firer placed his finger to draw the bolt back to cock it. and the gun had a wire-framed canvas holster which could also be used as a butt. It fired at a cyclic rate of one thousand rounds per minute which made it very hard to control and which may have led to its rejection.

Great Britain STERLING LS A3

22lr Submachine Gun

Australia

El SUB-MACHINE GUN

The butt of the F1 is a prolongation of the barrel This makes for accurate shooting, but also necessitates an elevated sight line; hence the distinctive metal flap of the backsight.

Great Britain/Australia

Great Britain STERLING LS A3

Australia

El SUB-MACHINE GUN

The butt of the F1 is a prolongation of the barrel This makes for accurate shooting, but also necessitates an elevated sight line; hence the distinctive metal flap of the backsight.

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Responses

  • aki-petter
    What smg also shoots shotgun shells?
    7 years ago

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