Ppd 34.magazine

Length: 33 75" (858mm)

Length: 32 25" (819mm)

Weight:

8lb (3 63kg)

Weight:

7 4lb(3 36kg)

Barrel:

10 75" (273mm)

Barrel:

10" (254mm)

Calibre:

7 62mm

Calibre:

7 62mm

Rifling:

4 groove r/hand

Rifling:

4 groove r/hand

Feed:

35-round box

Feed:

35-round box

C. Rate:

900 rpm

C. Rate:

700 rpm

Muz Vel:

1400 f/s (472 m/s)

Muz Vel:

1600 f/s (488 m/s)

Sights:

110-219 yds

Sights:

Flip 110-219 yds

Machin GunChinese Type Pps

7 62mm Ml930g 7 62mm MI930g

303" SAA Ball

People's Republic of China TYPE 80

Like many of the weapons used by Communist China, their sub-machine gun Type 50 had its origins in a weapon first produced by the Soviet Union, in this case the PPSh41. As with most other combatant nations the Russians soon saw the need for mass production and the new gun was largely made of heavy gauge stampings, welded, pinned and brazed as necessary. The gun was of normal blowback mechanism and had the interior of the barrel chromed, a fairly common Soviet device One of its distinctive features is that the front end of the perforated barrel casing slopes steeply backward from top to bottom, thus acting as a compensator to keep the muzzle down. In spite of its high cyclic rate of fire the gun was reasonably accurate and could be fired in single rounds if required. The earliest versions had a tangent backsight but this was soon replaced by a simpler flip sight The Chinese Communists received many of these guns in and after 1949 and started their own large scale manufacture of them in 1949 or 1950. Their version was essentially similar to its Russian counterpart, but had a somewhat lighter stock. It is also designed to take a curved box magazine though it will also fire the 71 -round drum which was the standard magazine on the original Russian model. All Chinese versions have the two-range flip sight. The first locally-made weapons were crude in the extreme and gave the impression of having been made by apprentice blacksmiths (as perhaps they were] Nevertheless they worked, which was the first and only requirement of the Chinese. The Type 50 was used extensively by the Chinese in the Korean war where it earned the inelegant but expressive nickname burp-gun' from its high rate of fire. Many were also used against the French in Indo-China in the 1950s.

People's Republic of China TYPE 84

Korean War Burp Gun

The origins of this particular weapon are unusual, since it was designed by A. Sudarev at Leningrad in 1942 when the city was under actual blockade by the Germans. Arms were in short supply and as none could be brought in it became necessary to improvise from local resources. The new gun originally known as the Russian PPS 42, was therefore made in the city itself, so that weapons coming off the production line mi caught it a sharp blow and knocked it clear. After the Chinese revolution of 1949, the Soviet Union naturally supplied its new ally with a considerable quantity of arms including large numbers of the PPS 43. and by 1953 the Chinese had begun large-scale manufacture of these weapons, virtually unchanged in appearance from the Russian prototypes. The only way in which it can be distinguished is by the fact that the plastic pistol grips often bear a large letter K in a central design. This, however, is by no means universal and other designs, including a diamond, may be found The gun is still often found in South East Asia.

A soldier of the People 's Republic of China receives instruction in the 7-62mm Type 54 sub-machine gun. a direct copy of the Soviet PPS 43. The Chinese lay great emphasis on aquatic training; hence this unusual firing position.

Pps43 Mods

were liable to be used in action in a matter of hours. As was to be expected the gun was made of stampings, using any suitable grade of metal, and was held together by riveting, welding, and pinning. Nevertheless it was not only cheap but it turned out to be effective. It worked on the usual simple blowback system and would only fire automatic; perhaps its oddest feature was its semi-circular compensator, which helped to keep the muzzle down but increased blast considerably. This was followed by the PPS 43. modified and improved by the same engineer who had been responsible for the earlier model. Its most unusual feature was that it had no separate ejector in the normal sense of the word. The bolt moved backwards and forwards along a guide rod which was of such a length that as the bolt came back with the empty case, the end of the rod

Soviet Union

The PPD (Pistolet-Pulemyot. or sub-machine gun. designed by Vasily Degtyaryev) was fed from a drum magazine (right) holding 71 rounds and operated by a clockwork mechanism

Pps Magazines Round

The PPSh (Pistolet-Pulemyot designed by Georgi Shpagin) was mass-produced from 1942 onward Whole battalions of the Soviet armies carried sub-machine guns and total production exceeded 5 million

