Kragjorgensen Carbine Model

United States of America

US RIFLE MODEL 1903 (SPRINGFIELD)

RIFLE MODEL 1898 (US NAVY)

US RIFLE MODEL 1903 (SPRINGFIELD)

Length:

47" (1 194mm)

Length:

43 2" (1097mm)

Weight:

81b (3 63kg)

Weight:

8 7lb (3 94kg)

Barrel:

27 25" (692mm)

Barrel:

24" (610mm)

Calibre:

236"

Calibre:

30"

Rifling:

5 groove l/hand

Rifling:

4 groove r/hand

Operation: Straight-pull

Operation: Bolt

Feed:

5-round magazine

Feed:

5-round box

Muz Vel:

2400 f/s (732 m/s)

Muz Vel:

2800 f/s (813 m/s)

Sights: 2000 yds (1828m) Sights: 2700 yds (2469m)

Sights: 2000 yds (1828m) Sights: 2700 yds (2469m)

The US Army s first bolt-action, magazine rifle (carbine version seen here), in general issue by 1894, saw service in the Spanish-American War of 1898 and the Philippines Insurrection. 1899-1905

This rifle, adopted by the US Navy in 1895. is better known as the Lee straight pull' a reference to the breech mechanism, which is operated by direct backward pressure on the lever

1895 Krag Philippine Constabulary

Called the Springfield from its place of manufacture, this rifle was in general US issue by 1906. replacing the Krag-Jorgensen.

30" Model 1898 236" Model 1895 30" 06 Springfield

303" SAA Ball

United States of America KRAG-J0RGEN8EN CARBINE MODEL 1896

This was the first bolt-action magazine rifle to be used by the United States Army. It was officially adopted in 1892 to replace the old single-shot Springfield but did not come into general issue until 1894. It was closely based on a weapon invented by Captain Ole Krag of the Danish Army and an engineer named Eric Jorgensen, and the United States paid these inventors one dollar for every one made in America. It was of normal bolt action, its most unusual feature being a five-round box magazine on the right hand side which had to be loaded, one cartridge at a time, through a loading gate which incorporated the magazine spring. The raised thumbpiece by which it was opened is clearly visible in the photograph. There were a number of variations, none of them very important. It was used by the regular Army in Cuba in 1898 although the Militia still had the single-shot Springfield. Soon after the introduction of the Krag-Jorgensen, the United States decided to adopt a new rifle based on the Mauser system and the Krag then disappeared from the military scene. It was an excellent rifle and many converted examples are still in use as sporting rifles in the United States. The specimen illustrated is of interest because it is one of the last carbines used by the United States before the adoption of a standard rifle for general issue regardless of arm or service, which occurred with the introduction of the 1903 Springfield.

Illistrated Parts Browning Pump Shotgun
The first contingent of the American Expeditionary Force to arrive in England, 1917, parades with Model 1903 [Springfield] rifles and equipment stacked

United States of America

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