Sten Gun Mark

Length:

30" (762mm)

Weight:

6 65lb (3kg)

Barrel:

7 75" (197mm)

Calibre:

9mm

Rifling:

6/2 groove r/hand

Feed:

32-round box

C. Rate:

550 rpm

Muz Vel:

1200 f/s (365 m/s)

Sights: Fixed

Sights: Fixed

Length: 30" (762mm)

STEN GUN MARK 2 (SECOND PATTERN)

Length: 30" (762mm)

Weight:

6 65lb (3kg)

Barrel:

7 75" (197mm)

Calibre:

9mm

Rifling:

2 or 5 groove r/hand

Feed:

32-round box

C. Rate:

550 rpm

Muz Vel:

1200 f/s (365 m/s)

Sights:

Fixed

Rifling MachineSten Machine Gun
9mm SAA Ball 9mm SAA Ball

303" SAA Ball

Great Britain STEN aim MARX 8

Towards the end of 1941 a modified version of the Sten Mark I appeared in the form of the Mark 2. this being the first of a long series of changes in the general design of the weapon. The Mark 2 was basically a somewhat stripped-down version of the Mark I. the intention being to simplify manufacturing processes wherever possible. The British gun trade had always prided itself on the finish of its weapons almost as much as on their effectiveness, and the tradition of machined and blued metal allied with polished walnut was a strong one. Nevertheless Great Britain was by this time fighting very literally for her existence and had therefore reached the inevitable conclusion that in emergencies, appearance was not important, only effectiveness, which set a fashion particularly in world sub-machine guns, for many years afterwards. This resulted in the Sten gun Mark 2, the ugliest, nastiest weapon ever used by the British Army. It looked cheap because it was cheap, with its great unfiled blobs of crude welding metal, its general appearance of scrap-iron, and its tendency to fall to pieces if dropped onto a hard surface. Nevertheless it worked, and not only worked but managed to incorporate one or two improvements, notably by attaching the magazine housing to a rotatable sleeve, held by a spring, so that in bad conditions it could be turned upwards through 90° thus acting as a dust cover for the ejection opening. This was a most useful refinement at a time when the British Army was engaged in large-scale fighting in North Africa. Although the British Army, accustomed to its high quality Short Magazine Lee Enfield rifles and handsomely finished Bren light machine guns, joked about their tin Tommy-gun' they got good value out of it. Perhaps one of the most persistent weaknesses in the make-up of the wartime Sten gun was in the relatively poor quality of its magazine, although in the circumstances of hasty construction with poor metal this is not altogether to be wondered at. In particular the lips were very susceptible to damage, which had a serious effect on the feed and led to endless stoppages It was also found that the dirt and dust inseparable from the fighting in the Western desert, tended to clog the magazine, and although careful attention to cleanliness helped in this respect the problem was never really solved with this particular weapon. Despite these drawbacks, the Mark 2 was an important weapon.

Problems With The Sten Gun Magazine

accordingly. There was. however, an equal need for other weapons too. so that no priority could be given. All that could be done was to pare and reduce and simplify so that three weapons could be produced with the same effort and little more than the same matériel, that had produced two previously. Much help was given by some of the Dominions, notably Canada, and the weapon illustrated is an example of the type made there at the famous Long Branch factory. Although made to similar specifications to the British version, it is of somewhat better finish, with a more robust skeleton butt. It also has a bayonet, details of which are clearly shown in the illustration, and examples of this are now very rare. Perhaps appropriately this type was first used in action on the ill-fated Dieppe raid of 19 August, 1942 in which the Canadian Army fought gallantly. Below left: Free French soldier in training with Sten Mark 2. Below: British Home Guard men receive instruction from soldier with Sten Mark 2 [Second Pattern), with bayonet fixed.

British Sten Machine Gun

Great Britain STEN GUN MAUX 8 (SECOND PATTERN)

The British and Colonial forces appeared to have an insatiable appetite for Sten guns. Over one hundred thousand of the earlier Marks had been produced by early 1942 and there was still no slackening of the demand. Apart from the inevitable loss and damage in action, more and more troops were being raised and trained, and as the prospect of an invasion of North West Europe, with the probability of extensive street fighting in towns and villages, drew closer the need for sub-machine guns continued to increase. Apart from the regular armies there was also an increasing demand for light, easily concealed automatic weapons from the various Resistance movements in occupied Europe so that production had to be increased

Great Britain/Australia

Great Britain

STEN GUN MARK 6(8)

Great Britain

STEN GUN MARK 6(8)

Hand Guard For Sten Gun

The Mark 2 silencer fitted to this arm, which was largely used by special forces, tended to heat rapidly; hence the canvas hand guard fitted over its rear area

Australia

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