Ingram Model

Length:

29.8" (757mm)

Length:

10.5" (267mm)

Weight:

8.151b (3.70kg)

Weight:

7.63lb (3.46kg)

Barrel:

8.0" (203mm)

Barrel:

5.75" (146mm)

Calibre:

.45"

Calibre:

.45" or 9mm

Rifling:

4 groove r/hand

Rifling:

6 groove r/hand

Feed:

30-round box

Feed:

30/32-round box

C. Rate:

400 rpm

C. Rate:

1100 rpm

Muz Vel:

920 f/s (280 m/s)

Muz Vel:

924 f/s (280 m/s)

Sights:

Fixed

Sights:

Fixed

The compact Ingram with its component parts of magazine and suppressor Not very accurate it has nevertheless sold abroad to a number of countries.

United States of America M3A1

In 1941 the Small Arms Development Branch of the United States Army Ordnance Corps set out to develop a submachine gun in accordance with certain guidelines proposed by the various combat arms. The intention was to produce a weapon which could be mass-produced by modern methods, and once the basic design had been established by George Hyde, a well-known expert in the field of sub-machine guns, the production side was put into the hands of Frederick Sampson, an expert of equal standing in his own field. A very detailed study of the methods used to manufacture the successful British Sten gun was also made, and the work went ahead so quickly that prototypes had been successfully tested well before the end of 1942, and the new weapon accepted as standard under the designation of M3. The new gun was a very utilitarian looking arm, made as far as possible from stampings and with practically no machining except for the barrel and bolt. It worked by blowback and had no provision for firing single rounds, but as its cyclic rate was low this was acceptable. Its stock was of retractable wire and the calibre was .45" although conversion to 9mm was not difficult. It bore a strong resemblance to a grease gun, from which it derived its famous nickname. Large-scale use revealed some defects in the gun. and further successful attempts to simplify it were initiated; these resulted in the M3A1. Like its predecessor the new gun was made by modern

methods and was generally reliable. It worked, as before, by blowback but had no cocking handle, this process being achieved by the insertion of a finger into a slot cut in the receiver, by which the bolt could be withdrawn. The bolt, which had an integral firing pin. worked on guide rods which saved complicated finishing of the inside of the receiver and which gave smooth functioning with little interruption from dirt. An oil container was built into the pistol grip and a small bracket added to the rear of the retractable butt acted as a magazine filler. It used a box magazine which was not altogether reliable in dirty or dusty conditions until the addition of an easily removed plastic cover eliminated this defect. By the end of 1944 the new gun had been adopted and three months later it had officially replaced the Thompson as the standard submachine gun of the US Army.

Left: A corporal from the United States Marine Corps carries his M3A1 slung under his equipment pack and ready for use against any enemy forces in the drop zone.

United States of America INGRAM MODEL 10__

Named after its inventor. Gordon B. Ingram, this submachine gun evolved from a series of weapons designed after World War II. The Model 10 works on blowback but has wraparound bolts which make it possible to keep the weapon short and improve control at full automatic fire. The cocking handle on the top is equally convenient for right- or left-handed users. The magazine fits into the pistol-grip and the gun has a retractable butt. With the exception of the barrel it is made of stampings, with even the bolt made of sheet metal and filled with lead. The Model 10 is available in 9mm Parabellum or .45" Automatic Colt Pistol form. The smaller successor Model 11 variant differs mainly in the form of cartridge used, being the .38" ACP or 9mm Parabellum. Both are designed to be fitted with suppressors which can reduce sound considerably but are not conventional silencers because the bullet is allowed to reach its full velocity. It is a standard arm with a number of countries and was favoured by US special forces because of its handy size and high rate of fire: today, however, its inaccuracy is frowned upon and it is only produced in Model 11 form as the Cobray M11.

Left: "Grease Gun" at the ready an American soldier in olive-green fatigues advances stealthily through wooded terrain anticipating a close-quarter encounter.

Picture Credits

Unless otherwise credited, all pictures in this book were taken by Bruce Scott in the Weapons Museum, British School of Infantry, Warminister, Wiltshire.

The publisher wishes to thank the following organizations and individuals who have supplied photographs for this book. Photographs have been credited by page number; where more than one photograph appears on a page, references are made in the order of the columns across the page and then from top to bottom The following abbreviations have been used: Bentham Literary Services (Colonel John Weeks): BIS; Imperial War Museum: IWM; Military Archive & Research Service, London MARS. Additional research by Tony Moore.

6-7 Swiss Armeefotodienst; 8: National Army Museum/GKN Sankey; 10 ECPA; 11 US National Archives; 13: Bundesarchiv/US DoD; 14: US DoD; 15: Steyr Defence Products/Legion etrangere; 18-19: NATO; 22-23: ECPA; 23: Legion etrangere; 27: Terry Gander (2); 30-31 MARS; 34: IWM; 38: IWM; 42-43: IWM/Terry Gander/IWM, 44: UK Land Forces; 45: British Army Of the Rhine; 46-47: Accuracy International/Royal Ordnance; 48: Accuracy International; 49: UK Land Forces/British Aerospace; 54-55: Beretta/lsrael Military Industries; 56: Stato Maggiore Dell'Esercito; 57: Israel Military Industries; 59: US Army; 64-65: US Army; 68: Salamander Books. 69: Finnish Embassy; 72-73: IWM; 76-77: MARS/Terry Gander (2); 78 IWM (2); 79: US Army; 82: IWM; 83: US DoD (2); 84-85: UK Land Forces; 86-87: IWM/Novosti Press Agency; 88: ECPA; 89: US Navy; 90: Heckler & Koch, 92: US Air Force; 93: US DoD; 97: Terry Gander; 100-101: MARS (2); 104: IWM, 105: Terry Gander; 107: Heckler & Koch; 108: IWM; 109: Salamander Books; 112-113: Terry Gander (2); 116: IWM; 117: Terry Gander; 120-121: Terry Gander (2); 124-125: BSA (2); 128: Central Office of Information, London; 129: Terry Gander; 133: Terry Gander; 136: Beretta; 144: Terry Gander; 145: IWM; 148: Terry Gander; 149: MARS; 152: IWM, 153' IWM/US Army; 156-157: US Marine Corps/US Army.

Bibliography

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