Chinese Type

Length:

44" (1117mm)

Length:

34 65" (880mm)

Weight:

8 6lb (3 90kg)

Weight:

9 45lb (4 3kg)

Barrel:

25 75" (655mm)

Barrel:

16 34" (415mm)

Calibre:

7 7mm

Calibre:

7 62mm intermediate

Rifling:

4 groove r/hand

Rifling:

4 groove r/hand

Operation: Bolt

Feed:

30-round box

Feed:

5-round box

Muz Vel:

2350 f/s (717 m/s)

Muz Vel:

2350 f/s (715 m/s)

C. Rate:

600 rpm

Sights:

2625 yds (2400m)

Sights:

875 yds (800m)

This carbine is a shortened version of the rifle of the same designation, which had a service life from 1905 into World War II Note the metal dust cover over the bolt

Japanese Firearms World War
The short" version of the rifle adopted by Japan before World War II the normal" version was some 6in (152mm) longer Note the folding wire monopod - a refinement of dubious value

A close copy of the Soviet AK 47. the Chinese-made Type 56 assault rifle differs from its parent principally in having a permanently-attached folding bayonet of cruciform section

7 7mm Type 99 7 62mm Soviet M43

303" SAA Ball

7 7mm Type 99 7 62mm Soviet M43

303" SAA Ball

Japan

MEIJI CARBINE 38th YEAR TYPE

Japan made a remarkable change from a medieval to a modern state in the second half of the 19th Century. Her first rifle was a single shot bolt action model of 11 mm calibre which appeared in 1887 but which was replaced almost immediately by a rifle of smaller 8mm calibre with a tube magazine Her war with China in 1894 showed some defects in her armament and a commission headed by Colonel Arisaka was appointed to investigate the whole matter and make recommendations for improvement. The result was a series of Mauser type rifles, first adopted in 1897 and often known as Arisaka rifles. Their alternative title was the Meiji 30th year type, having been made in the 30th year of the rule of Emperor Meiji. Rifles of this type were used in the war against Russia in 1904-5 and a number were purchased by the British in 1914 to train their new Armies. The 38th year type came into use in 1905 and was an improved version of the earlier model. It had a long life, being used in World War II. The 38th year carbine was simply a shortened version of the rifle for use by arms other than infantry, and would take the standard bayonet. It had a metal dust cover over its bolt, similar to the one on the British Lee-Metford. but it proved very noisy in close-quarter jungle fighting. In many ways it would have been a better service weapon for the infantry than the long rifle, being much handier. Like most carbines however it suffered from fairly heavy recoil. There was a 1944 version with folding bayonet.

Japan rifle type 99

Japanese experience in China in the 1930s (like that of the Italians in the same period] showed the need for a more powerful cartridge than the 6 5mm they then used, and

A US observer of the Russo-Japanese War took this photograph of a Japanese infantryman taking aim with his Meiji 30th Year Type rifle. The 38th Year Type of 1905 was an improved version

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