Soviet Union PPD 34/38

Soviet Union Machine Gun

Soviet Union PPD 34/38

PPD 34/38

Length

30 6" (779mm)

Weight:

8 25lb (3 74kg)

Barrel:

10 75" (272mm)

Calibre:

7 62mm

Rifling:

4 groove r/hand

Feed:

71-round drum

C. Rate:

800 rpm

Muz Vel:

1600 f/s (489 m/s)

Sights: 547 yds (500m)

Sights: 547 yds (500m)

PPSh 41

Length:

33 1" (841mm)

Weight:

8 0lb(3 63kg)

Barrel

10 6" (269mm)

Calibre:

7 62mm

Rifling:

4 groove r/hand

Feed:

71 drum/35 box

C. Rate:

900 rpm

Muz Vel:

1600 f/s (489 m/s)

Sights:

547 yds (500m)

Machine Gun

7 62mm Mi930g 7 62mm M1930g

303" SAA Ball

Soviet Union PPD 34/38

This weapon was designed by Vasily Degtyaryev, the well-known Soviet expert on automatic weapons, and the D in the title is his initial, the PP standing for Pistolet-Pulemyot. the usual Russian term for what we know as a sub-machine gun. It initially appeared in 1934 and may be regarded as the first really successful weapon of its type to be used in the Soviet Army. It was based fairly closely on the German MP28.II. and coming before the days of mass-production was reasonably well made and finished by the standards of Russian industry as it then was. The PPD worked by normal blowback on the open bolt principle single rounds or bursts being obtained by the use of a selector in front of the trigger. Both bore and chamber were chromed to prevent undue wear. The cartridges were fed from a near-vertical drum with an unusual extension piece which fitted into the bottom of the receiver: this drum, which was worked by clockwork, was very similar mechanically to that of the Finnish Suomi. and held seventy-one rounds. This gave the soldier using it a good reserve of fire without having to reload, but made the gun heavy As drum magazines are susceptible to dirt, there were probably also problems over stoppages; there was in fact also a curved box magazine but this was very rarely used. One or two minor variations to the original model were made, the most obvious being the reduction in the number of jacket slots from rows of eight small ones to three larger ones. Although the gun was technically replaced by the PPD 40 in 1940 it was used in the Finnish campaigns and probably also saw later service elsewhere

Red Army soldiers with a knocked-out German AFV during World War II. Those at centre and right have PPD 34/38 sub-machine guns.

Red Army soldiers with a knocked-out German AFV during World War II. Those at centre and right have PPD 34/38 sub-machine guns.

Sub Machine GunsRussian Mounted Machine Gun
Tank-mounted Russian scouts with PPSh 41 sub-machine guns; note that these have drum magazines.

Soviet Union PPSh 41

At the outbreak of World War II in 1939, the Soviet Army was armed with the PPD 34/38. but by the beginning of 1940 this was gradually being replaced by a modified version of the PPD 40 which was similar in appearance but took a different type of drum. Almost immediately the gun illustrated was put into limited production, and after stringent testing by the Russian Army was finally approved early in 1942, after which production was on a vast scale. It was designed by Georgii Shpagin. another well-known Russian expert, and this fact is denoted by the inclusion of his initial in the official designation of the new gun. The PPSh was an early and successful example of the application of mass-production techniques to the manufacture of firearms, a change made essential by the Soviet Union's huge military commitments at that time. As far as possible it was made from sheet metal stampings, welding and riveting being used wherever feasible, and although it retained the rather old-fashioned looking wooden butt it was a sturdy and reliable arm. It worked on the usual blowback system with a buffer at the rear end of the receiver to reduce vibration and had a selector lever in front of the trigger to give single rounds or burst as required. As its cyclic rate of fire was high and would have tended to make the muzzle rise when firing bursts, the front of the barrel jacket was sloped backwards so as to act as a compensator, a simple and reasonably successful expedient. Feed for the PPSh was either by a seventy-one round drum, basically similar to that of the earlier PPD series but not interchangeable with them, or by a thirty-five round box. In order to reduce wear and help cleaning, the bore and chamber of these guns were all chromed. There appear to have been only two basic models of this gun; the first model, the one illustrated, had a somewhat complicated tangent backsight, while the second one made do with a perfectly adequate two aperture flip sight. The Soviet armies greatly favoured the submachine gun and on occasions whole battalions were armed with it, so it is not surprising that the total numbers manufactured should have exceeded five million. It was also widely copied by other Communist countries, and although long obsolete in the Soviet Union itself it is probably still extensively used elsewhere. The Chinese in particular copied it as their Type 50 and must themselves have produced it in vast numbers.

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