Owen Machine Carbine

Sten Machine Carbine Marks

Designed for use in the jungles of the Far East during World War II. the magazine of the Owen is set vertically above the gun, facilitating the user's movement through thick cover

STEN GUN MAUX 6(8) OWEN MACHINE CARBINE

Length (s): 35 75" (908mm)

Length:

32" (813mm)

Weight:

9 Sib (4 45kg)

Weight:

9 35lb (4 24kg)

Barrel:

7 80" (198mm)

Barrel:

9 75" (250mm)

Calibre:

9mm

Calibre:

9mm

Rifling:

6 groove r/hand

Rifling:

7 groove r/hand

Feed:

32-round box

Feed:

32-round box

C. Rate:

550 rpm

C. Rate:

700 rpm

Muz Vel:

C1000 f/s (305 m/s)

Muz Vel:

1375 f/s (420 m/s)

Sights:

Fixed

Sights:

Fixed, offset

50s 9mm Machine Guns

9mm SAA Ball 9mm Parabellum

303" SAA Ball

Silenced 303

Great Britain

STEN QUIT MARK 6(8)_

A British Army sergeant fires a Sten Gun Mark 6[S] fitted with an extremely complex sniper scope. This silenced arm was in use as late as 1953.

Great Britain

STEN QUIT MARK 6(8)_

The Mark 2 Sten. which has already been described, probably marked the lowest point in the gun's history, and thereafter quality began to improve. Practically all components were still made in small factories and workshops with no previous connection with the manufacture of firearms, but. perhaps due to experience, the general finish was markedly better than in the early days There was a Mark 3 (similar in appearance to the Mark 2) which was made in huge numbers and this was followed by a Mark 4, which never went into full scale production. This in turn was followed by probably the best Sten of all. the Mark 5. which was to see service from 1944 until well into the 1950s. Although very similar to its predecessors it was of more

A British Army sergeant fires a Sten Gun Mark 6[S] fitted with an extremely complex sniper scope. This silenced arm was in use as late as 1953.

robust construction with a wooden butt (some with brass buttplates) and pistol grip, and provision was made for it to take the standard bayonet. Experiments had been conducted earlier with a silenced Mark 6 Sten which was sufficiently successful to attract the admiration of Colonel Skorzeny. the famous German who rescued Mussolini, and in 1944 it was decided that a weapon of this type was again required. The standard Mark 2 silencer was thus fitted to the Mark 5, which was then re-designated Mark 6(S). The muzzle velocity of the Mark 5 bullet was in excess of the speed of sound which posed a number of problems in connection with the sonic boom effect, but by drilling gas escape holes in the barrel the

A civilian technician fires the Australian Owen Machine Carbine. Note that, unlike the weapon shown on the colour spread, the metal bodywork between butt and trigger-grip has not been cutaway

Sten Machine Carbine Marks

velocity was brought down to the required figure. The silencer tended to heat rapidly so a canvas hand guard was laced over it. It was not considered advisable to fire bursts through the silencer except in extreme emergencies. The Mark 6 Sten was used mainly by airborne forces and Resistance fighters in World War II and as late as 1953.

Australia

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