Submachine

The standard sub-machine gun of the Australian Forces during World War II was the reliable and well tried Owen gun, which remained in service until 1962. In spite of its excellent reputation the Owen had certain drawbacks, principally its weight, its somewhat high cyclic rate of fire, and the fact that due to the exigencies of wartime manufacture many of its components were not interchangeable which made maintenance difficult. Before the war was over the Australians canvassed the views of many soldiers with battle experience as to what an ideal sub-machine gun should be. so that they had ample information on which to base any specifications for a new weapon. The first gun to be based on these ideas was similar in many ways to the Owen, but much lighter and with its magazine in the pistol grip. This model was not a success and was not developed However, in 1959 and 1960 two further models were produced: these were known provisionally as the X1 and X2, and after minor

Sub Machine Guns
SUOMI MODEL 1931 TZ 4B

Length:

34 25" (870mm)

Length:

33 5" (851mm)

Weight:

10 34lb (4 69kg)

Weight:

7 20lb(3 26kg)

Barrel:

12 5" (317mm)

Barrel:

9" (229mm)

Calibre:

9mm

Calibre:

9mm

Rifling:

6 groove r/hand

Rifling:

6 groove r/hand

Feed:

(See text)

Feed:

20/40-round box

C. Rate:

900 rpm

C. Rate:

550 rpm

Muz Vel:

1312 f/s (400 m/s)

Muz Vel:

1250 f/s (365 m/s)

Sights: 110-547 yds Sights: Fixed

Sights: 110-547 yds Sights: Fixed

Designed by Johannes Lahti. the Suomi entered service with the Finnish Army in 1931. It was a reliable, robust arm, but very heavy by modern standards.

Submachine Gun

The rough and ready appearance of the TZ 45, designed by the Giandoso brothers, is explained by its genesis in war-time Italy. It appeared in 1945 and only about 6.000 were made.

9mm Parabellum 9mm Parabellum

Finland

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