Sterling Ls A

Fl SUB-MACHINE GUN

Length:

28" (800mm)

Length:

28 1" (925mm)

Weight:

6lb (2 75kg)

Weight:

7 2lb (3 266kg)

Barrel

7 8" (198mm)

Barrel:

8" (203mm)

Calibre:

9mm

Calibre:

9mm

Rifling:

6 groove r/hand

Rifling:

6 groove r/hand

Feed:

32-round box

Feed:

34-round box

C. Rate:

550 rpm

C. Rate:

600 rpm

Muz Vel:

1200 f/s (365 m/s)

Muz Vel:

1200 f/s (365 m/s)

Sights: 100 and 200 yds Sights: Fixed

Sights: 100 and 200 yds Sights: Fixed

Sterling Machine Gun

Developed from 1942 onward this arm. then known as the Patchett after its designer, was extensively tested by the British Army from 1947 and was adopted to replace the Sten in 1953

303" SAA Ball

Great Britain STERLING L2A3

This gun was designed by a Mr George Patchett and was at first known as the Patchett submachine gun. It was originally patented in 1942 and by the end of the war a small number had been made by the Sterling Engineering Company, which had earlier.been involved in the production of the Lanch├ęster. A few of these early guns were used by British airborne troops towards the end of the war and their reports on them were encouraging. In the course of the search for a replacement for the Sten this gun was tested against various others in 1947; none was accepted as a result of this first trial because all were considered to need modification. By the time of the next trial in 1951 the Patchett. as it was still then called, was clearly the best gun of those available, and in September 1953 it was finally accepted for

Covered by a comrade with a Sterling L2A3 sub-machine gun, a British paratrooper enters a deserted house, in training.

service in the British Army. Its official title was the SMG L2A1. but from the date of its introduction it was commonly known as the Sterling The gun, which is well made and finished, is of normal blowback mechanism but is unusual in having a ribbed bolt which cuts away dirt and fouling as it accumulates and forces it out of the receiver. This allows the gun to function well under the most adverse conditions. The gun underwent a good many modifications after its initial introduction, notably in the addition of foresight protections, varying shapes of muzzle and butt, and on one light version a spring-loaded bayonet. Some of the earlier models also took a straight magazine. The current version is the L2A3. and the standard Canadian SMG is closely based on it.

The Australian F1 sub-machine gun: note height of the shaped metal flap of the backsight

modifications became the weapon illustrated, the F1. It was based largely on the original specification and is light in weight and with a much lower cyclic rate than its predecessor. It retains the top magazine of the Owen which was universally popular, although it requires offset sights. The backsight is a shaped metal flap which folds forward over the receiver when not required. The height of this sight is made necessary because the butt is a prolongation of the barrel, which makes for accurate shooting but which requires the sight line to be high. The cocking handle, which is on the left of the body, has a cover attached to it to keep dirt out of the cocking slot. Although the cocking handle is normally non-reciprocating, the F1 incorporates a device by which it can be made to engage the bolt. This means that if the mechanism becomes jammed with dirt the bolt can be worked backwards and forwards by means of the handle in order to loosen it. The pistol grip is a standard rifle component.

The Australian F1 sub-machine gun: note height of the shaped metal flap of the backsight

Australia

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