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A female forming die should be made with a "U" shaped cross section formed by bolting, riveting, or welding two lengths of three-eighths inch or thicker steel to a center section of the same material which will be .800 inch wide. The sides should be one and one-half inch high, measured from the inside bottom section. The length should be at least twelve inches. Slightly bevel or chamfer the inner top wall and polish It until it is as smooth as possible. This will facilitate the sheet steel being formed to enter with as little friction as possible. If only a few magazines will be formed, angle iron may be used to make this forming die, provided that another piece is welded across each end to prevent it from spreading open.

A male die must be made to fit exactly the opening in the female die, less double the thickness of the material being formed, less another .003 inch to .010 inch for clearance. This simply means that If the opening in the female die is .800 inch and you are using eighteen gage sheet metal, you add.048 Inch plus .048 inch plus .005 Inch (or whatever clearance you deem proper) which totals .101 inch, which when subtracted from the .800 Inch, leaves .699 inch. In this case, the male die would hava to be .699 inch. There should also be .048 inch •utotractad from the 1.500 inch depth to make an overall ctocrtftof 1 452 inches.

A longitudinal slot five-sixteenths inch wide and one-fourth inch deep should be filed in the top or back side of this male die with a round or radiused bottom. In addition, all four corners should be slightly rounded.

Place the male portion of the die inside the female portion, with a shim of sheet metal on each side. This shim should be of the same thickness as the magazine material to keep it centered. Then drill a three-eighths inch hole at each end, close enough to each end so that there is room for the ten inch magazine to be formed between them. The holes should be drilled through both the male and female dies simultaneously while they are together.

A close fitting guide pin should be used in each of these holes, to keep the die in line while the magazine is being formed. If the dies are to be used more than once, a slightly oversize pin should be pressed into each end of the female die and the holes in the male die should be reamed to a close slip fit over them. If you only plan to use the dies a few times though, loose pins will suffice.

After greasing lightly, center the sheet metal blank across the top of the female die. The male die (also lubricated lightly) should be centered on top of the sheet metal blank, and then the whole business should be squeezed together either in a press or with a large vise.

t five-sixteenths inch wide and one-juld be filed in the top or back side th a round or radiused bottom. In rners should be slightly rounded, »ortion of the die inside the female n of sheet metal on each side. This :he same thickness as the magazine centered. Then drill a three-eighths nd, close enough to each end so that he ten inch magazine to be formed he holes should be drilled through j female dies simultaneously while

^uide pin should be used in each of *p the die in line while the magazine If the dies are to be used more than ersize pin should be pressed into each e die and the holes in the male die J to a close slip fit over them. If you le dies a few times though, loose pins lightly, center the sheet metal blank the female die. The male die (also lub-hould be centered on top of the sheet j then the whole business should be 9r either in a press or with a large vise.

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You may also force them togetl around the dies and another enough space between them fi jack will force the die together, into the shape of the magazir form the front and both sides of

Then the back side must be 1 bar of steel along the side of t tending from the top of the die It toward the middle. Do this oi a three-sixteenths inch lengthv place by grinding three-sixteen half thickness. This rod shou riveted, or otherwise fastened t the outside form, place the pi over the top of the die and pres the bond is secure, remove th pushing the male die out froi should be sweated (solder), bra after which the lips should be c ward to the shape shown.

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Vou may also force them together by wrapping a chain •round the dies and another bar of metal, leaving enough space between them for a hydraulic jack. The Jack will force the die together, forming the sheet metal Into the shape of the magazine. Either method will form the front and both sides of the magazine body.

Then the back side must be formed. After placing a bar of steel along the side of the sheet metal, still extending from the top of the die, tap it smartly, bending it toward the middle. Do this on both sides. Then form a three-sixteenths inch lengthwise ridge on a flat steel place by grinding three-sixteenths inch diameter rod to half thickness. This rod should be brazed, soldered, riveted, or otherwise fastened to the plate. To complete the outside form, place the plate,'with rod attached, over the top of the die and press them together. When the bond is secure, remove the form from the die by pushing the male die out from one end. The seam should be sweated (solder), brazed, or riveted together, after which the lips should be cut to shape and bent inward to the shape shoyvn.

The reinforcing section is made in the same manner except it only has three sides with the front left open. When formed to the proper shape, with the lips cut to shape and bent inward, it is placed over the magazine body and welded or silver soldered in place.

The bottom sides must be flared at right angles outward from the magazine body, leaving a one-sixteenth inch lip projecting from each side. The bottom plate will slide onto these lips. This can be done with a hammer and a flat bar of steel, but the male die should be placed back inside the magazine while forming, to prevent it from being bent out of shape. Clamp a flat plate to the side, flush with the bottom of the angle. While holding the flat bar against the bottom, make the bend by tapping it with a hammer.

The bottom plate is made to the dimensions shown (it should just slip over the bottom of the magazine) by bending to shape in the same manner or by forming it in the small die. After it is shaped, drill a three-sixteenths inch hole somewhere close to the center and make a matching keeper by drilling through a plate which is sized to fit inside the bottom of the magazine body. Then rivet a three-sixteenths inch diameter projection in place.

The purpose of the bottom of the magazine spring is to bear against this keeper, pressing it firmly against the bottom plate with the stud engaging the hole. This will prevent the bottom plate from being removed unless the stud is pushed inward.

The magazine follower may be made from one-half inch flat stock. By filing and grinding a proper bevel as

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shown, and by welding a leg of one-eighth inch flat stock at both the front and rear to serve as guides, you will have a follower that will be kept from binding.

In most cases, factory made magazine followers are stamped and drawn to shape. This requires rather complicated, complex shaped dies though. So, unless a large number of magazines are to be made, I recommend the welded-up follower.

The only way I know of to wind a magazine spring, with the minimum of tools that we have available, is to make a mandrel from a ten or twelve inch length of three-eighths inch by one inch flat stock. Start by grinding the front and back edges until they are round.

Also, drill a one-sixteenth inch hole near one Then, with one end of a length of one-sixteenth inch music wire (or spring stock) fastened in the hole, feed the remainder through a groove filed in a one-half Inch square bar some ten inches long. A useable spring will result if the bar is wound around and around the mandrel. Note: I said a useable spring. It may not be particularly pretty.

Somewhere between five and six feet of wire will be required to wind such a spring. If music wire or spring stock is not available, a screen door return spring or similar spring will have to be straightened out and reworked. This will not be easy, but it can be done, if nothing else is useable.

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