Zk

Length:

35 4" (899mm)

Weight:

9 371b (4 25kg)

Barrel:

12 8" (325mm)

Calibre:

9mm

Rifling:

6 groove r/hand

Feed:

30-round box

C. Rate:

500 and 700 rpm

Muz Vel:

1250 f/s (365 m/s)

Sights:

875 yds (800m)

VZ 61 (THE SKORPION)

Length (f):

10 65" (271mm)

Weight:

2 9lb (1 31kg)

Barrel:

4 5" (1 14mm)

Calibre:

7 65mm

Rifling:

6 groove r/hand

Feed:

10/20-round box

C. Rate:

700 rpm

Muz Vel:

970 f/s (294 m/s)

Sights: Flip 82-164 yds

Sights: Flip 82-164 yds

The standard Bulgarian SMG of World War II-also manufactured and used by the Germans-the ZK 383 is unusual in having a folding bipod, which is said to have contributed much to its accuracy

383 Submachine Gun
7 65mm Auto Pistol -' i1 303" SAA Ball c____ —-

Czechoslovakia ZK 383

This weapon, which was designed by the Koucky brothers at Brno, first appeared in 1933 and was still in production three years after the end of World War II. It is a most sophisticated and very well made weapon, manufactured of precision castings of excellent finish, and cannot have been cheap to produce. It is of particular interest in having a dual rate of fire: this is achieved by removing a weight on the bolt, which increases its rate of functioning

There is also a quick release barrel, although it is not clear whether this was for changing in action or simply to facilitate cleaning. The ZK 383 will fire either single rounds or automatic as required, the change lever above the trigger being pushed back or forward as necessary. The stud behind it is the push-in safety. The pierced barrel casing carried the foresight and a well made tangent backsight. Another unusual feature is its folding bipod, which when not required for use is turned backward into a recess in the woodwork. This bipod is said to make a considerable

Skorpion Machine Pistol
Skorpion from the shoulder, with butt extended. Note his forward grip on the magazine.

improvement in the accuracy of the gun. but even so it is likely that the maximum setting of 800 yards is optimistic. This was the standard submachine gun used by the Bulgarian Army during and after World War II. The Germans continued to manufacture it after they had over-run Czechoslovakia and it was used by their SS troops A modified version was also produced for police use. It had no bipod and no tangent sight. It is believed that there was a variation of the standard gun with a bipod which folded forward Some models took a bayonet.

Czechoslovakia

VZ 61 (THE SKORPION)

This is a good example of the rather small number of true machine pistols, its general dimensions being comparable to those of the Mauser' pistol model 1896. It is therefore of relatively limited use as a military weapon, except possibly for tank crews, motor cyclists and similar categories for whom a compact secondary weapon is more important than performance. Its small calibre also reduces its stopping power although of course the use of automatic fire helps considerably in this respect. There is also a bigger version, made only in limited quantities, which fires a 9mm round and is in consequence a good deal heavier although similar in essence. The Skorpion works on the normal blowback system. Very light automatic weapons often have the disadvantage that their cyclic rate of fire is unacceptably high, but in this weapon the problem is largely overcome by the use of a type of buffer device in the butt. It has a light wire butt for use from the shoulder, this can be folded forward when not required without affecting the working of the weapon. Although the size and capacity of the Skorpion reduces its military efficiency, it is an excellent weapon for police or other forms of internal security work since it is inconspicuous and easily concealed Its low muzzle velocity also makes it relatively easy to silence, and an effective model is available which is an additional advantage in this sort of role. It has been sold to many African countries.

Israel/ Denmark

Israel UZI

Silenced Pellet Gun

Denmark

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